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Old 05-27-2004, 03:48 PM   #16
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally posted by darthtux
I agree that would be stupid and would also create just another security problem.
Just imagine a n00b setting up his machine that way,
preferably with a passwordless login into X ;)



Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 05-27-2004, 03:56 PM   #17
Nis
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Quote:
If this doesn't work I will just uninstall mandrake and give up on it because this is crucial to doing things.
Don't give up just because Linux is being more secure than XP (which lets anyone have Administrator privlegdes on a whim). The reason you don't want to have an account with root privledges is simple. Newbie is told to 'rm -rf /' to solve his problem. With root privledges that newbie is screwed. If he's logged in as himself, he'll just wipe his home directory. Most people on this bored are very nice and helpful to newbies, but there could be a bad apple who would really suggest the idea above. If you must have root privledges, then su or sudo as Tink and darthtux have suggested. If you have a problem with that, then accept the fact that they have years more experience with Linux then you and they are only speaking through wisdom gained through experience.

I guess I'm rambling so I'll leave with this quote I saw somewhere:
"Do not take the name of root in vain"
 
Old 05-27-2004, 05:41 PM   #18
NonSumPisces
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I respect you guys, as long as I get some respect back. I'm just trying to learn about a to entirely new OS. I cannot yet fathom the true possibilities of this OS, that's why I saw no alternative to creating a root account to use in the gui. You guys have shown me a better alternative, kudos to you for that, but plz plz plz plz plz don't take me for a computer illiterate, I've been using computers and doing some quite serious shit with them since I could read, only not so much using unix based systems.

Btw, I knew what rm -rf did before I could create a folder using the shell :P

Thx again.

l1n\/X r0xxx.

Last edited by NonSumPisces; 05-27-2004 at 05:45 PM.
 
Old 05-27-2004, 05:57 PM   #19
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally posted by NonSumPisces
I respect you guys, as long as I get some respect back. I'm just trying to learn about a to entirely new OS. I cannot yet fathom the true possibilities of this OS, that's why I saw no alternative to creating a root account to use in the gui. You guys have shown me a better alternative, kudos to you for that, but plz plz plz plz plz don't take me for a computer illiterate, I've been using computers and doing some quite serious shit with them since I could read, only not so much using unix based systems.

Btw, I knew what rm -rf did before I could create a folder using the shell :P

Thx again.

l1n\/X r0xxx.
You're more than welcome ...

And on the topic of respect:
When in Rome, do like the Romans. Watch and learn.

The thing is that you have your mind set on what you think
should be possible, or an idea on how it should be done. If
this, however, is a "cultural no-no", a taboo that you don't
know about, you'll get responses that will not necessarily be
what you want to hear, moreover, not necessarily in what
you think is the way you deserve to be talked to.

Consider this a school. ;) If you're starting with driving
lessons you (hopefully!) won't expect the driving instructor
to be courteous but rather have him save your butt, probably
even in a very rude manner. :}


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 05-27-2004, 07:12 PM   #20
NonSumPisces
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tinkster
You're more than welcome ...

And on the topic of respect:
When in Rome, do like the Romans. Watch and learn.

The thing is that you have your mind set on what you think
should be possible, or an idea on how it should be done. If
this, however, is a "cultural no-no", a taboo that you don't
know about, you'll get responses that will not necessarily be
what you want to hear, moreover, not necessarily in what
you think is the way you deserve to be talked to.

Consider this a school. If you're starting with driving
lessons you (hopefully!) won't expect the driving instructor
to be courteous but rather have him save your butt, probably
even in a very rude manner. :}


Cheers,
Tink
You've got a point, but I don't take discourtesy quietly unless I really don't have a choice
Isn't "the golden rule" of interacting with others that you should treat others the way you want them to treat you?
If one tries to follow that rule, one has to buy the flipside of it too, namely that one should treat others the way they treat you.
Some people doesn't deserve respect, but I give it to them anyways unless they persist in being moronic scumbags
If that's the case, I first try to change their ways in a polite manner, but if that doesn't work, I bring out all the nasty stuff from my bag of "one billion ways of making idiots feel like shit eating, stinking, festering, worthless maggots" But still, I belive most people deserve at the very least some respect, and you are aparantly one of them

Cherios.
 
