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Old 02-13-2010, 06:38 AM   #1
ieatbunnies
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Any suggestions for a linux command publication?


pdf would be great and although i have searched a little bit for one some of them don't seem friendly or helpful. i don't know but you get the point..

suggestions or links ???
 
Old 02-13-2010, 06:56 AM   #2
carltm
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There are thousands of documents that might be what you want and
might not be. Can you say more specifically what you're looking for?
Do you just want a list of commands? Do you want a basic syntax guide?
Do you want some type of tutorial or howto guide?
 
Old 02-13-2010, 08:15 AM   #3
knudfl
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Good old "Rute" is a place to start ..
http://linux.2038bug.com/rute-home.html
http://freshmeat.net/projects/rute/

And please have a look at some of the 'built-in'
manuals : the command is 'man' →
man man
man ls
man find
man grep
.. etc. etc.
.....
 
Old 02-13-2010, 09:01 AM   #4
worm5252
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dont forget another built in command is info
info man
info ls
info find
...

I would say look on google for Linux CLI commands. You may also want to search for CLI commands on a particular topic if you want something more specific. If you are looking for new tricks to manage your system look at a few books on hacking Linux.
 
Old 02-14-2010, 06:46 PM   #5
chrism01
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This web version of the manpages is pretty good http://linux.die.net/man/

As above, Rute is very good; see also
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

For more guides/manuals than you can shake an HDD at, try
http://www.linuxtopia.org
 
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Old 02-15-2010, 03:48 AM   #6
Fred Caro
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command guide

Suggestions so far just copy what has gone before.
Try reading 'Linux in a NUTshell' as a newbie, it's enough to put anyone off. There is not even a decent index. It is really a reference book for the knowing. Given that, it is authoritative which is a bonus when you are all at sea.
Technical writing is a skill, especially when you are talking to those who are ignorant (positive usage) and few books do that well, even fewer cater for an intermediate level. The confusion may have led from an over simplification earlier?

Fred.
 
Old 02-15-2010, 06:28 AM   #7
slightlystoopid
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"Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible" was the only command line "publication" I ever read, and I still use it as reference for somethings, but chrism's list is definitely the best online resources.
 
Old 02-15-2010, 07:21 AM   #8
cantab
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If you want a physical book, O'Reilly's "Linux Pocket Guide" is great. It doesn't cover everything, just the commonly used stuff. Makes for a compact (about the size of a Nintendo DS), concise, and cheap book. Includes a primer on bash shell scripting that covers all the basics - variables, ifs, loops, stuff like that.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Linux-Pocket.../dp/0596006284
 
Old 02-15-2010, 07:30 AM   #9
brianL
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Another paperback: Linux Phrasebook.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Linux-Phrase...=books&qid=126
 
Old 02-15-2010, 07:36 AM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

This is a general list of links that I present to new users;

Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking
Virtualiation- Top 10


The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 02-15-2010, 10:28 PM   #11
ieatbunnies
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thanks peeps. i think i sent a thanks to all. there are lots available
 
Old 02-16-2010, 01:17 AM   #12
Fred Caro
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best books

If I can add to the list and I do not see why a newbie should be put off by the command line unless we want to go back years but it is good to have as a stand by or an alternative, etc but not what a user is looking for at first glance.

Best linux writers include:

Kier Thomas and Christopher Negus.

There are many others but I would recommend the former. 'Beginning SUSE linux' being an example of.
Experts tend to forget their origins!

Fred.
 
Old 02-16-2010, 01:33 AM   #13
GlennsPref
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Hi, onebuck and cantab have covered some good links to good content there.

If you want more, check out Jerry Peaks Linux articles, from his webpage....

The "wizard bootcamp series" and "from bash to zshell".

Links to pdf's and html pages here....

http://www.jpeek.com/articles/linux_magazine.html

Cheers, Glenn
 
  


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