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Old 03-06-2016, 06:27 PM   #1
Plod
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Booting from USB Drive - How to retain WiFi password


I have to re-enter my rather long password each time I boot up. Is there any way I can avoid this please?.
 
Old 03-06-2016, 08:54 PM   #2
michaelk
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I assume you are running Mint.

If you are running a live USB version without persistence then nothing is saved upon shutdown.

I've never tried this but to add persistence you would need to create a second partition using ext2 as the file system type and set the Label to casper-rw.

You can also install Mint to the USB drive as a regular installation instead of a live version.
 
Old 03-06-2016, 09:14 PM   #3
Plod
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That sounds beyond this noob. I created the USB Linux Mint 17.2 using UNetbootin and was unaware of the term persistence.

But I am learning fast and I guess that is what makes Linux interesting.

Last edited by Plod; 03-06-2016 at 09:15 PM.
 
Old 03-06-2016, 09:41 PM   #4
michaelk
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A live version even though it was installed on a USB drive runs from memory. Some live versions have the capability of saving settings and installed programs to a file or partition and that is called persistence.
 
Old 03-06-2016, 09:48 PM   #5
yancek
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Space used to preserve files across reboots is shown when you open unetbootin. See the second image at the unetbootin home page below. Since Mint is derived from Ubuntu, this works for Mint. This just creates a file up to a maximum of 4GB. If you want more, you need to create a casper-rw partition with a Linux filesystem.

http://unetbootin.github.io/
 
Old 03-07-2016, 04:08 PM   #6
jefro
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Unetbootin is a good newbie way to start learning. While the persistence file (casper) is a good way to make it appear that you are saving data there is a slight downside to this. The original data is in a compressed file. Things that may need to be updated can't be properly updated. These compressed files have an advantage in speed.

Your next step may be to create a usb drive that has linux installed just as if it were a real hard drive. It would act and function like a normal hard drive on many modern systems. You should buy a very fast usb flash drive for a normal install.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 05:05 PM   #7
BW-userx
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I'd look in to puppy Linux and all of the little puppies that came out of it. their is many to pick from, 32bit to 64bit that where created just for this type of usage.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 06:58 PM   #8
Plod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
Unetbootin is a good newbie way to start learning. While the persistence file (casper) is a good way to make it appear that you are saving data there is a slight downside to this. The original data is in a compressed file. Things that may need to be updated can't be properly updated. These compressed files have an advantage in speed.

Your next step may be to create a usb drive that has linux installed just as if it were a real hard drive. It would act and function like a normal hard drive on many modern systems. You should buy a very fast usb flash drive for a normal install.
Thanks for that advice. In my ignorance I thought using Unetbootin would install Linux Mint onto the USB drive and it would act as you describe. Quite a learning curve for this old-timer.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 07:00 PM   #9
Plod
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Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
I'd look in to puppy Linux and all of the little puppies that came out of it. their is many to pick from, 32bit to 64bit that where created just for this type of usage.
What would be the advantage as I am quite happy with Linux Mint at present.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 07:20 PM   #10
BW-userx
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Originally Posted by Plod View Post
What would be the advantage as I am quite happy with Linux Mint at present.
not one lousy bit forget I suggest it...
viva la MINT

figure out a work around if you cannot get persistent to work. a file with your password on it that you can get to so all you have to do is copy paste it instead of having to write out out every time perhaps.

Last edited by BW-userx; 03-07-2016 at 07:28 PM.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 09:00 PM   #11
Plod
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Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
not one lousy bit forget I suggest it...
viva la MINT
LOL. That is a possible solution or I could stop being lazy and just type in my password whilst I am trying out linux.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 09:27 PM   #12
OregonJim
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What would be the advantage as I am quite happy with Linux Mint at present.
Not necessarily an advantage (that's up to you to decide), but here's what makes Puppy different:

Puppy runs entirely out of RAM. In fact, once booted, you can remove the USB stick altogether and run with NO disks attached! This makes it run much faster than other distros as well. When you shutdown/reboot, Puppy gives you the option to save an image of RAM, including any changes you made (like storing the WiFi password). Next time you boot, it picks up where you left off. You can choose not to save as well, in which case all your changes go away. You can decide whether to save/not save for every session. Puppy can also be installed in the conventional way to a hard disk like all other distros, but its uniqueness is in the run-from-RAM functionality.
 
Old 03-07-2016, 09:27 PM   #13
BW-userx
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Originally Posted by Plod View Post
LOL. That is a possible solution or I could stop being lazy and just type in my password whilst I am trying out linux.
if you're just trying out, then burn another one and try whats next on the list, you have not even scratch the surface ... keep going ...

http://distrowatch.com/
 
Old 03-08-2016, 03:40 PM   #14
Plod
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Originally Posted by OregonJim View Post
Not necessarily an advantage (that's up to you to decide), but here's what makes Puppy different:

Puppy runs entirely out of RAM. In fact, once booted, you can remove the USB stick altogether and run with NO disks attached!
That sounds interesting and I will give it a try. Thanks.
 
Old 03-08-2016, 03:45 PM   #15
Plod
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Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
if you're just trying out, then burn another one and try whats next on the list, you have not even scratch the surface ... keep going ...
I will do as you suggest. I am enjoying the new challenge of Linux.
 
  


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