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Old 07-22-2013, 05:45 PM   #1
melodicstranger
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Alternative solution for sending large files directly


I own a new recording studio and we have been using cloud storage like Dropbox to send large files to our clients. However, I feel there must be a more practical solution that having to wait hours for the files to upload to dropbox in order for a client to download them.

I thought there might be some simple Ubuntu style OS that I could install on a junk PC. Then from that PC I'd be able to plug in a USB containing the files, place them in a folder and then share that folder to my client over the net.

Obviously security is very important as we would only want only recipient and their invited guests to have access to that folder and no one else. The other thing that I imagine may be an issue is that of the dynamic IP address which our ISP provides. Would I need to have a static IP address for such a thing should it exist?

I'd love to know your thoughts!

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 07-22-2013, 05:53 PM   #2
Kustom42
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Ok well you have a lot of questions here and I'll try to answer what I can.

First, the dynamic IP problem is easily resolved by using dyn.com/dns or a similar solution. Most routers, especially Cisco/Linksys branded ones, already have an API function built in to talk to dyn.com so that if your ISP updates your IP it will login to dyn.com and update your DNS record. Very handy and I use it to be able to RDP to my home systems from wherever I'm at.


Secondly, you could very easily setup an ftp server or even an nfs mount on a system in your office. This would save you the time of having to upload the data but the client would still have to download the data and they would end up downloading the data from your connection which I can assure has a lot less bandwidth and stability than say dropbox or something similar.


It looks like your real problem here is your up speed causing you to have to wait for your uploads to finish. You may be able to just call your ISP and pay an extra 5 or 10 bucks a month and get some more upload bandwidth for you to use.


There are also several unknowns to hosting your own ftp/nfs server. Will your ISP even allow the connections on those ports? Will they require you to purchase a "Business" or "Enterprise" plan in order to open those ports? Do you have the actual infrastructure to maintain the stability of your network?

Think about these sort of things because it will be a lot worse if your client cant download the file because your ISP is dropping the connection or you run into some other BS problem that comes with dealing with hosting an external service than it will if you just have to tell them to wait a couple hours.
 
Old 07-22-2013, 06:01 PM   #3
melodicstranger
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Thanks Kustum42 for your speedy response. Much appreciated and your advice is taken on board! I'll ring up the ISP tomorrow and see what they can do. It's a shame that there isn't some simple solution out there for this, but from what your saying I can understand why.

Thanks again!
 
Old 07-22-2013, 06:03 PM   #4
melodicstranger
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Kustom42,

I've just had another response from another forum suggesting I look into BitTorrent Sync. Here's his reply:

Quote:
BitTorrent Sync is the tool you want to look at.

Basically you run it (on *nix, by default web UI is used), access it using a browser, add a directory containing the stuff you want to share, generate a secret (to share with only the client).

On the client side, add a folder with the secret provided, it starts syncing.

Although file transfers are encrypted (Your information is never stored on a server in the cloud and your data is protected by private keys), DO encrypt you files (e.g. TrueCrypt) before you share to add an extra layer of security.
What do you think of that?
 
Old 07-22-2013, 06:09 PM   #5
Kustom42
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That is quite a bit more sketchy than hosting your own ftp server and you would still be hosting an external service. Ask yourself this, have you EVER had a company tell you to torrent a download from them? Can you expect a customer to know what a torrent is, ask them to install a third party piece of software(BitTorrent or similar) just to download your file?


IF you wanted to host your files the FTP server is the proper way to do it. You can secure your data behind logins, data will be transmitted in plain text but if you were to honestly know the amount your personal information is transmitted in plain text you would realize its not that big of a deal. You can also create a sftp, or secure ftp, server but most people who ask for this usually do not actually need it and are just wanting that warm and comfy feeling on the inside that having the word secure in their service provides.
 
Old 07-22-2013, 08:25 PM   #6
Firerat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melodicstranger View Post
Kustom42,

I've just had another response from another forum suggesting I look into BitTorrent Sync. Here's his reply:



What do you think of that?
If you have *many* clients downloading the same data, then yes BitTorrent is a option. this is as long as they ( the clients ) are willing to upload what they have downloaded, even after they have fully downloaded it.

Realistically, as Kustom42 points out, you need to talk with ISP and pay a premium for a premium upload service.
Coupled with that you may need a premium hosting service, so your client can download at a rate greater than you uploaded it.


What kind of size are we talking here?

Last edited by Firerat; 07-22-2013 at 08:27 PM. Reason: tyop, prob more
 
  


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