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Old 11-08-2006, 12:27 PM   #1
jbumgarjr
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Registered: Jul 2006
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Best Distro and Nvidia Match


Is there such a thing as a good disto and nvidia match? I want a distro that I can just install using my nvidia card. I don't want to spend hours fooling around with getting the disto and nvidia to work properly.

I already know that ubuntu and nvidia isn't a good match because when I installed the GE Force 5200 card ubuntu gave a fatal error. When I went back to my onboard graphics ubuntu worked fine.

And yes the onboard was diabled so there wouldn't be any conflict between the onboard and nvidia card.

I might also add this is a dual boot system.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
 
Old 11-08-2006, 12:37 PM   #2
farslayer
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Not sure what you mean by fatal error.. Quite a few people have nVidia cards working with Ubuntu or Debian. personally I think nVidia cards are a snap to setup on Debian based distros.. usually takes me about a minute and a half to install the driver and manually edit the config file.. (I'm not big on wizards)

At what point do you get the error ? and what is the exact error..
I would bet the problem could be fixed in a short amount of time.
 
Old 11-08-2006, 01:11 PM   #3
jbumgarjr
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I get the error when it is trying to run the video drivers at startup. It displays a few of the addresses for the video and then crashes with a fatal error message.
 
Old 11-08-2006, 01:18 PM   #4
b0uncer
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For installing graphics card drivers you'll need your kernel source code pretty surely. Did you try installing the driver using some nVidia-provided installer (.sh or .bin or something), or using apt/Synaptic/some other front-end for apt or what? I've used the nVidia command-line driver installer utilies (a .bin file which checks the kernel version, installs a driver or if none is found, downloads sources and compiles one -- at least used to) and they've worked 250% better than those pieces of crap ATI calls "installers"..maybe the installion didn't work out as expected, or you didn't edit your X's configuration file the right way or something. Please tell more details so this can be worked out.
 
Old 11-08-2006, 01:43 PM   #5
farslayer
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Post the output of the following command
cat /var/log/Xorg.0.log | grep EE

Then at least we can see the errors you are getting.


For Debian based distros the Module-Assistant takes all the grunt work out of setting up nVidia Drivers.
http://wiki.debian.org/NvidiaHowTo?
 
Old 11-08-2006, 08:48 PM   #6
bigrigdriver
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Hi, jbumgarjr

My understanding of the nvidia driver requirements is as follows:

If you make a graphics hardware change, you have to re-install the nvidia driver. My guess is that the installation process probes the hardware and writes the configs.

Your original post states you have changed hardware, but no word on whether or not you re-installed the driver. Going back to the on-board hardware should work because that's the hardware that was present when you first installed the nvidia driver.
 
Old 11-08-2006, 09:31 PM   #7
JimBass
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I can second the notion that installing the NVidia installers from the command line with full kernel sources and no X running is a snap. This would work on all distros equally well, as long as you have the full kernel sources.

I build my own kernels, and always have the current one in /usr/src/linux. That is the default location, and the NVidia driver looks for it there. With those sources in place, all I have to do is stop X completely (logout -> end current session in KDE), and then run the NVidia installer as root. It builds all the kernel modules, and even modifies your xorg.conf, keeping a backup of the old. Run startx from there, and you're back in X with NVidia drivers.

Everytime I build a new kernel I have to do this, but it literally is less than 90 seconds to complete.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 12-10-2012, 07:30 PM   #8
gaftfreak
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Thumbs down Poor responses!

None of you, in your infinite Linux knowledge have answered this man's question! I too am having trouble finding a distro that will work with my Nvidia card OUT OF THE BOX! While trying to google my problem, I found this thread and was so overcome with disgust that I made an account just to comment on this. He JUST TOLD you that he doesn't want to spend forever trying to figure out how to make the card work. I know that you all of you, it takes 4 seconds because you all know exactly what you're doing, but for us noobs, NON OF THIS IS EASY!
 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:49 AM   #9
273
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If you follow the instructions it is easy. There is nothing to "work out" or "mess with" you just follow the instructions for your distribution.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:57 AM   #10
rnturn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gaftfreak View Post
None of you, in your infinite Linux knowledge have answered this man's question! I too am having trouble finding a distro that will work with my Nvidia card OUT OF THE BOX! While trying to google my problem, I found this thread and was so overcome with disgust that I made an account just to comment on this. He JUST TOLD you that he doesn't want to spend forever trying to figure out how to make the card work. I know that you all of you, it takes 4 seconds because you all know exactly what you're doing, but for us noobs, NON OF THIS IS EASY!
Wow... no need to get angry.

I can understand the desire to have an easy solution. We can blame nVidia for the (normally minor) trouble one has to go through to use their drivers.If there were a Linux distribution that worked with nVidia cards "out of the box" there would have been a simple answer to the original poster's question. The simple fact is that there isn't a distribution that uses all of an nVidia graphics card's features without having to download and install nVidia's driver. The vendor doesn't very closely with Linux developers and insists on developing their own drivers. The "nouveau" driver that ships with Linux does a decent job -- especially given that it it works only because of the incredible job that the guys reverse engineering the nVidia cards have been able to pull off -- but may not work as well as one would like, particularly if the user is into gaming.

My experience with the nVidia driver process is something like (sorry, I didn't take detailed notes) this:

* Download the driver file from the nVidia web site. You'll likely have to search for your adapter to get the correct driver file. I have a fairly old adapter (6200) but it is still handled by the latest driver. (On the other hand, I have an old MX400 adapter in a system that has to use one of their "legacy" drivers. YMMV.) It'll have a file extension of ".run". Alternately, you might see a note on their site that directs you to use your distribution's package manager. If you're using a distribution that is no longer actively supported, you'll probably have to use the ".run" file method.

* Make sure "X" isn't running.

* Execute the ".run" file using "sh whateverfilename.run". This will ask you some questions that you can normally answer "Yes" to. During the installer's execution, it will build the driver. NOTE: during this phase, your installation must have the kernel development package installed as the driver compilation process will need the header files (and possibly the kernel sources, as well). If you're not sure, use your distribution's package manager to see if they're installed. In my case I could use
Code:
rpm -qa | grep -i kernel | sort | less
(the sort and less steps are optional) to verify that the kernel header package was installed. If they're not you need to grab your CDs/DVDs and installed them using your package manager/software manager.

* The installed will normally tweak your Xorg configuration file so that the new nVidia driver will be used.

And that is, normally, about it.

I will admit that there can be some oddball errors that can crop up. For example, I'm still working on getting the legacy driver working on that system containing the MX400 adapter. (Heck, the thing is at least 10 years old so I'm not all that surprised that I'm experiencing this little adventure.)

Also, I poked around on the nVidia web site and found that the "173.14.36" driver seems like it might be the best driver for the card that the original poster mentioned. BUT... "5200" is a little too generic of a description. Most of the cards that I saw were listed as "FX5xxx", "5xxxLE", or something similar. It would be best to have an accurate description before downloading the wrong driver and getting a headache trying to make it work with an adapter that it doesn't support.

Hope this helped a bit...

--
Rick
 
Old 12-11-2012, 12:01 PM   #11
DavidMcCann
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That card appears to be a pain with Linux. Try Linux Mint. If the open-source driver gives poor results, here's a tutorial on installing the proprietary one (a messy job, but the instructions are very clear: print them out and follow carefully)

http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopi...a+5200#p650947

PS. Here's a similar post, which may give you some ideas
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ox-4175440894/

Last edited by DavidMcCann; 12-11-2012 at 12:03 PM.
 
  


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