LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-03-2011, 04:05 AM   #16
bsat
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2009
Posts: 347

Rep: Reputation: 72

I second what inkit has said, if you find your distro not comfortable you are free to try some thing else. You can download ubuntu 10.04 LTS from http://www.ubuntu.com/download it is stable and very user friendly.

The only time it will ask you for password is when you want to install some thing or do tasks that require admin like privileges.
 
Click here to see the post LQ members have rated as the most helpful post in this thread.
Old 07-03-2011, 09:19 AM   #17
billybob12
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Dover,FL
Distribution: LInux mint 14 Nadia
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Well thanks for the comments and suggestions.
Inkjet. I tried Ubuntu 10.10 and it would freeze so much and that is why I am trying Pclinus.

Eddy the one.These overkill security features are not needed by everyone. One size does not fit all. I am living alone except for my cat and he does not access my computers.

Tobasco. su? Well that was posted right here in this thread. "Simply enter su and when asked for a password enter it."It is not accepted as a valid code. I don't remember the exact error but the bottom line is it does nothing toward solving this problem.Learning this system is not unlike trying to nail Jell-O to the wall or a monkey trying to compulate with a football.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 09:31 AM   #18
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836
Again, there is no such thing like Pclinus. I think that you are referring to me with Tobasco, even if that is not my nick.
Some questions: Where did you enter su? Which password did you type in? Again, which error message did you get (shouldn't be so hard to type a two letter word and post the error-message here)?
We can only help you when you help us to help you. And did you really think that you come to a new operating system and know everything about it instantly without learning?

Some suggestions:
- Misspelling the names of members here that are trying to help you can be considered to be rude. Why should we help you if you don't even take the time to read and write our names properly?

Quote:
These overkill security features are not needed by everyone. One size does not fit all. I am living alone except for my cat and he does not access my computers.
This exactly is the reason why there is such a huge amount of malware for less secure systems like Windows XP, people don't want to see that they are not alone when their machine is connected to the net. You don't want that security? You want your personal data to be accessible to every one? Your decision, just log in as root and you will not get bothered with typing in your password anymore. But don't complain if "miraculously" all your bank accounts are without money and someone buys stuff for you at ebay. Also don't complain if someone uses your computer to send spam mail, break into other computers or host child-porn. You didn't want the security.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 07-03-2011 at 09:32 AM.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:22 PM   #19
billybob12
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Dover,FL
Distribution: LInux mint 14 Nadia
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Again, there is no such thing like Pclinus. I think that you are referring to me with Tobasco, even if that is not my nick.
Some questions: Where did you enter su? Which password did you type in? Again, which error message did you get (shouldn't be so hard to type a two letter word and post the error-message here)?
We can only help you when you help us to help you. And did you really think that you come to a new operating system and know everything about it instantly without learning?

Some suggestions:
- Misspelling the names of members here that are trying to help you can be considered to be rude. Why should we help you if you don't even take the time to read and write our names properly?


This exactly is the reason why there is such a huge amount of malware for less secure systems like Windows XP, people don't want to see that they are not alone when their machine is connected to the net. You don't want that security? You want your personal data to be accessible to every one? Your decision, just log in as root and you will not get bothered with typing in your password anymore. But don't complain if "miraculously" all your bank accounts are without money and someone buys stuff for you at ebay. Also don't complain if someone uses your computer to send spam mail, break into other computers or host child-porn. You didn't want the security.
[bill@localhost ~]$ su
Password:
[root@localhost ~]#
OK. When I type su>enter pw this comes up. What am I supposed to do with it if anything. After doing this I am still asked for a password.

Edit: You are dancing around my last question. What am I supposed to do with this?

[bill@localhost ~]$ su
Password:
[root@localhost ~]#

Last edited by billybob12; 07-03-2011 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Because I can
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:40 PM   #20
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836
You noticed that the prompt changed from your username to root? That means you can do any administrative task you want from this commandline after using su, without typing in your password.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:40 PM   #21
Inkit
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: India
Distribution: Mint 10
Posts: 142

Rep: Reputation: 15
Why don't you try some other distribution then. You may find one that you like. The best part of using Linux is that you have choice, and as far as I know human beings like to try different things before they pick on one.
Quote:
[bill@localhost ~]$ su
Password:
[root@localhost ~]#
OK. When I type su>enter pw this comes up. What am I supposed to do with it if anything. After doing this I am still asked for a password.
You've logged into the root shell, but I get what you're saying. If you really want to do it, (don't complain if your system gets screwed because you ran it in admin mode) just log out of your system. As far as I know most distributions will give you the option of logging into your user ID and an "Other". Click on other and under user give root. The password will be the same as what you entered above. Once you log in you won't be bothered about any password prompts at all, but once again you'll just be leaving your system wide open to anyone who wants to do anything with it. It's just an invitation to trouble.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:43 PM   #22
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
"su" only gives unlimited root permissions in terminal.
If you're doing administrative tasks in terminal you won't have to enter password anymore there.
Quote:
Well thanks for the comments and suggestions.
Inkjet. I tried Ubuntu 10.10 and it would freeze so much and that is why I am trying Pclinus.
How much ram do you have?
Try Debian, it uses less resources than ubuntu.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:52 PM   #23
T3RM1NVT0R
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2010
Location: Internet
Distribution: Linux Mint, SLES, CentOS, Red Hat
Posts: 2,385

Rep: Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477
@ Reply

Hi Tobi,

Long time no see ;-)

I have seen people using PClinux and I can see it here as well: http://iso.linuxquestions.org/pclinuxos/

OP spelled it as Pclinus (incorrectly spelled). I think it does exist. Can you please throw some light on this as even I am not sure if does but I have seen (never tried)

Hi Billybob12,

I would suggest you to use Linux Mint 10 (Julia). Trust me it is pretty light weight and easy to start when you are learning. It will help you in easy transition from Windows to Linux.

