LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 07-19-2010, 09:05 PM   #1
WillingToLearn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
Best distro based on system to learn?


Hello everyone,

I dabbled in Linux a few years ago, but never really got past trying to compile a new kernel due to memory in the system.

I am dabbling again with the purpose of completely migrating my systems to Linux, and I am wondering what is the best disto for learning on the following system:

AMD Athlon64 3000+
2GB Memory
200gb hard drive
Nvidia FX 5200 AGP card

I did install Ubuntu (latest on it) but it felt _really_ sluggish, but that could have been due to drivers? Opening FireFox took literally forever and I just dumped it after that thinking there was something wrong with the system, but it checks out fine.

Thanks,

WinllingtoLearn
 
Old 07-19-2010, 09:09 PM   #2
Mr. Majestic
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Distribution: Ubuntu, slackware, fedora, gentoo
Posts: 53

Rep: Reputation: 17
Well, are you going for ease of use? If you don't mind a distro that has a little more involved install process I like Slackware. There is not single best distribution. It really depends on what you like and what you're going for. You said for learning purposes. What exactly are you wanting to learn?
 
Old 07-19-2010, 09:15 PM   #3
WillingToLearn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Majestic View Post
Well, are you going for ease of use? If you don't mind a distro that has a little more involved install process I like Slackware. There is not single best distribution. It really depends on what you like and what you're going for. You said for learning purposes. What exactly are you wanting to learn?
What I mean by learning is a good starting point to learn Linux and then more to something more advanced when I get the gist of things.

The system I am installing Linux on will be a dedicated system to learn on before moving everything over to my main systems. (1 8 Core system (Nahalem based), 4 Quad core systems, 2 Dual Core Systems)

Eventually, I would prefer to ditch Microsoft applications entirely.
 
Old 07-19-2010, 09:30 PM   #4
j1alu
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Distribution: debian gnu/linux
Posts: 798

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
What I mean by learning is a good starting point to learn Linux and then more to something more advanced when I get the gist of things.
Seriously: i don't think it matters which distro you choose. Make sure to do as much as possible from the command-line (one step after the other, of course). A good forum (where you find links and that) is good too.

I did learn a lot by installing Debian without desktop-environment and then X, a window-manager and the applications on my own.
Setting up an easy virtualization like VirtualBox might be a good idea too (so you might play and test without the worry to bork your system, do installations just for fun, etc). You might also learn a bit about ssh, sshfs and such stuff without the need to run two PCs at the same time.
 
Old 07-19-2010, 09:35 PM   #5
Mr. Majestic
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Distribution: Ubuntu, slackware, fedora, gentoo
Posts: 53

Rep: Reputation: 17
I would agree with what j1alu said. Understanding the command line is essential to fully understanding Linux. You may find it beneficial to install Linux without using a nice graphical installer (like what ubuntu provides for example). At least if your installing through the command line you will be exposed to some of the commands. Depending how many commands depends on the distro. On that takes a lot of different commands to install is Gentoo. I will warn you though, Gentoo is a very involved Linux distro that is geared more towards people that know what they are doing, so it may be best to start with a slightly easier distro. In the end it's entirely up to you though. No one can tell you what the best is as that is all a matter of personal preference. When I first got started in Linux I learned a lot by forcing myself to do stuff through the command line rather than through the GUI.
 
Old 07-19-2010, 11:20 PM   #6
frankbell
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Mageia, Mint
Posts: 7,627

Rep: Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442Reputation: 1442
If you want to learn, j1alu is correct about the command line. One can be a Linux user without learning the command line, but one cannot become proficient (not that I am) without it.

I think that Slackware is the way to go.

I started with Slackware quite by accident and I'm glad I did. What I learned from using Slack has made every other distro I've tried easier to use.

Slack is still my first choice.

The Slack forum here is excellent, and the newsgroup, alt.os.linux.slackware, is also full of helpful folks (and a couple of chronic trolls who are happy only when making trouble, but you will figure out who they are very quickly).
 
Old 07-19-2010, 11:26 PM   #7
Matt1522
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
If by latest you mean 10.4, I had a problem with it running slowly. I did have 9.04 installed and it ran great. If you think it may be a hardware issue you can try Xubuntu. Im sure it has been said but there are many distributions that may suit your needs.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 12:10 AM   #8
wingevil
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Distribution: slack32-13
Posts: 147

Rep: Reputation: 19
Have a look also, which documentation and helpfully communities are available for the distro you want to learn. I think this is essential for a success.

