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Old 07-06-2008, 01:36 PM   #31
souneedalink
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klopper View Post
- Why are there so many "Distributions" of Linux?
- Why is there a need for using commands and where are they entered?
- Will I encounter issues when installing any video drivers, motherboard drivers etc?
1 - Because there can be, different approaches, different ideas, competition, freedom.

2 - Because commands "just work", because 'commands' are the real power of a operating system, because nobody can complain that the interface isn't pretty enough. They are entered in what is called a terminal or shell or console application. It is the most amazing application ever created. It is a interface for a thousand tools and uses less resources than even one GUI tool.

3 - Who knows? Depends on many things. Many drivers are included.
 
Old 07-06-2008, 02:54 PM   #32
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If I've got an e2160 which is the correct one to download? (ubuntu)
 
Old 07-06-2008, 03:25 PM   #33
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Quote:
I loaded it up and it was to install ubuntu. I'm rather confused how I use the livecd feature?
You loaded what up?

Please be specific.

I have a live-cd of Ubuntu 8.04 - and it gives me 5 options to choose from:

1.) try Ubuntu without any change to your computer - that is the live-cd function
2.) Install Ubuntu
3.) check cd for defects
4.) Test memory
5.) Boot from first harddisk - this would be the option to choose if you wanted to boot an existing installation with the help of the cd

Do you by any chance mean that you "loaded up" wubi?

Last edited by jomen; 07-06-2008 at 04:20 PM. Reason: actual quote added because there are posts in between
 
Old 07-06-2008, 03:31 PM   #34
jomen
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If your computer is a 64 bit system then download the 64 bit version of Ubuntu.
The 32 bit version will work too and is possibly less problematic in some areas (64 bit can be a little tricky with some programs - so I hear, I don't own such a machine)
 
Old 07-06-2008, 03:44 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klopper View Post
If I've got an e2160 which is the correct one to download? (ubuntu)
The e2160 supports x86_64 so either a 32bit x86 or an x86_64 kernel will work.

The better choice might depend on how much ram you have. But probably there would be no significant difference (either choice will give equally good results).

A few operations (such as, I think, video and audio transcoding will run a lot better in 64 bit regardless of the amount of ram). Various other activities (database server, etc.) may run significantly better in 64 bit than 32 bit on machines with a lot of ram (over 3GB) but 32 bit may be a bit better than 64 for those applications with under 3 GB.

For ordinary end user activities (web browsing, word processing, etc.) I don't think any of us really know whether 32 bit is better or worse than 64 bit, but either way the difference is probably trivial. If you have 3GB or less of physical ram, that may give 32 bit another tiny advantage over 64 bit, beyond whatever the differences are for a system with over 3GB, but even that difference won't give a big advantage to 32 bit.
 
Old 07-06-2008, 04:06 PM   #36
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If you are just starting with linux, I'd recommend a 32-bit version. As it was said before, there are only very small complications with 64 bit, but still...
 
Old 07-06-2008, 05:35 PM   #37
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Using livecd i just got the error

"boot error"
 
Old 07-06-2008, 05:41 PM   #38
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When? Can you be more specific?
 
Old 07-06-2008, 05:53 PM   #39
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I loaded up the cd, then when choosing the option "try Ubuntu without any change to your computer - that is the live-cd function" it lagged for 10 seconds then gave me that error.
 
Old 07-06-2008, 06:00 PM   #40
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Does it say anything else or just 'boot error'?
Also, have you checked the MD5 sum (if the image downloaded correctly)?
Here are the instructions for doing it
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToMD5SUM
 
Old 07-06-2008, 06:11 PM   #41
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Not that your copy is working yet, but I thought that you might want to know
the Linux drive naming conventions.

First of 'C:' is something that only appears in DOS/Windows and the BIOS.
On Linux (and related systems) the top directory is simply '/' so that you
can pretend that folders on a separate drive are actually sub directories
(IE: '/' is on the primary master and '/home' is on the secondary master).

To make up for this oddity there is a directory called '/dev' which contains
files that represent the computers devices and miscellaneous other stuff.

In the past the first partition on the primary master is /dev/hda1 and most
people will probably still call it that. However now that serial hard disk
are every where it is referred to as /dev/sda1.
That is: devices --- Serial Disk --- A (first one) --- section one
Don't worry if it sounds a little confusing, you're right. But it makes
running massive systems and programming drivers easier.



Also you'll want a swap partition so that Linux has somewhere to place virtual
RAM just in case you run out of the real stuff (that might be needed on a
new box but better safe than sorry).
Windows does the whole virtual RAM thing as well, but it dumps that anywhere and
fragments the computer.
If you want defrag tools for Linux forget it. They are out there but they are rare
and hard to use since there has not been the need for them to be something most
people use (and those who use them don't do so often).


Also your CDROM drive will be most likely labeled /dev/cdrom or /dev/scd0 on Ubuntu.
(It could use both by making a file called /dev/cdrom that tells the computer
to go to /dev/scd0).








As to distributions. Mircosoft do this to by having the XP /Vista OS's for PC
and a largely separate line for servers. This is just a bit more extreme.
You have Slackware for old programmers, Red Hat Enterprise Linux for admins,
Ubuntu for newbies / office workers and so on. There are also a vast number that
are made for one task (if you read APC Mag you've probably 'System rescue CD').


PS: Arrogant? A little short on knowledge but you were a bit hard on yourself there.
 
Old 07-06-2008, 11:38 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klopper View Post
Thanks for these wonderful replies. After reading the replies above and this page http://apcmag.com/howto_category.htm?cid=197
I have decided that Ubuntu with Gnome seems like the easiest option.

- Gnome and KDE are both desktops?
- Does Ubuntu come with Gnome in the default package?
1) Yes, GNOME and KDE are both desktops. Different desktops for different people. Some people mix and match parts too.

2) Yes, Ubuntu uses GNOME by default. Very easy to install Ubuntu(most of the time).
 
Old 07-07-2008, 01:07 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klopper View Post
Using livecd i just got the error

"boot error"

That could be, one of several things...
Firstly, the dvd is at fault, checking the md5 sumcheck will help there...
Secondly that your pc is not able to run this distro of linux, that may have to do with what version you downloaded and the kernel...
thirdly, you may have to try again...(ps is the dvd live bootable?)

could you put details of your pc up here, ie
Motherboard
graphics

these two are the criticals we need to work it out...
Also is it a laptop and if so, the model will answer a lot of questions...

I have installed linux on many pc's and usually buy according to known chipsets that work with linux, without problems...But systems that have problems can be worked around, no matter what...
It just comes down to persistence...

Last edited by wraithe; 07-07-2008 at 01:08 AM.
 
Old 07-07-2008, 05:23 AM   #44
jomen
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klopper wrote
Quote:
Using livecd i just got the error

"boot error"
Quote:
I loaded up the cd, then when choosing the option "try Ubuntu without any change to your computer - that is the live-cd function" it lagged for 10 seconds then gave me that error.
Until the OP puts in the effort to provide far more detailed description and recognizable error-messages which fit the scenario he is describing there is not much point in continuing this.
I'm sorry, but to me this looks like cut&paste without ever having actually seen or tried...I wrote this, but it is not what the menu in Ubuntu says...
I hope I'm wrong - I also hope to have made clear what I suspect this tread to be...
 
Old 07-07-2008, 06:56 AM   #45
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It's trolling.
 
  


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