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Old 09-19-2016, 08:11 AM   #16
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docsmr View Post
I'm in the process of focusing on my IT career after a 20-year break. I used to be a network engineer (Windows, Netware) with some Linux background before changing careers. I'm finding I miss what I used to be and would like to go back to it but my skills are somewhat outdated. Looking around at various Linux jobs, books and at the forums here, I am finding there are a lot of options for training and learning Linux, most of them out of reach financially. Some positions require certifications while others do not. All of my financial resources would be out of pocket since this has nothing to do with my current job and those resources are very limited. So my question is, what are the best resources (books,free courses ???) for learning Linux and what certifications should I pursue so that I can obtain a Linux job? I am in the process of taking the free Intro to Linux class on edx but that is pretty much a refresher class for me. I have installed the Ubuntu distribution on a laptop.
20 years ago you were a network engineer? Meaning what? Configuring computers for persons to use? That would be the mid-90s, personal computers were widely in use, but not also discounting mainframe type of systems.

Some people counteract this advice/mindset when I raise it, but it really is a starting point to consider. And it either applies versus not.

That mindset is "college graduate y/n?". As a starting point it is helpful if you have one, and really any one, because it demonstrates to an employer that you are capable of completing a difficult, and organized long term, committed program, even if it was 20+ years ago. If not, then not.

I suspect that this whole process you are embarking on may be somewhat difficult, no matter what your background.

Degree vs. not, I feel you should try to attain a position, or a fringe/gateway position intended to get you closer to your goal. Set a personal goal to give a gateway position some frame of time, 6 months or a year to learn something. If you're learning and have great prospects and like the career direction it is taking you, then pleasant surprise and continue. If you feel you can stretch farther, then look for better work, but do so with the earned credentials from your (now) present job and the personal work you've put in on your own projects.

I personally do not feel that certifications are the best gateway, they however may be worth something to some employers. I also feel that those employers may sponsor training if they feel it to be of worth. Meanwhile I also feel that once you do achieve such a level of certification, it will no longer be useful to you except to say that you have it. For instance I can argue that my college degree is only useful in that I have it, otherwise all my skills have mainly been learned in my work experiences. So at some point, once having completed that training, the fact that the training was there is worth a bit, mainly when you're looking for a new job; however over time the content of the training becomes "what you make of it".
 
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:34 AM   #17
docsmr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
20 years ago you were a network engineer? Meaning what? Configuring computers for persons to use? That would be the mid-90s, personal computers were widely in use, but not also discounting mainframe type of systems.
Mid to late 90's configuring networks using Novell Netware for over 300 computers and numerous printers for several offices over a local area network. Also supported a wide area network across the nation so it was a little more than setting up computers for people to use. We had several servers running at the time so I am familiar with how networks are setup, just has been a very long time.
 
Old 09-22-2016, 06:06 AM   #18
chrism01
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Quote:
Does CentOS have a server installation? I only saw a desktop version but I see Fedora has a server version.
Actually they both have the pkgs available to be either or both.
Effectively, Fedora is Redhat's R&D distro; stuff tried there (think beta) often ends up in RHEL (& therefore Centos) later.

As for Certs:

1. a lot of adverts/HR etc ask for them
2. RHEL Cert test is at least a full hands on test (sans internet or books) under time pressure.
If you put in the work at home, you can skip the course and just pay for the exam.
 
Old 09-22-2016, 07:06 AM   #19
malekmustaq
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Quote:
So my question is, what are the best resources (books,free courses ???) for learning Linux and what certifications should I pursue so that I can obtain a Linux job? I am in the process of taking the free Intro to Linux class on edx but that is pretty much a refresher class for me. I have installed the Ubuntu distribution on a laptop.
Certificates cannot solve system problems. There is no need to have one if you can make your mark in *what you can accomplish* with Gnu/Linux systems/networks. Generally, an employer is interested in what you *can* perform --rather than what a piece of none-degree paper says about you.

CLUE:
Get a book and build your own Linux From Scratch. You will gain more experience there than from what you get from commercial instructors. If you were on networks way back Windows/Novel then good because not much has changed about TCP/IP v4 today, if indeed you understood that protocol already. There is a free TCP/IP book available on web. Thus, when your LFS runs, begin controlling the network from shell or terminal and then SSH.

That is the shortest way to mastery of Gnu/Linux systems/networks in the most economical means.

Hope that helps. Good luck.

m.m.
 
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Old 09-22-2016, 09:00 AM   #20
goumba
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The certificate means nothing to the right employer, and to those who want some sort of likewise credential, they end up hiring the wrong people.

I never finished college, which in the NYC area means I couldn't find a decent tech job when I tried, as everyone wanted a college degree or the like. I had a childhood friend who did graduate with a college degree in computer science, getting a job with Computer Associates (later, McAfee). However, it really did mean nothing, as every time he had some obscure issue, guess who he came to for help? At the time I was just as well versed with Win as with Linux. Had his employer known about his lack of knowledge, perhaps he'd not have had the job no matter what degree he held.

I would like to think that climate has changed. Prove to any prospective employer you can do the job required, and you're better off than someone who shows up with that document and little to no experience.

I agree with the above about LFS. While there are some distributions that require a lot of hand work and manual configuration, LFS requires you to do everything the hard way and you're not going to learn any better way.

Last edited by goumba; 09-22-2016 at 09:04 AM.
 
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