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Old 03-25-2009, 03:17 AM   #1
chownuseradd
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2 virtualization nodes on one box


This question was posed to me today and I really could use some help in answering it. What would be one of the main reasons for having two virtualization nodes on the same server? Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
 
Old 03-25-2009, 03:38 AM   #2
reptiler
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I'd say logical separation of services.
Let's say you use OpenVZ for virtualization, as it has very low overhead and allows the VM to run at more or less native speed, you can easily deploy several virtual servers on one physical server and thus separate different services from each other, like having DNS run on one VM, a proxy on another.
As servers get more powerful it is easy to run several, not only two, VMs on one physical server.
For example: I use KVM for desktop-virtualization and can easily run two VMs with full GUI. I don't know how that would compare to a OpenVZ-VM, which only is shell-only, but I guess that with the same load I could run up to 10 OpenVZ-VMs.
I even had two OpenVZ-VMs running inside a KVM-VM without any trouble.

Personally I use VMs to test stuff. Usually different distributions or other OSs like BSD, Solaris or ReactOS. But I have also used it to test clustering.

Another possible application is a web-hosting-environment. Each domain is hosted on a different virtual server. Thus the domains are more separated from each other than it would be in a traditional shared hosting environment, thus more security.
Also, if one of the servers crashes for some reasons or does other funny stuff it's unlikely to affect the other domains, as they run on different VMs. More stability/reliability.
Finally, as the regular website is hardly a challenge for today's servers having several VMs running utilizes the server better, which results in a better use of IT-budget.

There are many reasons why virtualization is getting bigger and bigger these days, some of the reasons I have named above, whatever may apply to you is what you would like to do in a virtual environment.
 
Old 03-25-2009, 03:48 AM   #3
chownuseradd
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Reptiler, thank you very much for your informative answer. I agree with you in all of what you have said but the one thing that sticks to me is your mention of virtualization becoming bigger and bigger. That is the reason that I am switching my focus from other linux based projects to focus on understanding and utilizing virtual environments. In case anybody else reads this too, we also were looking at the possibility of using one server (although futile) using two or more virtualization environments to "load balance" itself. This of course is pointless as the resources are the same on the server throughout, but the brainstorming was fun! Thanks again!
 
Old 03-25-2009, 04:08 AM   #4
reptiler
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You're welcome.

Yes, virtualization is getting bigger. Recently there was a seminar on it, but sadly I registered too late and it was booked out already.

You say that it's pointless to setup a load-balancing solution in VMs on the same server. Well, although it may not be so useful in a production-environment it still is useful as a test-setup.
As said in my previous post, I used VMs to test clustering. Doesn't make much sense in a production-environment either, but is a good way t test around if you don't have two or more spare boxes standing around at home.
 
  


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