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Old 07-26-2011, 12:34 AM   #1
alvinfigueroa
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Best Linux OS


hi guys, i just wanna ask if what kind of linux is the best to use for corporate system? is it redhut? mint? solaris? ubuntu? im confuse on where i'm going to focus. any advice? thnak you very much.
 
Old 07-26-2011, 12:51 AM   #2
sag47
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Depends on what you mean. Though this question may be taboo for flame wars hehe. There's still a few unknowns which you haven't provided such as whether or not you need a support contract which could change some peoples mind as to which is the "best".

There's definitely a few things we all agree on around here though. You should run multiple layers of security such as SELinux which is available for any distrobution and that you should probably read the Linux Administrators Guide. Generally speaking, once you get under the hood, the core GNU/Linux tools don't change much; it just matters how you go about configuring your system.

Personally I find that RedHat/Fedora are my favorite servers to run headless but I normally choose (K)Ubuntu for desktops.

There's also a matter of semantics for how you handle the system. Such as monitoring like Nagios/Icinga/Zenoss/OpenNMS down to log file management such as Splunk/Jasper/LogAnalyzer/or using core gnu tools.

At any rate I kind of went off on a ramble so RedHat or Fedora would be my choice with SELinux installed with a policy, SSH with root disabled, and iptables set up as a Firewall only allowing essential ports (and watchdog for core mission critical services).

Read the Linux Admin's Guide and you'll do fine.

Last edited by sag47; 07-26-2011 at 10:10 PM.
 
Old 07-26-2011, 01:09 AM   #3
Tinkster
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Hi, welcome to LQ!

Firstly, Solaris is NOT Linux. :}

Secondly: how long is a piece of string? sag47's advice on security
can't be emphasised enough, but as to which distro you want to go
with, that's like asking a range of people what the best sport or
their favourite car is - there's no one answer. You need to try,
and find what your preference is.

Mine is Slackware; at work I'm fairly happy w/ RedHat.


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-26-2011, 11:15 AM   #4
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alvinfigueroa View Post
Best Linux OS...what kind of linux is the best to use for corporate system?
While you might get an answer for 'What is the Best Linux OS?', if someone does decide to tell you what it is, you can immediately disregard what they say. There isn't a single best one, although you might find a fairly short list of appropriate candidates for a particular circumstance. (Or not, depending on what that circumstance is.)

'Corporate' does narrow it down a bit, but you don't say whether you mean 'server' or 'desktop' and whether you want a support contract.

For a server, you might think about Red Hat/Centos/Scientific, SLES or Debian, Ubuntu Server. There might also be a case for a more 'appliance' kind of distro, such as Engarde, Openwall, SME Server, StartComm, Superb, Untangle, Vyatta, Zentyal, depending on what you are trying to achieve.

For a desktop, I'd have a completely different list. Probably the easiest way forward would be to try to identify whether there are any existing corporate services (eg, Outlook, AD?) with which you know that you have to integrate. If you can work that out, you may be able to close in on the services and apps that will prove necessary for you, and that might lead you to a short list of distros that integrate the appropriate software. Or not.

Alternatively, you might be asking 'Are there good Linux distros, which I could use as a learning exercise, just in case the corporate for which I work goes over top a more Linux-orientated approach?'. That would have a different answer again, but, if you felt adventurous (and capable) you might even consider one of the non-beginner distros (Slackware, LFS, if that is a distro, Gentoo (and derivatives), Arch), on the grounds that getting your hands dirty would be constructive, long-term. The trouble with that approach is it might be rather too abrupt of a learning curve, depending on your degree of existing experience and capability.
 
Old 07-26-2011, 12:53 PM   #5
DavidMcCann
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Whether it's a server or a desktop, you want something stable and something with long-term support. I know a lot of organisations are using Ubuntu, but I don't think it qualifies on either criterion. My choice would be Red Hat for paid support, CentOS or Slackware/Salix for a free distro.

Last edited by DavidMcCann; 07-26-2011 at 12:55 PM.
 
