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Old 12-30-2012, 12:35 AM   #1
future_computer
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Red face Can I convert 32bit Linux to 64bit Linux?


Can I convert 32bit Linux to 64bit Linux? Without reinstalling.

I wrongly downloaded and installed the 32bit Opensuse,
my system has 8GB RAM, 32 bit OS does not support that.

Can I convert it to 64bit in linux?
 
Old 12-30-2012, 01:20 AM   #2
polpak
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Am NON-Technical...


Believe you need reinstall to avoid complications for change from 32bit to 64bit.

The change from 32 bit to 64 bit IMHO well worth making :-)


IF concerned at losing data, as part of installation (or earlier) create new root and home partitions, leaving your current 32 bit / and /home/(user)/ still available to boot to.


When your 64bit version installed and running into its' new / and /home/(username)/, you can mount the old /home/(username)/ and copy their data across.




Copying other use things can cause some ownership issues, however these can be resolved as they arise.
 
Old 12-30-2012, 01:39 AM   #3
polpak
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Before you proceed I assumed you did check :

Code:
linux-xfp4:~ # cat /etc/SuSE-release
openSUSE 12.1 (x86_64)
VERSION = 12.1
CODENAME = Asparagus
linux-xfp4:~ #
 
Old 12-30-2012, 02:41 AM   #4
future_computer
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I do not have important files,
so, can I convert it to 64bit?
How to do it?
 
Old 12-30-2012, 03:49 AM   #5
jdkaye
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The easiest solution might be to simply install a 64 bit system rather than trying to convert the 32 bit system. Why not just install the 64 bit system from scratch and repartition the entire disk? That will remove all traces of the earlier 32 bit system.
jdk
 
Old 12-30-2012, 04:52 AM   #6
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If you have your /home directory on a separate partition, you can leave it as it is. This will save your configurations you did as a normal user and your data.

Suse uses Yast for the configuration. You should try to find out if it is possible to store the settings you did in Yast (on an external disk or another partition) and import them later in your 64bit system, this avoids completely new configuration.

Don't forget to make a backup of your data.

markus

Last edited by markush; 12-30-2012 at 05:01 AM. Reason: typo
 
Old 12-30-2012, 04:59 AM   #7
ruario
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whilst their probably is some convoluted way to convert it will not be easy. If you are asking because you have assumed it will be simpler than a reinstall you assumed incorrectly. A reinstall will be far easier.
 
Old 12-30-2012, 05:49 AM   #8
jmc1987
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You can get all your ram on your system by using the PAE Kernel on a 32bit system.
 
Old 12-30-2012, 06:24 AM   #9
future_computer
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My version

daniel@dell:~> cat /etc/SuSE-release
openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 2 (i586)
VERSION = 12.3
CODENAME = Dartmouth

daniel@dell:~>
 
Old 12-30-2012, 07:41 AM   #10
TobiSGD
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Converting the system to 64 bit is not a trivial task and will include downloading of the 64 bit packages (I assume you are asking this because I remember that you have a volume-limited data-plan).
I would recommend to use the PAE kernel until your data-plan allows a larger download again and then re-install the system.
 
Old 12-30-2012, 09:10 AM   #11
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
I do not have important files,
so, can I convert it to 64bit?
How to do it?
Download a 64-bit version and install from scratch.

Converting without installing from scratch is theoretically possible. For an expert, I expect that would still be harder than installing from scratch. For a beginner, it would be effectively impossible.

Preserving your data and settings across a reinstall could be tricky. But you seem to be saying that is unnecessary.

Converting 32-bit Linux to use a PAE kernel to support 8GB is usually easy, much easier than reinstall from scratch. If preserving data or settings were an issue, I would suggest PAE instead. For most uses of Linux, 32-bit PAE performs as well on an 8GB system as 64-bit.
 
Old 12-30-2012, 09:23 AM   #12
future_computer
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Quote:
Converting 32-bit Linux to use a PAE kernel to support 8GB is usually easy,
How to do that?
 
Old 12-30-2012, 10:48 AM   #13
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
How to do that?
I see you are posting from Ubuntu, but asking about Opensuse. Installing packages is very different between Ubuntu and Opensuse. I assume you want the answer for Opensuse.

I believe Opensuse uses yum or yast to install packages. There is a kernel package for PAE. I don't know the name of it in OpenSuse, but that name should be easy to find with an online search or a yum command. The package probaby has both "kernel" and "PAE" in its name.

Once you know the name of the package the command to install it is simple. Let me guess the name is kernel-pae. The yum command to install it would be
yum install kernel-pae
There is a similar yast command, but I don't know yast.

Unlike almost all other Linux packages, a kernel package does not take effect until the first reboot after you install it.

Edit: I did a google search and found this page which lists various versions of "kernel-pae" for various version of Opensuse and lists various "kernel-PAE" for various versions of Fedora.
http://rpmfind.net/linux/rpm2html/se...ery=kernel-pae
Note the exact package name differs slightly between distributions.

yum or yast know which version is appropriate, so if you let them find and download "kernel-pae" you don't need to figure out which version you need. If you find and download the rpm file yourself (such as from the page I linked) and install it by other means (sorry my Opensuse knowledge has gaps here) then you do need to figure out the right version.

Last edited by johnsfine; 12-30-2012 at 11:05 AM.
 
  


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