LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-09-2009, 09:55 AM   #1
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Rep: Reputation: 16
A linux OS that teaches you how to use linux?


ever heard of one?
 
Old 05-09-2009, 10:03 AM   #2
saivin
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: CentOS, openSUSE, Mandriva, Slackware
Posts: 111

Rep: Reputation: 19
In what sense?
 
Old 05-09-2009, 11:36 AM   #3
student04
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Georgia
Distribution: OS X, CentOS
Posts: 669

Rep: Reputation: 34
Hm, I'd say any distribution that does little auto-configuring for you. You would be learning many specifics only applicable to that distribution in addition to learning linux, but that comes with the package. Examples: gentoo, slackware, debian, LFS (?). I haven't heard of a distribution specifically oriented towards learning the command line, running services, configuring package installs, etc. You learn as you go, pretty much (and by using this forum ).
 
Old 05-09-2009, 01:03 PM   #4
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
Quote:
A linux OS that teaches you how to use linux?
All of them.....
 
Old 05-09-2009, 01:23 PM   #5
mmmichael
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Distribution: Ubuntu,Puppy,Zenwalk,FreeBSD
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
LFS (Linux From Scratch) http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
teaches you how to build your own distro from source, and you can learn a lot about how linux works. If you're looking to learn desktop or command line basics, there are plenty of online tutorials and forums (just google "linux command line") and use any distro you like.
 
Old 05-09-2009, 01:39 PM   #6
dxqcanada
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 702

Rep: Reputation: 43
Gentoo.

Like LFS ... after the initial installation you are left with a command prompt.
Everything else must be installed and configured, that includes networking, X Windows, Users ... etc.
User's are instructed to manually modify configuration files.
Gentoo instructional guides are very extensive.
 
Old 05-10-2009, 06:26 PM   #7
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmichael View Post
LFS (Linux From Scratch) http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
teaches you how to build your own distro from source, and you can learn a lot about how linux works. If you're looking to learn desktop or command line basics, there are plenty of online tutorials and forums (just google "linux command line") and use any distro you like.
This is exactly the direction I'd like to head in, Do you have any personal experience with LFS?
 
Old 05-10-2009, 06:28 PM   #8
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dxqcanada View Post
Gentoo.

Like LFS ... after the initial installation you are left with a command prompt.
Everything else must be installed and configured, that includes networking, X Windows, Users ... etc.
User's are instructed to manually modify configuration files.
Gentoo instructional guides are very extensive.
I've done some brief reading on LFS, and it seems like it's what I'm going for in terms of needing to learn from the ground up...
You would say that gentoo is in this same category?
 
Old 05-10-2009, 07:37 PM   #9
senseproof
Member
 
Registered: May 2009
Distribution: Fedora 10
Posts: 31
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 16
'll list them for you in order (major distros only):

LFS
Slackware
Gentoo
Debian

After that they are all much of a much, for example I am always rolling my own packages in Fedora and if you read the docs it tells you how to do it. This means I'm experiencing as much about the process as a LFS user.

What I think you want it something that *forces* you to learn. If you are a total Linux newbie, LFS is a tall order and the knowledge you gain from it is mostly only relevant if you want to be a C programmer (compared to other "low-help" distros) I'd start with Gentoo (complicated packaging system which reveals much of the internals), migrate to Slackware (which is like Gentoo without the packaging infrastructure) then move to a distribution which actually has proper package support like Fedora (or Debian) - the old yum vs apt, it's apples and apples really..

senseproof: ducks flamatov cocktails from annnoyed Slacktoo users

Last edited by senseproof; 05-10-2009 at 07:42 PM.
 
Old 05-10-2009, 08:31 PM   #10
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
K, you leave me wondering alot of questions:
1.What does the term 'roll your own package' mean?
2.How is it that LFS is mostly relevant to C programmers?
3.In what sense does Gentoo reveal the internals?

You are correct with your statement of me wanting an OS that 'forces me to learn'. Really that's what I want, the option that's going to force me to learn the most.