Old 05-27-2004, 07:36 PM   #21
darthtux
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Quote:
Originally posted by NonSumPisces
I respect you guys, as long as I get some respect back. I'm just trying to learn about a to entirely new OS. I cannot yet fathom the true possibilities of this OS, that's why I saw no alternative to creating a root account to use in the gui. You guys have shown me a better alternative, kudos to you for that, but plz plz plz plz plz don't take me for a computer illiterate, I've been using computers and doing some quite serious shit with them since I could read, only not so much using unix based systems.

Btw, I knew what rm -rf did before I could create a folder using the shell :P

Thx again.

l1n\/X r0xxx.
You're welcome. It does take time to learn. I'm still learning. I don't take you for a "computer illiterate". I remember when I first started using Linux. One of the first things I learned was su. You still have to watch out though. Sometimes you might forget you are su'd as root.

I remember one time I rm -rf * I thought I was in a certain directory when I was in my home dir. The command went longer than a second and I realized something was wrong and hit ctr-c. Luckily it didn't do any damage. Probably what I get for have several terminals open Now I have the PATH in my command line and check before doing any damage.

BTW, this is the best damn Linux forum around! You're in the right place.
 
Old 05-27-2004, 07:39 PM   #22
arnyswart
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Forget it this boy has migrated back to fedora core since we are talking but nobody is understanding each other.

Arny!
 
Old 02-13-2005, 08:39 PM   #23
Jimbo99
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You guys need to STOP telling these guys what they want instead you need to give him the answer he's looking for. Shut the fuck up about what he shouldn't have and give him whatever he's asking for. Stop judging what he wants and just answer the damn questions.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 02-14-2005, 05:57 AM   #24
Wim Sturkenboom
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Although I don't have Mandrake at this moment, it's most probably a setting somewhere along the line. In Ubuntu, there's a setting (under login screen setup) that enables/disables root login over the gdm; in Mandrake probably as well.
In Ubuntu, it influences the setting AllowRoot in gdm.conf.

Question: what is GDM? Gnome Display Manager In that case, this only applies to gnome.

// edit
Found the answer on http://yippi.hypermall.com/gdm/index.shtml . It's the program that shows the login screen.
This explains why this influences Gnome and WindowMaker (and probably all others) under Slackware.


Further I don't see a problem to login as root as long as the user is aware of it (that's probably personal or lack of knowledge about security). Same rules apply for console login as root. Just be aware of what you do.
I use a different desktop background colour (red) to warm me that I'm logged in as root.
Things are often easier to do with a GUI (also due to lack of knowledge).

Last edited by Wim Sturkenboom; 02-14-2005 at 07:53 AM.
 
Old 12-16-2009, 04:16 PM   #25
mbushroe
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Duplicate Superuser accounts CAN make sense

In this thread, many people have jumped on the original poster for wanting something stupid and unsecure. I am looking to do much the same thing, and I have a very good reason for it. To show that Linux is so universal that almost anything can make sense _somewhere_, let me describe my case.

I work on an embedded Linux Etherswitch/router. It was made (and is still repaired) by a subcontractor to us, but the we still provides support for it to a company that we are subcontractors to. The system is a very stripped down RedHat derivative, and runs almost exclusively as root. It is command line only, no room on the tiny flash card for gui's, or even VI. There are very few secondary, specialty accounts like ftp. In Houston's test lab, they have may computers in the local net connected to these, and need passwords on the ftp user account to keep the other ftp servers separate from them. We just got a unit back for repair and testing, and could not ftp up the test configuration files, because they did not send us the passwords along with the unit. And not surprisingly, they resit doing that, and want to be able to change the root, ftp, and a few of the other special account passwords as their in-house security requires. When we get the computers back for testing or repair, we need to be able to access the ftp account, so we either need to be given the current password with every device shipped back to us, or the ability to reset the ftp password without knowing its current value.

It seems to me that the best compromise is to allow them to set, modify, and keep to themselves all the accounts and passwords but one. We create and maintain one. But to be able to change the password on ftp, up load files and make any other needed changes, we pretty much need a superuser account. But of course _they_ want to have a superuser account. And we each want private control of the superuser password. So two, equivalent, superuser accounts, both useid 0, grouid 0, but different names and different passwords. And for anyone else stuck in this spot. The command line command useradd accepts an option "-o", the overrides the requirement to have unique user IDs when creating a new account, and will allow you to make two or more superusers, that have unique login names and password, but will all run as root.


Mike
(P.S. sorry for my first post being so long!)
 
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Old 07-24-2013, 01:48 PM   #26
route_ranger
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SU_Who?

To all those who smugly responded with condescending instructions on how to simply do a "SUDO" (as if the questioner didn't know that already), perhaps you should listen to the question rather than trying to sound superior.

Because there's nothing superior about omitting the fact that you need the Superuser account password on most production servers in order to do a SUDO. And if you can't give the superuser account password out to the individual needing superuser access to install something on the server, then repeating over and over how to do a SUDO really is anything but superior or erudite. Your "policies" are not everyone's policies, and calling something stupid, just because your own limited thinking never bothered to consider the fact that maybe they can't give out the superuser password, (or set it to not use a password) then you're left with the issue of creating an account that will permit the user to do what they need to do (then disable it when they're done).

This is why these forums are difficult to read. And Mike? You said it right.

Last edited by route_ranger; 07-24-2013 at 01:50 PM.
 
Old 07-24-2013, 02:02 PM   #27
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by route_ranger View Post
To all those who smugly responded with condescending instructions on how to simply do a "SUDO" (as if the questioner didn't know that already), perhaps you should listen to the question rather than trying to sound superior.

Because there's nothing superior about omitting the fact that you need the Superuser account password on most production servers in order to do a SUDO. And if you can't give the superuser account password out to the individual needing superuser access to install something on the server, then repeating over and over how to do a SUDO really is anything but superior or erudite. Your "policies" are not everyone's policies, and calling something stupid, just because your own limited thinking never bothered to consider the fact that maybe they can't give out the superuser password, (or set it to not use a password) then you're left with the issue of creating an account that will permit the user to do what they need to do (then disable it when they're done).

This is why these forums are difficult to read.
Not the dates on old/closed threads...the last post in this one was four years ago. If you had read the whole thread, you'd see where the OP was given two options, aside from "su" and "sudo" to accomplish what they want, but were told NOT TO, since it's a bad idea. It was when the thread was opened (NINE years ago), and remains one now. And if they're new users, how would they 'already know' about sudo, and what it does?
Quote:
And Mike? You said it right.
And you missed the point of what Mike said...they ship devices to customers, not have their own systems in-house. A customer/embedded device needs support, so having a root-equivalent account makes sense in that one very-narrow context. Logging in through the GUI as root doesn't, and never will. And did you read the LQ Rules before posting?
Quote:
Originally Posted by LQ Rules
Do not post if you do not have anything constructive to say in the post.
So, why don't you share your method of solving the problem, since you think what's been posted is "sounding superior" or "condescending". Both sudo and su have been covered, as well as creating a new user ID with GID 0, and aliasing.
 
Old 07-24-2013, 02:13 PM   #28
route_ranger
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@B1gM0wth

1. I read as far as I could until the smug comments like yours made it impossible to continue.

2. The solution is to use the override if you need two users with super user privileges and can't give out the password.

3. You can also set the password file to not require a password for SUDO, then change it back when the users done.

That's what I'd have told him.

What I'd tell you is outside of forum posting guidelines.
 
Old 07-24-2013, 02:23 PM   #29
szboardstretcher
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I suggest locking this thread. Too old to be of any practical use. And there is no need to have comments from a trolling sock-puppet account.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-24-2013, 02:24 PM   #30
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by route_ranger View Post
1. I read as far as I could until the smug comments like yours made it impossible to continue.
...which is why your comments made no sense.
Quote:
2. The solution is to use the override if you need two users with super user privileges and can't give out the password.
...which was told to the OP twice, in two different ways.
Quote:
3. You can also set the password file to not require a password for SUDO, then change it back when the users done.
That's what I'd have told him.
...which YOU said they shouldn't do, and telling them to use SUDO was superior, erudite, and the product of limited thinking.
Quote:
What I'd tell you is outside of forum posting guidelines.
....and you still don't post any of your own ideas, that aren't the product of 'limited thinking'.

So...are you going to post your own solution??
 
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