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Old 10-31-2005, 05:55 PM   #1
cmlal
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Can't change privileges for my second harddrive even though I am root


Hi! (Again. ;))

Earlier today I had to re-install SuSE 10.0 because I couldn't get it to start again after having shut down the computer with a lot of applications still running (actually, they froze and I didn't know what to do). I know I shouldn't have shut it down like that but got impatient and I didn't think it would be such a problem.

Anyway. I re-mounted my other harddrive (which I unplugged when installing in an attempt to avoid messing it up, I keep all my important stuff on that one). It shows up fine and I can access the files - when changing user to root.

This is my problem: When I set privleges to allow all users to read and write files on that disk my system goes: Can not change permissions for /media/myharddrive/file. (Something like that, I use the Swedish version and have to translate the error message.)

I've tried moving the files, as root, from this harddrive to the other one, but all get is "Access denied for [file]".

It worked fine before I reinstalled.

Maybe I should format this drive or something? (But in order to do that I need to be able to move the files somewhere else.) It seems it has got some info on it that I can't change anymore? I dunno. I only started out with Linux one week ago. I really don't know what to do. I was so proud of having mounted it all by myself. And now this.

Any suggestions or thoughts on this problem would be greatly appreciated!
 
Old 10-31-2005, 06:33 PM   #2
Linux.tar.gz
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Try to tweak /etc/fstab
You can also install a real Linux distro like Slackware (joke... well, no!)
 
Old 10-31-2005, 09:01 PM   #3
BajaNick
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Try this in console as root. " chmod 777 /yourdirectory/yourfile "
Of course yourdirectory and file are whatever you need, But doing the above can have some security issues. If your looking to simply move the files and format, the above should give you the permissons to move them.
 
Old 11-01-2005, 03:09 AM   #4
cmlal
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Quote:
Originally posted by Linux.tar.gz
Try to tweak /etc/fstab
You can also install a real Linux distro like Slackware ;) (joke... well, no!)
I did add a line in fstab when mounting this harddisk:

Code:
/dev/hdb1 /media/Thenameofmydisk ntfs defaults,umask=000 0 0
Someone in some other thread on here gave that instruction to someone when s/he asked about mounting another disk. I don't fully understand what it means, so I couldn't tell if something needs to be removed or added.

Also, if Slackware has a live cd I am more than willing to give it a try. ;))
 
Old 11-01-2005, 03:13 AM   #5
cmlal
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Quote:
Originally posted by BajaNick
Try this in console as root. " chmod 777 /yourdirectory/yourfile "
Thanks for the tip! I did this on my disk as a whole "chmod 777 /media/Thenameofmydisk" because there are so many files on there, that there is no way I could do this for every file that won't be moved. It didn't work though, I'm afraid. I get the same error message when trying to move a dir. :/
 
Old 11-01-2005, 03:41 AM   #6
enemorales
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Quote:
I'm afraid. I get the same error message when trying to move a dir. :/
You what???? You shouldn't try to write in a NTFS partition on Linux. Reading is supported and safe, but writting NO (or it wasn't the last time I checked).
 
Old 11-01-2005, 04:04 AM   #7
cmlal
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Quote:
Originally posted by enemorales
You what???? You shouldn't try to write in a NTFS partition on Linux. Reading is supported and safe, but writting NO (or it wasn't the last time I checked).
Well. As I said: "I don't fully understand what it means, so I couldn't tell if something needs to be removed or added." I am a newbie, you'll have to explain to me what NTFS is and why I shouldn't try to write in it.
 
Old 11-01-2005, 06:55 AM   #8
cmlal
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So. I downloaded SLAX KillBill Edition v 5.0.6 just for kicks (and since
Linux.tar.gz suggested I'd try real distro :)) and for some reason when I ran it I was able to move the entire content of my second hard disk to my main one! No problems what so ever.

So, now, any suggestions as to how I should handle this second disk to avoid more problems? I can wipe it now if necessary.
 
Old 11-01-2005, 07:52 AM   #9
Linux.tar.gz
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WIndows handles (only) 2 filesystems + floppy fs (fat16 if i remember right).
The 2 fs are fat32 and ntfs.
Fat32 is fully supported by Linux so you should use it when you use multiboot.
Ntfs is more secure (!) and is partially supported by Linux. However, you can use it with some user-space programs like captive.
For my part i use only fat32 because i avoid headaches.
I don't know if cfdisk is included in Suse, but it's a nice tool to partition and format disk. There's also graphical tools .
 
Old 11-01-2005, 10:19 AM   #10
cmlal
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Thank you for the info! I will try this later. I have to move away from the computer now, it's beginning to take up way too much time. (But it's so much fun!)
 
Old 11-01-2005, 12:14 PM   #11
enemorales
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Quote:
Originally posted by cmlal
Well. As I said: "I don't fully understand what it means, so I couldn't tell if something needs to be removed or added." I am a newbie, you'll have to explain to me what NTFS is and why I shouldn't try to write in it.
Sorry, you didn't sound so newbie to me in the first post .

About what to do with your partition. It depends on what you want to do with your PC. If you plan to be microsoft free, sure you can remove the partition, create a new one and then format (instructions later). If you want to dual-boot and share file between the systems, format it as fat32 will allow you to read/write in the partition using both systems and without a problem.

Now, to delete, create, format, resize, etc, etc, there is a very nice gui tool called "qparted". It works like "Partition Magic".

On the other hand, since you are installing a "real distro", you may want to use the command line to manage this task. Then you can use a tool like "fdisk" (you can also use "cfdisk" if it comes with your distribution: it is better because it has menus and you can use the arrow to move, but I've found that it fails sometimes to do what I want it to, while "fdisk" is uglier, but more reliable). You will be running something like "fdisk /dev/hdb". You have done pretty good with Linux, so I think you'll be able to find out how to create a new partition. However, if after using "p" to see the partition table you do not have any idea about what you are seeing, give us a post here to help you further (notice you may decide to create several partitions also...)

In any case, fdisk (and cfdisk) won't format the partition for you, so after you use them you still have to use another command for that. Now, as in Windows you can fat32 and ntfs, in linux you can have (with full support): fat32, ext2, ext3, reiserfs, xfs, jfs, ... and several others. I'll recommend you to use either ext3 or reiserfs. To format the partition with ext3, you run "mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdb1" if you created only one partition.

I hope this helps you a little. I know I wasn't very helpful in the previous post. Sorry again and good luck with Linux. Again, you are doing pretty fine, I guess...
 
Old 11-01-2005, 03:46 PM   #12
cmlal
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Quote:
Originally posted by enemorales
I hope this helps you a little. I know I wasn't very helpful in the previous post. Sorry again and good luck with Linux. Again, you are doing pretty fine, I guess...
Oh, no problem, you sure made up for it by posting these very informative suggestions on what to do next. :) Thank you!

I'm going away for a few days so I won't try this right away but I'm sure I'll have a few follow up questions later.

I got rid of Windows when I installed SuSE and it's been a little over a week. I have a lot to learn but it's fun. Thanks a lot for the encouragement!
 
Old 11-03-2005, 04:11 AM   #13
cmlal
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Question

Ok, so I've had a few days to think about what I want to do, and I've come up with this.

Since I reinstalled SuSE 10.0 it seems a bit unstable. The sounds works (when playing the default sounds for shutting down and things like that) but I can no longer play mp3s with the software that comes with KDE (it's a shame because I really like amaroK) and after having installed Wine just now I can't browse the .wine/dosdevices directory. Konqueror just crashes. Things like that.

I'd like to make my second hard drive a reliable back up/storage place again, I don't quite trust it at the moment. Should I format? (That's what I'd do in Windows, I don't know what would be the proper thing to do in this case.) Then move all my important stuff back on it. And after that wipe everything off of the main hard drive and reinstall (possibly Ubuntu or Slackware, maybe dual boot if I can pull that off, I'll try a few live cd's before deciding). Make a fresh start.

How does this sound? I just really want it to work. Stability is key.
 
Old 11-03-2005, 05:49 AM   #14
Linux.tar.gz
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...And Slackware the answer. I tried many distros before beeing so affirmative.
1- You get the best distro.
2- You learn the best way.
 
  


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