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Old 10-10-2004, 09:07 PM   #16
nomenclator
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spoody_goon I'm not understanding what I'm seeing at http://iso.linuxquestions.org/version.php?version=71

What are the iso numbers? What are the links to? What are the percentages? What is what percent of what? Numbers by themselves mean nothing. They are like adjectives. having a number all by itself is like having an adjective all by itself. It means nothing. If you just see the word "old" you are not informed about anything. An old car is different than an old city. there is not way to tell whether someone is talking about a city or a car, if they just say "old."
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:08 PM   #17
nomenclator
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What does "plan free" mean?

On the page you linked me to, what does LQ ISO mean? What do "RSS" and "ATOM" mean in the context of that page? All my science and math teachers have always nagged me to please label my charts and graphs -- and they were right. They mean nothing if they aren't labelled.

Come to think of it, I don't think I know what "free at some level" means either. Either something is free, or it is not free.


Last edited by nomenclator; 10-10-2004 at 09:23 PM.
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:37 PM   #18
nomenclator
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The FreeBSD page, here, says FreeBSD is derived from BSD, which is a version of Unix. It doesn't say FreeBSD is a version of Linux. I thought Linux was a version of Unix also. If that is so, then it seems is FreeBSD a kind of Linux, or is it only a kind of Unix?

Also, why is this web site a Linux web site as opposed to being a general Unix web site? Does what I read here apply only to Linux versions of Unix, and not other versions of Unix?
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:40 PM   #19
spoody_goon
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I'm just trying to help you. The link I gave you is for free iso avalible from Linux Questions. Also take a look at the Distro review page located on the main menu at the top of this page.
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:45 PM   #20
nomenclator
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spoody_goon: " take a look at the Distro review page located..."

I didn't see FreeBSD listed there.
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:49 PM   #21
nomenclator
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" The link I gave you is for free iso"

What is an "iso" ??
 
Old 10-10-2004, 09:49 PM   #22
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try this http://liw.iki.fi/liw/texts/linux-the-big-picture.html
an iso is an image file used to write bootable cd

Last edited by spoody_goon; 10-10-2004 at 09:52 PM.
 
Old 10-10-2004, 10:25 PM   #23
nomenclator
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http://liw.iki.fi/liw/texts/linux-the-big-picture.html -- doesn't say whether FreeBSD is Linux or just unix. Does it make a lot of difference? I'm finding the installation directions for FreeBSD to be understandable and the installation directions for other unix distributions to be incomprehensible.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 12:29 AM   #24
BaltikaTroika
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I'd recommend you go to the link he gave you and download all three ISOs for Mandrake. Burn them to three CDs (I use Nero under Windows), put the first disc in the drive and restart your computer (after, of course, backing up your information first).

It will launch the installation process which is VERY easy! You'll have an easy to use and fully functioning Linux system running in less than an hour (I think it's about half that, actually). I'd even say that you can get this installed without worrying too much about documentation, as well, as long as you have a pretty good understanding of computers in general.

This will ask you if you want to partition your drive and if you want to install a boot loader (so you can run more than one OS on your computer).

Mandrake is not only easy to install, but very easy to use on a daily basis.

If you're not entirely sure you want to run Linux, you could always start off playing around with a Knoppix disc (also freely downloadable).

BaltikaTroika
 
Old 10-11-2004, 03:12 AM   #25
mjjzf
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I made a comment on Mandrake here - it may be of use to you. Mandrake is free, except the CDs you burn it on. If you buy it from the Mandrakelinux.org, it is not a price tag as much as it is a donation to the Mandrake Community. There is a 3 CD download. There is a 4th CD which is reserved for MandrakeClub members, but you won't need it to get the system up.
Yes, the Mandrake installer is graphical, and no, that doesn't make it cheaper. It is a solid tool. It also installs the boot loader, so every time you boot up your PC, you are asked whether you want to start in Linux or Windows, if you are dual-booting: Running two systems on the same PC. You can see the install procedure illustrated here. The standard bootscreen as illustrated on slide 25 will include Windows, if you are dual-booting.
I support the idea that you should download and try Knoppix, since it will let you try Linux without actually installing it. Runs best from a decent PC, though, since it basically runs from RAM.
As for the BSD issue, they are a fork of the original Unix, as far as I know - whereas Linux was a parallel system, but programmed against Unix standards.

