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Old 11-24-2015, 06:22 PM   #1
Parko
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Attempting to jettison Windows 10.


I have attempted on numerous occasions to abandon Windows (currently Windows10) but regrettably have never found a suitable replacement. I have tried a number of the Linux OS but none that could compare to Windows. My current interest is in Qubes but I am not particularly clever at downloading it. I become confused by the different language. What I would welcome is advice from others who have successfully moved from Windows. Surely I am not the only one who has experienced this problem?
 
Old 11-24-2015, 06:25 PM   #2
Timothy Miller
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Gave up Windows as a primary OS 9 or 10 years ago. Still keep a couple installations for games, but that's it.

Step 1: Don't think of Linux as "a free version of windows". Linux is linux. Learn how to use linux, don't try to shoehorn linux into "I want it to do work like windows."

Step 2: Find yourself getting irritated because Windows won't act like linux.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 06:35 PM   #3
Habitual
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I quit "attempting" back in 2008.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 06:47 PM   #4
Parko
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An amazing quick response from Ohio and Arizona; many thanks guys. I reside in Scotland but I am not a kilt swinging Scot, just a frustrated PC user on which I spend too much time. I love the WWW as it is the greatest library the world has known (and, of course, a powerful political tool)! To pose a question and to get replies from about 6000 miles away in just a few short minutes has to be appreciated!
 
Old 11-24-2015, 06:53 PM   #5
Sefyir
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Best advice is to start with a clean slate. Mess around with a installed distro without trying to get windows programs to work.

Quote:
I have tried a number of the Linux OS but none that could compare to Windows.
Linux is not windows. Treat it as a standalone and figure out or learn the linux method of doing "stuff".
You're going to be frustrated at linux cause it really doesn't compare to windows. But I really wouldn't want it to.

Remember: Don't assume that being a knowledgeable Windows user means you're a knowledgeable Linux user: When you first start with Linux, you are a novice.
And that's completely ok.

Haven't used windows in +4 years and haven't missed it a bit.

Last edited by Sefyir; 11-24-2015 at 06:55 PM.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 07:44 PM   #6
berndbausch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parko View Post
I have attempted on numerous occasions to abandon Windows (currently Windows10) but regrettably have never found a suitable replacement. I have tried a number of the Linux OS but none that could compare to Windows. My current interest is in Qubes but I am not particularly clever at downloading it. I become confused by the different language. What I would welcome is advice from others who have successfully moved from Windows. Surely I am not the only one who has experienced this problem?
Why Qubes - because it allows you to run Windows and Linux side by side? I would just switch over.

Qubes is perhaps a step too quick. I don't know it but see that it uses virtualization to compartementalize applications, similarly to CoreOS it would seem (which uses containers). Thus not only do you jump from Windows to Linux, but immediately into a world that many Linux veterans would need to get used to as well.

While the Qubes concept looks very interesting, I doubt you need the added security it promises, especially if you compare it with Windows. Start with a "normal" Linux distro, a mainstream one with a pretty GUI like Mint perhaps. Later you can look into Qubes.

The question then is what tasks you want to accomplish with your computer, and what tools are available to do this. Just switch over; perhaps keep a Windows installation around just in case you hit a roadblock.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 09:17 PM   #7
frankbell
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I still have one Windows install because of a DRM archive of a periodical which I purchased quite legally and want to be able to use, plus I like keeping my Windows hand in. Other than that, it's all Linux all the time.

Pick a distro you feel comfortable with. If you don't have an entire computer to throw at Linux, dual-boot if you feel you must keep Windows available.

I recommend a mainstream distro, not an offshoot. Debian, Mint, a *buntu if you must, Mageia, OpenSUSE, Slackware are all good candidates. Then stick with that distro for at least three months and learn how it works. If you run into a difficulty, figure it out (we and many others are here to help); don't hop to another distro to get away from it.

Remind that Linux is not Windows. It can be made to look like Windows, but, under the hood, it is different. Expect it to be different and expect a learning curve. Remind yourself that there was a learning curve to Windows also; you just didn't notice it.

I started with Slackware. It was an accident, but one I've never regretted (the first distro I tried to install I forget what it was didn't install).
 