Quote:
Originally Posted by senseproof View Post
'll list them for you in order (major distros only):

LFS
Slackware
Gentoo
Debian

After that they are all much of a much, for example I am always rolling my own packages in Fedora and if you read the docs it tells you how to do it. This means I'm experiencing as much about the process as a LFS user.

What I think you want it something that *forces* you to learn. If you are a total Linux newbie, LFS is a tall order and the knowledge you gain from it is mostly only relevant if you want to be a C programmer (compared to other "low-help" distros) I'd start with Gentoo (complicated packaging system which reveals much of the internals), migrate to Slackware (which is like Gentoo without the packaging infrastructure) then move to a distribution which actually has proper package support like Fedora (or Debian) - the old yum vs apt, it's apples and apples really..

senseproof: ducks flamatov cocktails from annnoyed Slacktoo users
 
Old 05-11-2009, 03:48 AM   #11
H_TeXMeX_H
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285Reputation: 1285
slackware or debian or gentoo
 
Old 05-11-2009, 04:02 AM   #12
synss
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Debian, Gentoo, Mac OS X
Posts: 137

Rep: Reputation: 22
I agree that you will learn more about C than about Linux with LFS. And this may not be a bad thing, but maybe not what you are looking for and not the best way to learn C either. LFS and Gentoo are time consuming, and most of the time will be spent compiling, so you are not going to get much from watching lines of gcc instructions flowing down the screen.

I would personally recommend Archlinux because pretty much everything Linux-related is simple and written in Bash. That allows you to modify or read how it works. It is a binary distro, so that you need a few minutes to install X + Gnome (instead of 2 days for source distros). The package manager still allows you to (re)compile whatever you feel like compiling.

But in the end, it all comes down to how much time you want to invest in learning what goes on under the hood, not on the distro you are using. There is a lot of information online, about the kernel, shell scripting, udev, apache, etc. Reading this will do more for you than spending 2 weeks installing LFS.
 
Old 05-11-2009, 11:59 AM   #13
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by synss View Post
Reading this will do more for you than spending 2 weeks installing LFS.
I agree with you that those are things certainly worth reading and looking into, but for someone like me, I'm not good with abstraction and I don't really get a grasp on something until i've done it myself... I suppose that's the main appeal I have with something like LFS. The books are great but until i've done and seen it. I just doesn't register...
 
Old 05-11-2009, 02:37 PM   #14
farslayer
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,232
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 190Reputation: 190
Theres also a couple LIVE CD training Options.. for a true beginner LFS is probably a bit much..

Ubuntu Desktop Course Course companion for Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Privare Learn Linux Course Live CD with Linux Turorials. Watch the video then do it yourself.

elpicx_2.0 Dual boot Live CD used to prepare for the LPI Certification..


Just to throw them out there.
 
Old 05-11-2009, 03:48 PM   #15
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by farslayer View Post
Theres also a couple LIVE CD training Options.. for a true beginner LFS is probably a bit much..

Ubuntu Desktop Course Course companion for Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Privare Learn Linux Course Live CD with Linux Turorials. Watch the video then do it yourself.

elpicx_2.0 Dual boot Live CD used to prepare for the LPI Certification..


Just to throw them out there.
Awesome find! I'd been wondering if such a thing existed... but from what i gather, the freeloaderlinux and ubuntu cds seem to be very very basic introductions. Not sure about the LPI cert one...

Last edited by cynicalpsycho; 05-11-2009 at 03:54 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: New online class teaches basic Linux for free LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 11-22-2006 07:21 AM
LXer: Hardware/software kit teaches embedded Linux LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-19-2006 12:03 PM
Windows screensaver that teaches linux akudewan General 6 01-21-2006 06:18 PM
LXer: Obsidian teaches open source basics LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 01-10-2006 06:31 AM
LXer: Teen teaches Google to share LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-12-2005 02:31 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:16 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration