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Old 01-19-2006, 04:09 PM   #16
sundialsvcs
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Putting Politics aside ... ...

If you ask ten users of ten distros which is the best distro for "a newbie," they'd probably answer with their personal favorite, leaving you just as as before.

Here's what I'd suggest:
  1. Pick any readily-available and well-known distro. (Look at DistroWatch.)
  2. Install it on a second hard-drive in your machine. (Leave the existing primary drive, containing Windows or whatever you're using now, completely alone throughout!)
  3. Noodle around with Linux. Start with the initial "gee that's new and different !" reaction, then start to explore.
  4. Arrange things so that you always have "an out." By switching the boot-drive designation back to the Windows drive, you can get back to (ick... ) where you started, which means that you can do all sorts of unkind things to your Linux drive, in the name of self-education, and always get back.
Realistically, there is no way to avoid the feeling that "your mind is exploding," or to quote Gary Larson's Far Side: "May I leave the room? My brain is full..." That's learning, and sometimes learning hits you in the face with a cast-iron skillet... "pwan-n-n-n-ng!" But if you just keep-at-it enough, things will begin to make sense. You will find that, even though you've been tossed into an unfamiliar new environment, gee, a lot of the things that you knew from "other systems" still do apply here.

Maybe the best way to really Learn Linux is not to be afraid, either of the learning experience or of screwing-up. So, if you try to plan for eventualities, you might periodically find yourself spluttering and gasping ... but while wearing the life-vest that you thoughtfully put on ahead of time, and while holding the bright orange line that leads back to the boat that you thoughtfully anchored, with the ladder that you thoughtfully rigged so that it would be easy to get back aboard. And... you have found this web-site, full of "swimming lessons" and sympathetic fellow swimmers.
 
Old 01-19-2006, 05:58 PM   #17
jaychamp
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Registered: Jan 2006
Location: FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs
Putting Politics aside ... ...

If you ask ten users of ten distros which is the best distro for "a newbie," they'd probably answer with their personal favorite, leaving you just as as before.

Here's what I'd suggest:
  1. Pick any readily-available and well-known distro. (Look at DistroWatch
  2. Install it on a second hard-drive in your machine. (Leave the existing primary drive, containing Windows or whatever you're using now, completely alone throughout!)
  3. Noodle around with Linux. Start with the initial "gee that's new and different !" reaction, then start to explore.
  4. Arrange things so that you always have "an out." By switching the boot-drive designation back to the Windows drive, you can get back to (ick... ) where you started, which means that you can do all sorts of unkind things to your Linux drive, in the name of self-education, and always get back.
Realistically, there is no way to avoid the feeling that "your mind is exploding," or to quote Gary Larson's Far Side: "May I leave the room? My brain is full..." That's learning, and sometimes learning hits you in the face with a cast-iron skillet... "pwan-n-n-n-ng!" But if you just keep-at-it enough, things will begin to make sense. You will find that, even though you've been tossed into an unfamiliar new environment, gee, a lot of the things that you knew from "other systems" still do apply here.

Maybe the best way to really Learn Linux is not to be afraid, either of the learning experience or of screwing-up. So, if you try to plan for eventualities, you might periodically find yourself spluttering and gasping ... but while wearing the life-vest that you thoughtfully put on ahead of time, and while holding the bright orange line that leads back to the boat that you thoughtfully anchored, with the ladder that you thoughtfully rigged so that it would be easy to get back aboard. And... you have found this web-site, full of "swimming lessons" and sympathetic fellow swimmers.
Excellent post.

I was thinking about this more last night. Before I posted here I had already installed FC4, which I just picked randomly. It's on my second PC which doesn't quite have the specs of the one I posted here but it seems to be running smoothly. So I'm probably just going to stick with that for now and see how she goes.

I've already learned alot over the past few days through trial and error. I'm patient but persistent, and fully expect having to reinstall it over and over again due to screwing things up royally. That's another reason I'm sticking with FC4, the installation was a breeze, which was done on a separate partition next to XP Pro.

I appreciate all the input and hope it helps other newbs like myself
 
Old 01-19-2006, 06:02 PM   #18
pljvaldez
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A great thing for Newbies to do is to take one of the quizes below and see which distro might suit them. It's as good a place as any to start!
 
Old 01-19-2006, 06:21 PM   #19
jaychamp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pljvaldez
A great thing for Newbies to do is to take one of the quizes below and see which distro might suit them. It's as good a place as any to start!
What can I say? You guys are good. I took the quiz and the top 3 for me are the top 3 mentioned here.
 
Old 01-19-2006, 06:22 PM   #20
pljvaldez
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The second quiz has a few more questions and distros that it'll recommend.
 
Old 01-19-2006, 06:52 PM   #21
Tylerious
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For a newbie who wants to learn linux, I absolutely recommend Slackware. It does things the standard way, so when you learn, you learn *nix, not a particular distribution's own personal way. Sure, it may not be as streamlined, but there's no better way to learn linux than to get your hands dirty. Then maybe when you know what's going on, you might want to try something a little more streamlined.
 
Old 01-19-2006, 07:22 PM   #22
brianL
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Mandriva's easy to install. I'm a sort of half-hearted anarchist/socialist, but I haven't discussed politics with either of my operating systems, so I'm not sure about them.
 
Old 03-13-2006, 10:11 AM   #23
MichaelZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezzanine
Ubuntu stinks, stay away from it. It's communist Linux. It's got a friendly face face but it is evil deep down inside.
Sorry, but you are completly wrong here . I am using ubuntu 5.10 on my old PIII 500MHz and it works fine. Ubuntu is not that difficult to use (I am a Linux newbie anyway) and I never had problems. If I need help, I search in the ubuntu forum and eventually post there.

IMHO, you did not try it enough .

Best wishes,
Michael
 
Old 03-13-2006, 10:15 AM   #24
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelZ
Sorry, but you are completly wrong here . I am using ubuntu 5.10 on my old PIII 500MHz and it works fine. Ubuntu is not that difficult to use (I am a Linux newbie anyway) and I never had problems. If I need help, I search in the ubuntu forum and eventually post there.

IMHO, you did not try it enough .

Best wishes,
Michael
"Mezzanine" got some major flack over his/her irresponsible statement. Has not been heard from since......
 
Old 03-13-2006, 10:21 AM   #25
pixellany
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Just did a bit of social studies research: "Mezzanine" has a posting history of ~20+ posts, ALL of which were posted Jan 19 or 20---then nothing.
Many of the posts seem to have the tone of: "I may be labelled a newbie here, but I already know everything--I just stopped in to tell you all how it is." Hit and run--not interested in community
 
Old 03-13-2006, 10:22 AM   #26
MichaelZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
"Mezzanine" got some major flack over his/her irresponsible statement. Has not been heard from since......
Yes, you are right. I posted a bit too fast. I just was relatively shocked by what he has said...

Best wishes,
Michael
 
Old 03-13-2006, 12:14 PM   #27
smiley_lauf
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What a newbie needs is support. and many distro have excellent forums. Problems is time..to search for the right answer. Ubuntu gives this all in one place, in their superb wiki documentation project. In my newbie experience, the installation is not that hard i Ubuntu, and the post-installation customization is also effortless if you stick to the wiki e.g. get the multimedia working in under 5 minutes! After that all is in cruze control. I must say, dapper has chnaged the way I look at Ubuntu. it is simple the most user friendly version I have come across for the newbiw: hardware detection, iclusing SD phtocard on my laptop, were detected without a glitch. I even got the ATI firegl V5000 display working for 3D within a couple of code lines cut-and-pated from wiki documentation. apt-get/synaptic is an advantage.

I am obviosly biased towards Ubuntu, may be because it works for me. Iwould suggest to the newbow to try various ones (will nee to commit time for this) and then settle for the one that meets your requirmenments.
 
Old 03-13-2006, 01:09 PM   #28
thandermax
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Cool Suse 10

I would recomend using SUSE 10 . Download it free from www.opensuse.org

Lots of stuff includded
 
Old 03-13-2006, 02:31 PM   #29
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smiley_lauf

I am obviosly biased towards Ubuntu, may be because it works for me. Iwould suggest to the newbow to try various ones (will nee to commit time for this) and then settle for the one that meets your requirmenments.
Veering further off-topic......

I like the Ubuntu/Canonical/Shuttleworth philosophy and body language: Unambiguosly free SW--pay for support if you need to.
I especially like the free SW kiosks they were going to set up.

I have now stayed with Ubuntu longer thatn any other distro. It is the workhorse at home, and will soon go on office machine**.

I would ask how you got 6.04 early, but you'll just tell me to go to the site---which I will now do...


**Office is now RHEL4, which is what our IT people support. (At least they support Linux!!) As I approach the point where I know almost as much as their only Linux person, then RHEL is toast....
 
  


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