Old 11-24-2015, 09:36 PM   #8
jefro
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I'm not for or against OS really. Use what works I say. Not everyone is able to use linux or IOS or QNX or vmx or what not.

If you have time you may be able to run a free virtual machine and test out some different OS's within your windows.

Last edited by jefro; 11-24-2015 at 09:37 PM.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 10:47 PM   #9
yancek
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Quote:
My current interest is in Qubes but I am not particularly clever at downloading it.
I don't know why anyone would need to be 'clever' to click on a link to download a file. From a brief reading of the Qubes home page, it doesn't seem like the kind of distribution that would be good for a new user. You might go to the distrowatch site at the link below which has a listing of a large number of different Linux distributions with links to each so you can read about them and decide for yourself.

You don't give any details on what a 'suitable replacement' would be. What do you use the computer to do? If you play a lot of games, stick with windows. If you have other specific uses, post more requirements and someone should be able to make a suggestion.

http://distrowatch.com/
 
Old 11-24-2015, 11:11 PM   #10
John VV
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Quote:
but regrettably have never found a suitable replacement. I have tried a number of the Linux OS but none that could compare to Windows.
then STAY with Microsoft !!!
your thinking about a operating system is a bit OFF

Linux is NOT a FREE copy of windows
never was and never will be

think of moving from Windows to linux as
" moving from windows to Apple "
"moving from say New York to Miami "


Linux IS NOT Windows !!!
it is Linux based computer operating system


pick one of the top 5 distros
OpenSUSE
LinuxMint
Debian8
or even Fedora23 (if you LIKE to tinker with things )
 
Old 11-25-2015, 12:29 PM   #11
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parko View Post
I have attempted on numerous occasions to abandon Windows (currently Windows10) but regrettably have never found a suitable replacement. I have tried a number of the Linux OS but none that could compare to Windows.
If you tell us exactly where your attempts went wrong and in what way the Linux distros "couldn't compare to Windows", then maybe we could tell you how to have a more satisfactory experience. Of course, we might just recommend you to stick to Windows, but it's worth a try!
 
Old 11-25-2015, 04:26 PM   #12
TxLonghorn
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There will always be a learning curve with any new technology or operating system. But I can assure you that it is worth the effort to move to a linux OS. You will be glad you did.
One big difference that is not apparent to a Windows user is the fact that with each linux OS there is a repository of hundreds of programs which have been tested to some extent, and approved for that OS. And they are virus-free.
That is unlike Windows where you have to search for freeware or shareware or $ware on the www, and you don't know if you are installing a trust-worthy program or a gremlin that will bite you in the rear.
Some popular linux distributions for beginners are: Linux Mint, Korora, Zorin, PCLinuxOS, Netrunner.
And it is cool that not only can you chose your linux distro, you have a variety of desktops to chose from, so that you can chose the one that suits you: Cinnamon, Mate, Gnome3, KDE, xfce, etc.
Many of the distributions come in "live" downloads that you can run from a DVD or USB without installing them to your hard drive. That gives you the opportunity to check out several, easily.
 
Old 11-25-2015, 04:44 PM   #13
Philip Lacroix
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Parko, if you want to use a Linux operating system, then in my opinion you should do that by pursuing a positive goal, not a negative one. In other words, start using Linux because you want to learn Linux, not because you want to "jettison" (or "replace") Windows. The latter might eventually come as a side effect, or it might not, depending on your needs and dedication.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 11-26-2015, 07:17 PM   #14
Parko
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Got The Message!

Okay guys, I have got the message! As the disks are readily available on the Net and at a reasonable price I will purchase a few in an attempt to find one with which I am comfortable. My thanks to you all for your rapid replies; much appreciated!
 
Old 11-26-2015, 10:12 PM   #15
John VV
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buy a few WHAT!!!!!

all iso images are free
well you do need to pay for the RedHat support if you use redhat

but
Mint 17 is FREE
OpenSUSE 13.2 is FREE
Debain 8 is FREE
Fedora 23 is FREE
Slackware is FREE
Ubuntu is FREE

and so on ....
 
  


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