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Old 06-30-2013, 10:15 AM   #1
atlantis43
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c programming freeware


Wondering if anyone can recommend freeware useful for learning C programming (V99). I see that some people use something called Ubuntu, but I'm not sure what that is. (It seems to be a complete OS).
I'm using WindowsXP Pro on a pc, and don't want to replace the OS. I currently am using a trial version of VMWare Player, which is the type of system I'd like to duplicate, as my trial period is running out.
I guess I need a compiler, with gcc, and whatever else that is necessary.
Any recommendations would be appreciated
 
Old 06-30-2013, 10:32 AM   #2
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I think pretty much any Linux distro (of which Ubuntu is one) will have a c compiler. Just take you pick. A typical way is to burn some liveCD's of various distros and go with the one you prefer.

jdk
 
Old 06-30-2013, 10:50 AM   #3
atlantis43
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jdkaye;
what does liveCD mean? (sorry for my terminology ignorance).
Do you recommend any particular one of these Linux distros?

Last edited by atlantis43; 06-30-2013 at 10:50 AM. Reason: spelling
 
Old 06-30-2013, 11:47 AM   #4
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im currently taking a class on C. our professor likes students to use http://sourceforge.net/projects/dev-cpp/ Dev-C++ it is a free tool that provides all of the libraries and compiler for C that you will need to use in MS Windows.

I personally just use my iMac with gedit to program, but if you are not able to run Linux or dont own a Mac, Dev-C++ will work just fine for you.
 
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:07 PM   #5
atlantis43
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took a look at the sourceforge product, and its very dissimilar to what I've been using, but looks adequate after I learn to use it. Is there any 'terminal' displayed with this product?
How do I access GDB?
Wondering if anyone can explain what the difference is between a product like this and a "Virtual Machine", such as VMWare provides.
 
Old 06-30-2013, 02:10 PM   #6
atlantis43
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-----and, by the way, what are " Code: blocks"?
 
Old 06-30-2013, 02:12 PM   #7
jkirchner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantis43 View Post
-----and, by the way, what are " Code: blocks"?
Code Blocks provides a very nice ide, and, if you are on Windows you can download it with a compiler so everything just works. I use it on my Windows boxes. Great way to lear and free software: Get it at CodeBlocks website
 
Old 06-30-2013, 02:35 PM   #8
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last question about Code:Blocks was due to the fact that someone had commented that Sourceforge compiler would be good if there were some way to disable Code:blocks-------so I guess I already have it.
 
Old 06-30-2013, 03:11 PM   #9
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To answer the question about virtual machines: A virtual machine is exactly what it sounds like -- it's a computer created in software that can run an operating system like Linux or Windows within an already running operating system.
How are you using VMWare player? If you just want a free version of that then VirtualBox may work for you though I hear it can be a little slower than VMWare.
 
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Old 06-30-2013, 05:14 PM   #10
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Yes. that's probably just what I'm looking for. Do you know if it has the same features as the VMWare Player, just slower?
 
Old 06-30-2013, 06:20 PM   #11
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Old 07-01-2013, 01:02 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantis43 View Post
Yes. that's probably just what I'm looking for. Do you know if it has the same features as the VMWare Player, just slower?
It's a while since I've played with VMWare so o'm not sure of the exact differences, you can check the features out here: https://www.virtualbox.org/
 
Old 07-01-2013, 11:08 AM   #13
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Just IMHO, but to me nothing trumps having just Linux installed to practice/learn C. I recommend you find a secondary computer which you don't use much and then put either Ubuntu, SUSE, or MINT on it. Make sure you have gcc installed, which most of them do.

Why do I say this? Couple of reasons:
  1. The environment is all there, the compiler (gcc) and the debugger (gdb)
  2. Library calls which you need reference on, such as memcpy, strcmp, printf, and so forth are easily accessible via the man pages
  3. All system resources are easily accessible; such as /dev/ttyS0, and so forth, try to find the COM port on Windows when you don't know which one it is and you'll rapidly find that not programming from within Microsoft's libraries is a huge problem using their OS
  4. You can compile one file using one command, a call to gcc; from the command line. No GUI, no "projects", and so forth, I've seen how daunting it can be to just want to compile one lousy file in Visual Studio. Sure a console project is the simplest there, but they probably create 20 support files just to do that. Very wasteful for small stuff, but to give them a bit of recognition, I do program in VS for MS GUI applications, and do prefer that over other stuff meant for Windows UI development.
 
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Old 07-01-2013, 02:03 PM   #14
atlantis43
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RTMistler:
I understand that ubuntu can be installed in a Window OS. Do you know anything about this, particularly as to whether it might cause problems with the apps that are already installed. As I have only one pc (with no plans to get another) this might be the best solution in terms of what you advise.
Richard
 
Old 07-01-2013, 02:08 PM   #15
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Download the ISO for whatever distribution you want to use, install VirtualBox, set up a VM with the RAM and number of processors you want to give it, give it the ISO file location, install the OS inside the VM, and then you're done.

This is only feasible if you have enough computer resources (namely RAM) to facilitate running two OSs simultaneously.
 
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