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Old 07-26-2011, 09:01 PM   #6
chrism01
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While I'd generally agree RHEL or Centos (paid or free), in the interests of fairness, I have read that Ubuntu does have an LTS version, but I don't know the ins & outs of how that works.
 
Old 07-26-2011, 10:30 PM   #7
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
While I'd generally agree RHEL or Centos (paid or free), in the interests of fairness, I have read that Ubuntu does have an LTS version, but I don't know the ins & outs of how that works.

Had a not so nice experience w/ LTS. Trying to help a friend analyse
a problem they're having w/ 8.04 I went to the Ubuntu site, downloaded
what's labeled 8.04 LTS and installed it, only to find that what I got
was actually 10.4. Unimpressed :}


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-27-2011, 12:25 AM   #8
chrism01
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Hence my comment
 
Old 07-27-2011, 01:02 AM   #9
cascade9
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@ Tinkster- weird. When did this happen, and were you trying to d/l the server version or the dsktop version?

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
While I'd generally agree RHEL or Centos (paid or free), in the interests of fairness, I have read that Ubuntu does have an LTS version, but I don't know the ins & outs of how that works.
Normal ubuntu releases - 18 months support (from initial release date)
LTS ubuntu releases- changes to 3 years support for desktop, and 5 years, for the server version only. Technically, if you install a desktop on a LTS server version it stops being a server version and changes into a 'normal' desktop version.

IMO you would be better off with debian in a corporate enviroment. The 'upgrade' nag screens of ubuntu isnt great in a corporate enviroment (you really dont want users trying to upgrade ubuntu in a work enviroment). Debian would also be easier to setup as far as users/premissions go, none of this 'disabled root' and 'sudo by default' with debian.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 01:16 AM   #10
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
@ Tinkster- weird. When did this happen, and were you trying to d/l the server version or the dsktop version?
Code:
-rw-r--r--  1 tinkster tinkster  595445760 Jun 12 16:24 ubuntu-8.04.4-server-i386.iso


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-27-2011, 04:40 AM   #11
cascade9
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Hmm, I just tried having a look at the ubuntu site, and it looks like the 8.04 server versions arent up anymore.

Still, its very weird and seriously wrong IMO that you tried to d/l 8.04 and got 10.04.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 05:48 AM   #12
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
While I'd generally agree RHEL or Centos (paid or free), in the interests of fairness, I have read that Ubuntu does have an LTS version, but I don't know the ins & outs of how that works.
I wouldn't go for that. I have tried the desktop version of 10.04 LTS for my employee at that time, and since they have the same 6 month development time as for their normal versions it came out buggy. Nothing one would want in a corporate environment, if you want Debian based better use Debian.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 01:18 PM   #13
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
Hmm, I just tried having a look at the ubuntu site, and it looks like the 8.04 server versions arent up anymore.

Still, its very weird and seriously wrong IMO that you tried to d/l 8.04 and got 10.04.
Not sure what you mean:


ubuntu-8.04.4-server-i386.iso
can be found at
http://releases.ubuntu.com/8.04/
and after an install will identify itself as 10.4.


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-27-2011, 05:56 PM   #14
craigevil
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Corporate server= RedHat or Suse
desktop = Debian, Ubuntu LTS, Suse
 
Old 07-28-2011, 02:42 AM   #15
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster View Post
Not sure what you mean:


ubuntu-8.04.4-server-i386.iso
can be found at
http://releases.ubuntu.com/8.04/
and after an install will identify itself as 10.4.
I was far lazier than that, I just went to the ubuntu homepage, hit 'ubuntu server' then got this-

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/server/download

Which only gives you options for 10.04 and 11.04.

Sorry, I probably should have tried digging a bit more, I knew that page you linked to exists. Then again, I wouldnt have wanted to d/l 8.04 or 10.04 myself, and from what you've said I wouldnt have known I got 10.04 untill I tried to install....

I think its actually pretty interesting, 8.04 not on the main 'glossy' server d/l page, and 8.04 server changed to 10.04 without changing the .iso name. As for what it means, I'm hardly a fan of ubuntu so anything I dream up is likely to be biased. LOL
 
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