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Old 08-07-2010, 12:46 PM   #1
Dominic1990
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Question Basic


what are the basic difference between linux and windows?
-functional differences
-why linux can work even in low hardware configuration than windows?
-is there any difference between linux and windows in handling the pc/hardware devices?
 
Old 08-07-2010, 12:49 PM   #2
sycamorex
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Hi Dominic and welcome to LQ.

Lesson One: We don't do homeworks.

Lesson Two: Google it.

Lesson Three: Use meaningful titles
 
Old 08-07-2010, 01:00 PM   #3
Dinithion
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Well, you can't run windows binaries on GNU/Linux system, and many new users try to install .exe-files, without luck. For me personally, I found the directory structure unusual. I didn't quite understand how to access floppys and CDs without any a:, d: etc. (I came to learn that the *nix way to do this is far superior )

GNU/Linux can run on so many different systems, because the user have full control over his/her environment. There is no people in a central place, say Redmond, that in cooperation with hardware vendors decides how great computer you should have to run the new operating system. If you GNU/Linux system is slow when running KDE, you can run something less resource heavy, i.e. fluxbox or lxde for a little more functionality.

Well, in GNU/Linux you can compile your kernel to include support for mostly all hardware that's available. Windows have only basic build-in support, and you expand with drivers. You can obviously do this with Linux aswell, like Nvidia does for it's binary support for 3d acceleration. More detailed differences regarding Linux and Windows I will leave for someone else

Edit: Did I just do someone else's homework? D'oh..

Last edited by Dinithion; 08-07-2010 at 01:01 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-07-2010, 01:36 PM   #4
Sumguy
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There is no bloatware in Linux- it's all business! (i.e. no space wasted installing little things which try to get you to subscribe to Norton anti-virus or AOL dial-up....)

I'm no eggspurt, so I'll say this from a purely layman's vantage-point: Linux is more efficient. You do not need to defragment Linux because it operates in an orderly, efficient way.

Linux does not have a registry, -so there is nothing there to be easily hijacked or which needs to be constantly cleaned up because various programs and settings made changes to it.

I assume that Linux handles hardware differently, since it operates on different principles and a different structure than Win-D'ohs....but I don't know about those things- I'll just say that from a user's perspective, all my hardware was detected perfectly when I started using Linux a few weeks ago and required zero configuration on my part. Being used to Win-D'ohs, I was dreading the first time I had to use my printer or plug in my mp3 player or video camera....but my worries were in vain, as everything "just worked" immediately and with zero fiddling on my part. My printer printed better than it ever had before.

I installed Linux Ubuntu a few weeks ago with the idea of just trying it out over time to see if it could be a replacement for Win-D'ohs.....well, within an hour I saw that I no longer had any reason to return to Win-D'ohs!

You can read a ton of stuff about Linux...but the proof is in the user experience. Just try it, and you'll see it's superiority in many ways which may sound trivial on paper...but which make for a greatly improved computing experience.

I'm just sorry that I wasted the last 11 years using Win-D'ohs!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-07-2010, 02:04 PM   #5
Mr. Alex
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Linux is Not Windows
http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
 
Old 08-07-2010, 02:12 PM   #6
Bratmon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
There is no bloatware in Linux- it's all business! (i.e. no space wasted installing little things which try to get you to subscribe to Norton anti-virus or AOL dial-up....)
HP printer drivers.
 
Old 08-08-2010, 06:56 AM   #7
Dominic1990
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Registered: Aug 2010
Posts: 2

Original Poster
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinithion View Post
Well, you can't run windows binaries on GNU/Linux system, and many new users try to install .exe-files, without luck. For me personally, I found the directory structure unusual. I didn't quite understand how to access floppys and CDs without any a:, d: etc. (I came to learn that the *nix way to do this is far superior )

GNU/Linux can run on so many different systems, because the user have full control over his/her environment. There is no people in a central place, say Redmond, that in cooperation with hardware vendors decides how great computer you should have to run the new operating system. If you GNU/Linux system is slow when running KDE, you can run something less resource heavy, i.e. fluxbox or lxde for a little more functionality.

Well, in GNU/Linux you can compile your kernel to include support for mostly all hardware that's available. Windows have only basic build-in support, and you expand with drivers. You can obviously do this with Linux aswell, like Nvidia does for it's binary support for 3d acceleration. More detailed differences regarding Linux and Windows I will leave for someone else

Edit: Did I just do someone else's homework? D'oh..
-THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
Your informations are useful
 
  


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