Of this point of view I would recommend you

slackware ("easiest")
arch ("advanced")
gentoo ("heavy metal")

 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:03 AM   #9
animeman
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Bad Axe mi
Distribution: gentoo, Android, bohidI
Posts: 85

Rep: Reputation: 17
gentoo was fun though i never got my x to work properly.......
 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:29 AM   #10
leopoldb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Location: Nacka, Sweden
Distribution: OpenSuSe 11.3, Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, XP
Posts: 29

Rep: Reputation: 15
Smile I suggest a book

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillingToLearn View Post
Hello everyone,

I dabbled in Linux a few years ago, but never really got past trying to compile a new kernel due to memory in the system.

I did install Ubuntu (latest on it) but it felt _really_ sluggish, but that could have been due to drivers? Opening FireFox took literally forever and I just dumped it after that thinking there was something wrong with the system, but it checks out fine.

Thanks,
WinllingtoLearn
Hello,
I would like to suggest a book. "Ubuntu for Non-Geeks" by Rickford Grant. The 3:th edition or the 4:th (the 4:th is coming out the last of July). I have tried it and it gives you the basic for learning Ubuntu and a bit about Linux in general. As a complement, use forums for Linux, like ours, LinuxQustions.org.

Good luck!

//Leopold
 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:47 AM   #11
francp
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
Maybe try Fedora??
 
Old 07-20-2010, 02:15 AM   #12
malekmustaq
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: /root
Distribution: Slackware & BSD
Posts: 1,208

Rep: Reputation: 230Reputation: 230Reputation: 230
Which ever distro you go you must download this book and use it as your mate as you get along with linux. It is a well written book by a professional.

Good luck.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 06:48 AM   #13
el_gallo_azul
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Location: Darwin, Australia
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04
Posts: 16

Rep: Reputation: 0
I've been using Fedora 11 for a couple of years and find it's simple and very reliable. I've recently moved to Fedora 13 and it's great. It's a good way to just use your computer, with the option to solve problems etc and learn that way.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 07:52 AM   #14
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 11,149
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406Reputation: 1406
Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillingToLearn View Post
Hello everyone,

I dabbled in Linux a few years ago, but never really got past trying to compile a new kernel due to memory in the system.

I am dabbling again with the purpose of completely migrating my systems to Linux, and I am wondering what is the best disto for learning on the following system:

AMD Athlon64 3000+
2GB Memory
200gb hard drive
Nvidia FX 5200 AGP card

I did install Ubuntu (latest on it) but it felt _really_ sluggish, but that could have been due to drivers? Opening FireFox took literally forever and I just dumped it after that thinking there was something wrong with the system, but it checks out fine.

Thanks,

WinllingtoLearn
So you've shown us your need! What's your deed(s)? Installation is one thing but find out why the system seems sluggish. Giving up is not learning.

We will aid you when you help yourself to a solution. Provide us with what you have attempted and then maybe someone will be able to assist with the troubleshooting or ways to accomplish such.

'How to Ask Questions the Smart Way' would be one link you should look at to help us to help you in the future.

Just a few more links to aid you in the endeavor;

Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking
Virtualiation- Top 10


The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

 
Old 07-20-2010, 02:00 PM   #15
WillingToLearn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks all for the input and the pdf's to read. They were very helpful.

I have decided to go with Fedora 13, as I used Red Hat previously; so it should be a nice refresher.

As we speak I am formatting my USB drive to install Fedora 13 and should be up and running with in the hour
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is it difficult to learn how to use source-based distributions? Mr. Alex Linux - Distributions 11 05-29-2010 03:37 AM
Sorce based distro (gentoo) Vs Binary based distro(fedora, debian,..) ashwin_cse Linux - Distributions 7 02-08-2010 01:46 PM
How to convert a rpm based distro into deb (apt-get) distro ? pleasehelpme Linux - Newbie 3 02-11-2008 12:20 AM
Distro: Less scripting. Looking for mainly Elf binary based distro Z505 Linux - General 1 04-02-2005 11:33 PM
RAM based system instead of disk based system ? wini_g Linux - Hardware 7 04-05-2004 06:12 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:46 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration