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Old 02-24-2003, 10:59 AM   #1
Z28kid
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Can someone explain this to me?


what is the difference between an ethernet hub and a hub/router?

Can the router do all the things a hub can do?
 
Old 02-24-2003, 11:06 AM   #2
loke137
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I think a router serve as an internet gateway, so it has it's own IP address, so you can use it to spoof a network.

Last edited by loke137; 02-24-2003 at 11:07 AM.
 
Old 02-24-2003, 11:18 AM   #3
Crashed_Again
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Hubs are much less efficient then routers. First of all, the majority of hubs are not manageble. By that I mean you can not connect to them and change any configurations.

When a request comes into a hub it sends the packets to each and every node connected to the hub.

Routers are usually manageble and some of them determine exactly where the packets are intended for and send them to the correct node as appose to sending them to each node.
 
Old 02-24-2003, 12:33 PM   #4
Z28kid
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so would it be better to get a router than a hub for using it to browse the web with windows and running a webserver?

Which one is best?
 
Old 02-24-2003, 12:48 PM   #5
Dark_Helmet
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The answer depends on one other question: How many IP addresses does your ISP provide you with?

If the ISP gives you only one IP address, then you MUST use a router if more than one computer will share the connection. You can buy a router off the shelf, or you can configure a linux machine to act like a router.

If the ISP gives you more than one IP address, then either the router or the hub will be sufficient.

From the point of view of you linux and windows boxes, they don't know and don't care what they're connected to.

A couple more things to consider though:
1. A router is more expensive than a hub
2. A router requires configuration to work properly (i.e. packet forwarding, dhcp, etc.)
3. A hub "throttles down" to the slowest connection. That is, if you have a 10-MBit device and two 100-MBit devices plugged into the same hub, then everybody is forced to transfer at 10-MBit (even if the two 100-MBit devices are talking to each other).
4. A hub requires absolutely 0 configuration.

From what you've said, I think you'd probably best be served by a router. It can do everything a hub does and more. Not only that, it will do everything better (more intelligently) too.
 
Old 02-24-2003, 05:20 PM   #6
Z28kid
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Thanks dark helmet it sounds like i need a router. but if i wanted to how could i set up linux to be a router?
 
Old 02-24-2003, 08:11 PM   #7
Dark_Helmet
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I'm afraid I can't be of much help there. I've never done it myself... I know it's possible though. I did a quick search on google and didn't come up with anything. Maybe some of the other folks around can help.

If you've got the money though, then I'd suggest just getting the router and avoid any possible complications with configuring a linux box to do the job.
 
Old 02-24-2003, 08:42 PM   #8
camlinux
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Yes but wouldn't configuring the linux box be much more fun

P.S. I have no idea how to do it.

Here are a couple sites I found that might help though

http://linuxrouter.org

http://www.viperlair.com/articles/so...lnx_fw_1.shtml

Last edited by camlinux; 02-24-2003 at 08:47 PM.
 
Old 02-24-2003, 09:14 PM   #9
bigjohn
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I picked up a router/modem over the last weekend, and it has solved most of the problems that I was getting with just a modem.

I opted for not quite the cheapest available - that would be about the 60 to 70 $$$ over here.

I went for the 1 port model aimed at SOHO set up's. If I wanted to network it properly, I would have to get a multi port switch.

As far as configuration was concerned, the only thing I am still trying to sus out is the hardware firewalling - luckily, it's no snags disabling the "network".

the price was about the 100$ mark I got the SAR 110 and am vvv pleased with it. Presumably it's available in the US.

regards

John
 
Old 02-24-2003, 09:20 PM   #10
Bert
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dark_Helmet

If the ISP gives you only one IP address, then you MUST use a router if more than one computer will share the connection.
Do they not have Network Address Translation (NAT Configuration) routers in the US? We have them in the UK.

No, the only real restriction is how man MAC Addresses (hardware addresses) the packets can be forwarded to and therefore how many machines can be registered as "trusted" to receive on the single IP address. Just thought I'd clear that up.

Bert
 
Old 02-25-2003, 10:56 AM   #11
bigjohn
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Hey Bert,

what you gonna go for when you pass the magic 1K posts, guru or addict?
 
Old 02-25-2003, 12:44 PM   #12
Bert
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Quote:
Originally posted by bigjohn
Hey Bert,

what you gonna go for when you pass the magic 1K posts, guru or addict?
I'm having a bit of a head crisis about that. The problem is, I don't consider myself an addict or a guru. It's taken me nearly 2 years to get a thousand posts as I generally only post when a) There are zero replies to a thread or b) when someone's got the wrong end of the stick altogether.

I have four options:

1) Addict
2) Guru
3) Post a poll and ask viewers to decide (which is a bit vain)
4) Start over again under a new name

Currently number 4 is the most likely. Which would you do bigjohn?

Bert
 
Old 02-26-2003, 04:41 PM   #13
bigjohn
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I seem to recall others asking why there couldn't be more of a choice.

Under my username it says "member" - except the only kind of member that I feel like is sometimes known as a "TOOL", and when it comes to anything linux related, I'm a right TOOL!

I suppose I'd go for addict, because I feel the use of "GURU" suggest a cross between Messr's Stallman and Torvalds.

At least ADDICT, just conjures up an image of someone who "just" posts a lot, not necessarily with answers.

regards

John

P.S. maybe go for your option 4 but call yourself "BERT THE UNFEASIBLY UNKNOWLEDGABLE" or "BERTWHOISSTILLBERTBUTNOTAGURUORADDICT"
 
Old 02-26-2003, 05:05 PM   #14
boreo
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Lol.. I'll go for the Guru One.. J/k.. I'm almost there too!!!
 
Old 02-26-2003, 05:11 PM   #15
Q*Bert
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I like your sense of humour, bigjohn!

Well, this is my first post as Q*Bert the newbie.

I'll no doubt be mistaken for a LNO member. Which is no problem. I *can't* become an addict because I'm not addicted to posting and I can't be a guru because that would make me lazy. My learning curve never flattens.

Bert (Q*Bert)

Last edited by Q*Bert; 02-26-2003 at 05:12 PM.
 
  


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