Last edited by T3RM1NVT0R; 07-03-2011 at 12:53 PM.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:52 PM   #24
billybob12
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Dover,FL
Distribution: LInux mint 14 Nadia
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
You noticed that the prompt changed from your username to root? That means you can do any administrative task you want from this commandline after using su, without typing in your password.
Sorry that statement won't hold water.I just tested it by entering su again in the terminal and was immediately asked for a password.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 12:55 PM   #25
repo
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 8,528

Rep: Reputation: 899Reputation: 899Reputation: 899Reputation: 899Reputation: 899Reputation: 899Reputation: 899
Quote:
Sorry that statement won't hold water.I just tested it by entering su again in the terminal and was immediately asked for a password.
Did you opened a new terminal for this?
You only have root access in he terminal where you used su.
What tasks are you doing, that you need to be root all the time?

Kind regards
 
Old 07-03-2011, 01:02 PM   #26
T3RM1NVT0R
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2010
Location: Internet
Distribution: Linux Mint, SLES, CentOS, Red Hat
Posts: 2,385

Rep: Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477Reputation: 477
@ Reply

Hello Billybob12,

As I can understand you are pretty used to Windows. Tell me this when you log in using a Standard Account in Windows and try to open Computer Management does it not ask you for the password. I think it does. Why? Security, so that no Standard user can just login to your system and format your partitions. Right?

Same here in Linux. When you log in using Standard account (Logging in as root in GUI mode is strongly discouraged and it is pretty dangerous to. Simple reason: If you are logging in as root and some malicious software got entry into your system then it can install itself and send information outside without you being notified. If you will login as standard user the same has to first authenticate before installing itself thus notifying you of something is wrong). As you said that even after su and changing the prompt to # if you do su again it ask you for password. It should not ask for password. Can you share screenshot of that with us. Appears to be a bug in the code if it is asking. I have tried this on my Ubuntu and RHEL system and it does not prompt me for root password once I am in # prompt.

As I suggested in my previous post get Linux Mint installed. It will help in easy transition.

Edit: Repo is right. If you are opening a new terminal then it will ask. If it ask in the same terminal then there is something wrong.

Last edited by T3RM1NVT0R; 07-03-2011 at 01:04 PM.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 01:03 PM   #27
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836
Quote:
Originally Posted by T3RM1NVT0R View Post
I have seen people using PClinux and I can see it here as well: http://iso.linuxquestions.org/pclinuxos/
Yes, PCLinuxOS exists, AFAIK it is derived from Mandriva and the only distribution I know of that uses the APT package management with RPM packages.


Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob12
Sorry that statement won't hold water.I just tested it by entering su again in the terminal and was immediately asked for a password.
Did you actually read that statement? I said that you will be able to do administrative tasks on that commandline after entering su without the need of giving the password again. Why do you type su in again? Try any administrative task after changing to root (that is what the su-command actually does) and you will see that you don't need a password for that.
 
Old 07-03-2011, 01:45 PM   #28
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,979

Rep: Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850
Hello billybob12,

why don't you read the manpages
Code:
man su
(executed in a terminal)

As for Windows, it is true that one can configure the "Home-Edition" in a way that the user is not asked for a password but automatically logged in.

But once you use Windows at work, you will have to enter a password when you want to login.

As for the su command, with Windows it is called "runas" and works the same way.

Markus
 
Old 07-03-2011, 05:31 PM   #29
billybob12
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Dover,FL
Distribution: LInux mint 14 Nadia
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thumbs down

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Yes, PCLinuxOS exists, AFAIK it is derived from Mandriva and the only distribution I know of that uses the APT package management with RPM packages.


Did you actually read that statement? I said that you will be able to do administrative tasks on that commandline after entering su without the need of giving the password again. Why do you type su in again? Try any administrative task after changing to root (that is what the su-command actually does) and you will see that you don't need a password for that.
Try any administrative task after changing to root (that is what the su-command actually does) and you will see that you don't need a password for that.

That is what I just told you people. I still have to enter a password in the terminal and admin tasks. I'm outa here. I found a good forum for PLOS-the linus that T3RMINVTOR said did not exist.
 
0 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-03-2011, 05:47 PM   #30
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836Reputation: 4836
I know you won't read that, because you are "outta here".
1. Any member here that has used su for his/her administrative tasks on the commandline knows that it works, because most of us have done it hundreds or even thousands of times.
2. There is no OS that is named linus and no distribution that is named PClinus. We came to the conclusion that you meant PCLinuxOS. I even have asked you about that name of your OS, but you have preferred to not answer that question.
3. With a behavior like that I am not in the mood to give you any help in the future, welcome to my ignore list. I hope that you can get better help on that other forum, but if you behave the same way as you have here I just doubt that.

Bye, have a nice life and fun with Linux.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cannot authenticate via AD avantman42 Linux - Server 0 07-16-2007 10:31 AM
Vsftpd help - Can't authenticate s0n|k Linux - Networking 3 02-23-2007 09:06 AM
Courier : how to authenticate vikasumit Linux - Software 1 06-09-2006 07:35 AM
authenticate against AD paul_mat Linux - Networking 5 05-28-2005 08:34 AM
Authenticate from a LDAP SuperSerg Linux - Security 2 12-20-2004 11:16 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:36 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration