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Old 03-02-2005, 09:48 PM   #1
Zerimas
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Can't SU


I am running DeLi Linux and I am unable to su to root as a normal user; can anyone help me?

Thanks in advance!
 
Old 03-02-2005, 09:53 PM   #2
jtshaw
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Make sure your user is in the wheel group.
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:45 PM   #3
Zerimas
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My user account is in the 'wheel' group.
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:45 PM   #4
Gibsonist
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can anybody explain to me why the group is called WHEEL in OpenBSD and several Linux Distros?
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:47 PM   #5
btmiller
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Root is the hub which is surrounded by a wheel of privileged users.

To the OP: what's the exact error message? Can you login to root normally (not via su)? Can you check that permissions on /bin/su are 4755 (-rwsr-xr-x)?
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:50 PM   #6
dsegel
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Short answer: it's a reference to "Big wheel", meaning somebody who is important. I'll try to find a link to more history. It's a carryover from old UNIX days.

Reference: http://www.redhat.com/archives/redha.../msg02358.html

As for the 'su' command - you may also need to add an entry to the /etc/sudoers file. With some distros you do this with a 'visudo' command, with others you can edit it directly.

Last edited by dsegel; 03-02-2005 at 10:59 PM.
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:54 PM   #7
Gibsonist
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Thanks for the bit of background
 
Old 03-02-2005, 10:55 PM   #8
emathias
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Try use sudo

Try to use "sudo" (http://www.courtesan.com/sudo/)

It's safer, because what an user does as root will be logged, and you can give difeerent permissions to the users.
There are Linux distr. (such as gentoo) that do not allow you to become root (it just can be made using something like sudo)
 
Old 03-02-2005, 11:00 PM   #9
dsegel
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Re: Try use sudo

Quote:
Originally posted by emathias
Try to use "sudo" (http://www.courtesan.com/sudo/)

It's safer, because what an user does as root will be logged, and you can give difeerent permissions to the users.
There are Linux distr. (such as gentoo) that do not allow you to become root (it just can be made using something like sudo)
Using 'sudo' instead of 'su' is great advice, but Gentoo most certainly lets you log in as root or become root via 'su' whenever you want. At least, in the normal configuration it does.
 
Old 03-03-2005, 02:48 AM   #10
GSX
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One question:


Code:
(-rwsr-xr-x) file...

What´s the meaning of the "s" in the file permissions?


Greetz
GSX
 
Old 03-03-2005, 05:58 PM   #11
Zerimas
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Thanks!

I took your advice and installed sudo and everything is working great; although I still need to do some fiddling around with my sudo config file.
 
Old 03-03-2005, 06:21 PM   #12
dsegel
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Quote:
Originally posted by GSX
One question:


Code:
(-rwsr-xr-x) file...

What´s the meaning of the "s" in the file permissions?


Greetz
GSX
It's the "set user or group ID on execution" bit. It sets the user or group to the appropriate value for the owner of the file when it is executing.
 
Old 03-04-2005, 07:09 AM   #13
GSX
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Thx for the info...

Greetz
GSX
 
  


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