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-   -   A Mac refugee and flight simmer writer... (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/a-mac-refugee-and-flight-simmer-writer-4175438637/)

Verkitso 11-25-2012 10:54 AM

A Mac refugee and flight simmer writer...
 
Hello everyone.

My name is Richard, I'm 39 years old, based in the UK and I'm a Mac user. I'm also a long-term flight sim addict, which is where my problems start.

Basically, I'm interested in X-Plane, but I'm aware that my Mac would really creak if it was asked to run the software. As a result, I'm looking around for something else with a bit more power and can't make myself use Windows. By contrast, Linux looks like a great option but I know the square root of bog all about what to do next or about what it's likely to cost and I have all the technical know-how of a walnut.

Please help!

resetreset 11-25-2012 02:31 PM

OK, I don't know what X-Plane is, but Ubuntu does come with some flight-sim games in its app store (this is 10.10, quite an old distro).
It won't cost anything if you download it, or maybe you can try UK mags like Linux Format and Linux User to see whether they have something interesting in their cover discs.
After that, you'll have to install it naturally, but I have no idea what to do on a Mac - I'm just assuming you'll get a PC from somewhere. See if there is a Linux User group in your area, and someone is willing to give you a hand with installing it, especially installing it while keeping your Windows or Mac OS partition intact.

After that, come back here, and ask away..... :)

millgates 11-25-2012 04:24 PM

Hello and welcome to linuxquestions.org!

You'll be glad to know that X-Plane runs very nicely (and natively) on linux. Unfortunately, not all of the add-ons support linux. You may also try flightgear if you haven't tried it yet.

So just pick a distribution and enjoy! If you have any problems/questions, just ask around. I hope, you will find the answers to most of your questions here.

Elv13 11-25-2012 05:52 PM

Just a little clarification, you have to choose a Linux distribution, like Ubuntu. You cannot install "Linux" on your computer directly. Ubuntu show some similarities with Mac OSX, so you should get used to it, but learning a new operation system will always require open mind and time. It wont be easy, especially with Linux. It is not the most trivial / "get out of your way" OS on earth, Max OSX is. Using Linux is equal to learning Linux, anyone denying this is ether lying to have some sort of "getting used to and forgetting the real world" syndrome. You can download Ubuntu at http://www.ubuntu.com/, you can use the 12.04 version if you don't want to have updates too often or go with the 6-monthly update cycle with 12.10. To install it, you need to install bootcamp in OSX and make some room for a Linux partition. Do _NOT_ format your system, it most likely wont boot anymore. Just make space with bootcamp. You then need to burn the DVD _AS DISK IMAGE_, not copy pasting the .iso on the DVD, it wont work. Then reboot with the DVD. If it fail, look around for the dedicated Mac version if Ubuntu for Intel. It is usually not necessary, but for some Macs, it require to use that version.

chrism01 11-26-2012 01:22 AM

You can find a long list of available Linux distributions (aka 'distros') here www.distrowatch.com.
Note that Linux is free (although you can pay for support eg RHEL).

The base HW for Linux is Intel/AMD, but ports do exist for some other HW types.
What machine spec do you intend to install to?

Note also that many distros have a 'LiveCd' version, which runs entirely off your CD/DVD drive, so you can test before installing.

HTH & Welcome to LQ :)

cascade9 11-26-2012 02:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Verkitso (Post 4836595)
I'm also a long-term flight sim addict, which is where my problems start.

The 1st step is to admit you have a problem... :D

Quote:

Originally Posted by Verkitso (Post 4836595)
Basically, I'm interested in X-Plane, but I'm aware that my Mac would really creak if it was asked to run the software. As a result, I'm looking around for something else with a bit more power and can't make myself use Windows. By contrast, Linux looks like a great option but I know the square root of bog all about what to do next or about what it's likely to cost and I have all the technical know-how of a walnut.

X-Plane has farily low requirements-

Quote:

X-Plane 10 requires, at the minimum,

a 2 GHz, dual-core CPU,
2 GB of RAM,
a DVD-ROM, and
a DirectX 9.0c-capable video card with 128 MB of on-board, dedicated video RAM (VRAM). See here for graphics card compatibility.

However, for the best experience, we recommend the following:

a 3 GHz, multi-core CPU (or, even better, multiple processors),
4 GB of RAM,
a DVD-ROM, and
a DirectX 10-capable (DX11 preferred) video card with 1 GB of on-board, dedicated VRAM.

X-Plane will take advantage of as many cores or distinct processors as you can afford. Having 16 cores split among 4 CPUs is not required by any means, but Version 10 would be able to use every one. No more than 4 GB of RAM is necessary, but the more VRAM you have, the better–X-Plane 10 can easily use 1.5 GB of VRAM at the maximum settings.

In order to use the full version of X-Plane, Disc 1 of the installation DVDs must be in your disc drive when launching the simulator. (This is not the case when using X-Plane for Professional Use; in that case, the USB key replaces the Disc 1 DVD.)

When running X-Plane on Linux, please note that you must install the proprietary Nvidia or AMD drivers. X-Plane will not run using Gallium or Mesa open-source drivers.
http://www.x-plane.com/desktop/system-requirements/

From the framerates I'm seeing for X-Plane 10 you'll really want a good gamers video card.
8GB (or more) RAM (its cheap now).
A quad core intel i5/i7 or 6/8 core AMD bulldozer/piledriver CPU.

Motherboard, HDD/SSD, case, power supply, etc. as well.

What is your budget?
Do you have a computer store you use on a regular basis?

Verkitso 11-27-2012 07:59 AM

Thanks for all the answers and apologies for not checking back. Work is going through a slightly demanding phase at the moment, which is very annoying when all you want to do is fly...

Anyway. My work has forced my hand and I've had to buy a new Mac laptop, which means that, for the time being, my budget has gone into minus figures. On the bright side, that means I'm free to plot and scheme about my ideal machine. So. I'm based in the UK, so all of these calculations are in pounds, but even with recharged funds I'm not going to have much more than £500 to play with. If it's not possible to build a half decent, games-orientated Linux machine for this then it's a pity, but... I'd like to know now!

cascade9 11-29-2012 02:46 AM

Its possible to build a system for 500 quid that is decent for gaming. Provided that you dont need a monitor, keybaord, mouse and speakers/headphones anyway. ;)


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