Last edited by mjjzf; 10-11-2004 at 03:45 AM.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 08:02 AM   #26
nomenclator
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No one has answered my question aboutt FreeBSD; is free BSD a version of Linux or is it a version of Unix, or both?

http://www.freebsd.org/
 
Old 10-11-2004, 09:39 AM   #27
BaltikaTroika
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AFAIK, although I've never tried it myself, FreeBSD is not a "version of Linux", it's sort of an offshoot of Unix, as is Linux itself.

From this very website, "Other, similar efforts like FreeBSD and NetBSD have been technically successful but never caught fire the way Linux has; as this is written in 2003, Linux has effectively swallowed all proprietary Unixes except Solaris and is seriously challenging Microsoft. It has already captured 41% of the Internet-server market and over 25% of general business servers."

Also, 0SourceDiplomat just wrote: "As for the BSD issue, they are a fork of the original Unix, as far as I know - whereas Linux was a parallel system, but programmed against Unix standards."

I personally don't know anything about FreeBSD, as I have stuck playing around with Linux. Considering how popular Linux is, you'll probably have more luck finding people familiar with whichever Linux distro it is that you'll use than with FreeBSD (maybe not true, but that's my feeling). I do believe, though, that the common origins of all unix-style/unix-based OSes give you the foundation to understand how to use all of the others.

I'd stick with the most popular, easiest to use distribution of Linux that you can find... at least at first. When you become more comfortable, maybe then you can feel more confident in trying new experiences...

Baltika
 
Old 10-11-2004, 09:59 AM   #28
nomenclator
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Thanks for the info, BaltikaTroika. Very helpful info.

However, i did find the installation instructions at the freeBSD website, http://www.freebsd.org/ to be much much easier for me to comprehend, and follow, than any of the instructions I've found elsewhere, for any of the Linux distributions. There just seemed to be no comparison. FreeBSD's instructions seemed to be in plain English, the instructions for all the Linux distributions I've seen, at least 4 or 5 by now, all seemed to be a tangled heap of obtuse jargon.

For example the page at http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...k/install.html looks like plain English to me, the page at http://iso.linuxquestions.org/version.php?version=71, which spoody_goon refered me to before, looks like obtuse jargon to me. It will be hours and hours before I figure out what is going on at the latter, if ever. The former -- I can understand and follow the instruction right away. I don't see any comparison.

BaltikaTroika writes
Quote:
I'd stick with the most popular, easiest to use distribution of Linux
given what I've indicated so far, about downloading and installing the operating systems, I don't see how you can conclude that Mandrake is easier to use than FreeBSD.

Last edited by nomenclator; 10-11-2004 at 10:23 AM.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 04:43 PM   #29
BaltikaTroika
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That Linux link isn't really to instructions at all... it looks confusing, but really isn't. It's a list of sites where you can get the three ISOs. If you're in North America (or Europe, Asia, etc), just find a mirror (one of the links) listed on the left which is located in your continent (I don't know for sure, but imagine that 100% just means that you should have a better chance at downloading quickly with no problems). The ISOs are linked at the right. Download all three - it'll take up about 2 gig on your hard drive just for the images. You can delete them once you've written them to a disc - see my next point...

You must burn each ISO to it's own disc (your burning program will have a "Burn Image" option - don't just copy the image to a disc!!), put disc 1 in your drive and reboot. The install routine will begin and you just have to answer a few questions and that's about it! You'll have Linux running in no time!

See? You can actually do this with NO written documentation!!

How's that for easy? Just download the ISOs, burn them to disc, pop one in your drive, reboot, and in less than an hour you'll have Linux running! It's almost like the old days of installing Windows or DOS... you just have to tell it a few things, then from there, it's just swapping discs while it installs everything you want.

Baltika
 
Old 10-11-2004, 04:45 PM   #30
BaltikaTroika
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Ratings

I just checked out that link in more detail... the % listed is a rating given by people who have downloaded from that site.

If they have no problems and it's nice and fast, they rate it higher... if they have problems, they give it a low rating. So it might be safer to use the site with the highest percentage - it's basically showing you how satisfied users have been with that site's performance.

Baltika
 
  


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