LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-10-2010, 07:10 AM   #1
RamsesIV
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: somewhere in Belgium
Distribution: RedHat/CentOS, OpenSUSE, Solaris
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
Angry BIOS does not recognize bootable disk


Anyone here knows the OpenSuse install CD runthrough?
I am using DELL pc's, and remember installing Linux as being a few almost basic steps on my self assembled clone pc's in my youth.
Now, over ten years later I want to redo that and return to my old playground. I am using after over 12 years administering MS stuff again applications running on unix (solaris) at my work. Its like homecoming but in a difficult way, I am brainwashed and not really into unix anymore. So... lets install linux again at home.
Returning to my favorite Suse distribution in the old days (who knows why ). I went through the installation (Opensuse11) simple, standard to start with, so mainly next (ACPI disabled). Rebooted... and the pc finds no recognized bootable HDD. Whate the he**? OK, well, try again, other HDD to be sure, results in the same. Set manually the root partition as active. No go, I feel as a newbie again. What happened to me in those last years???
Oh yeah, tried to do it also with a fedora distri - same outcome.
When plugging these HDD in another recent (DELL) pc, it also does not recognize the HDD as bootable.
Both disks have been part of a system before and functioned; untill I changed this system for this other purpose. Probably i am missing something basic??

Last edited by RamsesIV; 05-10-2010 at 07:16 AM.
 
Old 05-10-2010, 07:21 AM   #2
Simon Bridge
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Waiheke NZ
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9,211

Rep: Reputation: 198Reputation: 198
Welcome to LQ.

Lets see if I have this right - you have successfully installed OpenSUSE 11 to your HDD right?
You are trying to boot for the first time?

I need to know how far through the boot process you got exactly - are you telling me that the POST message is "no bootable disks" or is it a GRUB message?

Did you remember to write the bootloader to the MBR?
Did you set the jumpers?

Have you attempted to examine the drives using a live distro or the rescue mode in fedora or opensuse?
 
Old 05-10-2010, 08:00 AM   #3
RamsesIV
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: somewhere in Belgium
Distribution: RedHat/CentOS, OpenSUSE, Solaris
Posts: 5

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Arrow

Indeed, installation to HDD, trying to boot for first time. Getting POST message.
I did manually check the GRUB loader to overwrite MBR.
Yep, master on ide cable is set OK. I use the same disks as used/functioning before in this system.

As first action after this reply I will already check overwrite MBR again, pretty sure I checked this manually at second try though. You never know. I was already blaming the branded pc's in my thoughts....
 
Old 05-10-2010, 09:10 AM   #4
Simon Bridge
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Waiheke NZ
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9,211

Rep: Reputation: 198Reputation: 198
Have you attempted to examine the drives using a live distro or the rescue mode in fedora or opensuse?

Note: this problem is occurring even before you get to grub, let alone linux.
Did you check the drive order in bios?

Have a look at:
http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=223747

which branded pc?
 
Old 05-11-2010, 12:16 AM   #5
ArthurSittler
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2008
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 124

Rep: Reputation: 30
Bootable in BIOS as well as partition table?

There are two places you need to tell your computer that a disk is bootable:
in the computer BIOS, and
in the partition table.

I don't use the same distribution as you use. I usually go with Debian or Slackware.

Somewhere in the process of installing Linux, you use fdisk or cfdisk to partition the drive and make some partition bootable. Can you boot Linux from the CD and use fdisk or cfdisk to look at the partition table? Is the appropriate partition of the hard drive marked bootable?

When you install the Linux kernel on the drive, you may have a choice between installing into the master boot record or into the boot sector of a partition on the drive. Installing lilo in the mbr has usually worked for me, but in some cases this has made the disk unbootable.

I usually use the option to make a boot floppy or, in more recent systems, a boot thumb drive, when installing Linux. In most cases I was able to boot the system from the boot disk (or thumb drive) and install lilo to make the system bootable.

You also will configure your boot sequence in the computer BIOS. Does the BIOS include that hard drive in its boot sequence?

Some times I found it necessary to make sure that the Linux hard drive was first in the boot device list or second following only the CDROM even though the BIOS seemed to indicate that it would look through several devices. It quit trying before it made it down to the hard drive even though the earlier devices had no media installed. This was a BIOS issue, not a Linux issue. It would not boot a hard drive loaded with any other operating system unless it was early enough in the boot sequence.

Finally, due to limitations in the BIOS, you may need to force Linux to put the kernel image and certain other related files close to the start of the drive. The BIOS routines limit how much of the disk they can access because the earliest PCs imposed ridiculously severe limitations on the sector number and cylinder number in its description of disk geometry. I don't know whether newer versions of Linux or more recent BIOS still have these limitations. I force Linux to put the kernel and related files near the start of the disk by allocating a small partition at the beginning of the drive and mounting that partition on /boot when I install Linux. This is no more than three or four logical cylinders. Early in the boot process, the boot loader uses the BIOS routines to read in the first parts of the system. Since those parts of the OS are in /boot, they are in the boot partition, near the beginning of the drive. I mark the boot partition as the bootable partition.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dell BIOS often doesn't recognize devices any more! blue penguin General 3 11-13-2005 07:24 AM
bootable cd won't boot - bios error? scouser_steve Linux - General 4 06-27-2005 09:37 AM
Partitioned HD. Bios Doesn't Recognize CDROM Anymore flamesrock Linux - Hardware 3 10-30-2004 07:21 AM
bios wont recognize HD, is it possible to use? iluvatar Linux - Hardware 28 07-23-2004 04:10 AM
Does BIOS really need to recognize correct HDD size? ikletti Linux - Hardware 1 09-24-2003 06:13 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:20 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration