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Old 01-03-2010, 09:34 PM   #1
Xzibit
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Question Can't install .Deb file or (package)


I'm using a new Distro and after installing it and randomly searching for help on websites on how to install a .Deb file using dpkg at the konsole/terminal it says Bash : dpkg: Command not found . how is this possible ? Do I have to know about all the packages in the package manager to install this. slight difference for me ... knowing what I have and knowing if I need Apr93-323? (whatever) installed first or not ? The only thing I know is that I have the Iso image installed ... which is my linux distro . Where to go from here? because I usually go to a website site to find Software to install ...if I need it .back to the basics
 
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Old 01-03-2010, 09:35 PM   #2
AlucardZero
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WHAT distro are you using and why can't you use its package manager so you don't have to do any work?
 
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Old 01-03-2010, 09:57 PM   #3
evo2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xzibit View Post
dpkg: Command not found . how is this possible ?
Perhaps your distro is not Debian based.

What is the Distribution? If you don't know, one of the two following commands will probably tell you.
Code:
cat /etc/*release
cat /etc/*version
Evo2.
 
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Old 01-03-2010, 10:03 PM   #4
itsbrad212
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Is your distro rpm based? If so, convert the deb to an rpm with alien.
 
Old 01-03-2010, 11:55 PM   #5
worm5252
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Xzibit,
Since you are fairly new to Linux you should probably know a few things. I know you are fairly new from our previous conversations we have had in the past.

First thing you should know is that there are really 2 main types of Linux. The 2 main types are RedHat based and Debian based distributions. Note this excludes BSD and Unix distributions. You will find RedHat based distributions use rpm packages. Debian based distributions will use deb packages. In either case you should understand what an rpm or deb file is. An rpm or deb file is a pre-compiled package designed for a specific distribution.

To help you understand a bit here are some RedHat based distributions
Fedora
yellowdog
ALT Linux
mandriva
suse

Now here are some Debian based distributions
Debian
Xandros
Knoppix
Vector Linux
DSL
Ubuntu
MEPIS

On a redhat based system you will you rpm or yum to install your packages. On a Debian based system you will use dpkg or apt-get to install your packages.

Here are a few Links that might help you out as a new user
Command Line basics, http://tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/html/sect_02_02.html
The Linux File System, http://tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/html/sect_02_02.html
The History of Linux, https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/rhasan/linux/

Also here are a few things to remember
-Windows user coming to Linux find Linux has a difficult learning curve. However new computer users find Linux is easier to use and learn than Windows. It is all a matter of how you interpret things
-Anyone who says Linux is free does not think their time is worth anything
-Somethings are different than other operating systems, even between distributions of Linux. However within Linux, you learn the basics and you can figure out the rest in no time.
-If you know DOS, then learning the Linux Command Line Interface (CLI) shouldn't be to hard. Many commands like ping and tracert are the same. some commands like ipconfig are only 1 letter off. In Linux it is ifconfig. Things like dir (Short for Directory) are not much different; in this case the Linux equivalent is ls (for List).

Last edited by worm5252; 01-03-2010 at 11:57 PM. Reason: correcting spelling errors. Darn Fat Fingers
 
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:40 AM   #6
craigevil
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PCLinuxOS uses Synaptic. Open it and search for thwtavere it is you are trying to install, if you do not find it then search the web for an rpm package or ask in the pclinuxos irc.
 
Old 01-04-2010, 07:26 AM   #7
archtoad6
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Code:
cat /etc/*{version,release,issue}*
is more compact & more comprehensive. Even better, try:
Code:
# find *nix distro/version/release info.

_divider () {
  echo -e "======================\n"$@"\n-----------------"
}

_execute () {
  _divider $@
  $@
}

# main line, pipable or redirectable
{
_execute  lsb_release -a

for X in  {/etc/*{release,version,issue}*,/proc/version}
do
   _divider $X
   cat $X
done

_execute  uname -a
}  | less -S
Edit:
Added code for /etc/*issue* to snippet & script. -- Thanks for the idea, worm5252.

Last edited by archtoad6; 01-07-2010 at 07:08 AM. Reason: add /etc/*issue* code
 
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Old 01-05-2010, 12:14 AM   #8
itsbrad212
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I guess we will have no answer...
 
Old 01-05-2010, 12:24 AM   #9
Xzibit
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Okay , Debian, BSD, Redhat and Unix Based . Why so many versions ? How do I make a choice ?
 
Old 01-05-2010, 02:39 AM   #10
Vypadkovyy
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actually... you've got a few more choices than that

if you want to stick with linux, you have debian based, red hat based, source based, or they have their own package manager (archlinux's pacman amongst others). There are so many versions because people want to do different things in different ways and those people are free to build their own systems

BSD, Solaris and the other Unixes are not linux and should really not be discussed in detail on this particular forum.


you obviously HAVE a distro installed... tell us what it is and we can help. I tend to like the .deb based distros myself, but there's no MAJOR disadvantage to using .rpms

Last edited by Vypadkovyy; 01-05-2010 at 02:41 AM.
 
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Old 01-05-2010, 03:25 AM   #11
evo2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xzibit View Post
Okay , Debian, BSD, Redhat and Unix Based . Why so many versions ? How do I make a choice ?
Umm, maybe you've forgotten, but you asked a question about why you couldn't install a deb file with dpkg. People requested more information so that they could answer your question. Do you still have this problem? Did you resovle it? Do you care to respond to the people who tried to help you?

Evo2.
 
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Old 01-05-2010, 12:55 PM   #12
worm5252
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My bad, I think my intro to Linux post I made threw him off.

Xzibit,
we need more information in order to help you with your issue. We need to know what distribution of Linux you are using. If you do not know off had you can run one of the following commands to find out.

Code:
cat /etc/*release
or

Code:
cat /etc/*version

Last edited by worm5252; 01-05-2010 at 12:55 PM. Reason: forgot a closing bracket on a code tag
 
Old 01-05-2010, 12:59 PM   #13
worm5252
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Here is another way. I use Debian and this is how I can verify on my system

Code:
jared@debian:~/Documents/Scripts/jobs$ cat /etc/issue
Debian GNU/Linux squeeze/sid \n \l
 
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Old 01-05-2010, 02:02 PM   #14
craigevil
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sorry double posted

Last edited by craigevil; 01-05-2010 at 02:03 PM.
 
Old 01-05-2010, 02:02 PM   #15
craigevil
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The OP is/was using PCLinuxOS or at least thats what he was running when he posted the OP.
Or at least thats what his browser reported.

PCLinuxOS can be found on IRC Freenode.* There are many channels setup; some are there for help and others for chat.* Please be sure to visit these channels according to your need or stop in and let us know what you think in our user chat channels!

Freenode #pclinuxos this channel is for general* user chat.
Freenode #pclinuxos-support the user support channel for PCLinuxOS
Freenode #pclinuxos-nl-be the PCLinuxOS Dutch IRC Channel

http://www.pclinuxos.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
 
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