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Old 04-16-2012, 11:40 AM   #1
Roy Purba
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2 internet connections on 1 computer


Hi, how could I connect 2 internet connection in 1 computer "A" without cost much money. The computer "A" will be used as gateway.
Tx
 
Old 04-16-2012, 01:50 PM   #2
divyashree
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Hi Roy , welcome to LQ.

make the question little clear.

You want 2 internet on 1 computer( cost much money ) or 1 internet on 2 computer ( cost less money and 1 computer will be your gateway ).
 
Old 04-16-2012, 03:01 PM   #3
TroN-0074
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We are guessing here.
I am assuming Roy wants to connect one computer hard wired so he can broadcast wireless connection for a second or third device? kind of like turning a computer into router.

If that is the case I thing two wireless cards in the hard wired computer are needed. Or a combination of an internal Ethernet card and a USB wireless adapter.

Good luck to you.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 05:40 PM   #4
The Lightning Stalker
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I might recommend checking out the BrazilFW distro at http://brazilfw.com.br.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 07:46 PM   #5
padeen
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You don't need wireless, unless it is a laptop without a PCI-E bus. Two ethernet nic cards will do, cost $5.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 10:36 PM   #6
Roy Purba
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Thanks for your quick reply.
My problem is, some times I lived in a remote area that internet speed connection are very bad. The connection available are DSL, wireless (HSDPA n EVDO n EDGE). Nobody can not guarantee that HSDA or EVDO offer good speed to upload or download without disconnecting or many times click "TRY AGAIN" in firefox.
So, I want to combine this available internet connection on 1 computer to get a better speed and reliable connection. I worked on a laptop. Which linux distro should I use? I have linux mint and ubuntu software.
After this one is solved, the second task I want to share this connection to the people nearby so they can have the opportunity get in to internet (most of them are kids).
 
Old 04-17-2012, 12:01 AM   #7
aruntomar2001
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hi Roy,

The solution to your problem has existed for a very long time, but it's a little complex to setup for a normal user. To make everyone's life easy, we've started a opensource project called "IspUnity". With IspUnity, you can achieve whatever you've mentioned above. We are in the final stages of testing and releasing a ruby gem. if you are interested in the project, follow us on twitter @ispunity and the project is hosted on github: https://github.com/aruntomar/isp_unity .

A website dedicated to the project will be up shortly, the url is : www.ispunity.com

Regards,
Arun.
 
Old 04-17-2012, 04:13 PM   #8
kitgerrits
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Is you can afford it: get two links with Ethernet (cable and DSL) and get a multilink router like the Cisco RV042, Netgear FVS336G or Draytek Vigor 2920

If you're feeling lucky: Set up both connections on your Linux NAT-router and give the fastest connection(router) a higher priority(lower metric). I'm not sure how well Linux detects Dead Gateways, though.

The hard way: learn about Bandwidth Aggregation, especially PPP multilink:
http://www.vicomsoft.com/learning-ce...g-and-teaming/
http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/3149

Maybe take a look at:
http://www.stearns.org/tunnel/
 
Old 04-17-2012, 07:06 PM   #9
rrdonovan
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Hmmmm. OK, you need 2 NIC cards. Use one NIC for one provider, and the other for another provider. Once done, bridge them. This done, it should speed things up as it would get data from two providers rather than waiting on just one.

Master Rod
 
Old 04-18-2012, 12:34 AM   #10
Roy Purba
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrdonovan View Post
...need 2 NIC cards. Use one NIC for one provider, and the other for another provider. Once done, bridge them...

Master Rod
Sorry to ask,
1. how could I bridge them;
2. what kind of OS should use?
 
Old 04-18-2012, 05:56 AM   #11
greenleaf
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Interesting question, Roy.

Maybe if I tell you a little about a set-up that I use it might help. Basically I have a single ADSL "modem". Its quite a long way from the exchange, so the attenuation is high and there's a lot of noise (so SNR is not good). I can get about 1.7Mb/s down. However this is enough for a small office.

There are 2 workstations on the local area network together with an additional and rather ancient PC which runs various servers and acts as the gateway to the internet. Personally I find it better to have a gateway made up from a PC running linux together with a separate switch for the local area network than a combined router/modem box. There is one critical reason. Using a USB modem it is possible to reboot the modem from the PC when the modem has not lost synchronisation, but nevertheless is denied a route to the internet. Furthermore this can be done automatically via suitable shell scripts. It is of course important to have a firewall on the PC. For this I use iptables and fail2ban.

I have used a very similar arrangement, although much nearer the exchange, to support a group of about 6 office workers. It worked fine. These people were able to get simultaneous access to the internet, and we could even do secure transatlantic backups for databases over night. Nowadays this would be considered too slow for an office, and really you would probably want fibre connections for that. However if you want to support some children, by giving them access to the internet, it might still be suitable.

The technology to achieve all this is not obvious. I think it might help you to read up about TCP/IP, PPP and routing. The other things that should help are Network Address Translation and iptables. There are some pretty good explanations of TCP/IP and routing in "Running Linux" (O'Reilly). There are probably some good explanations on-line, too.

As for OS, I am actually running an ancient version of Red Hat extensively modified in order to keep it up to date. It may well be that some modern OSs provide everything you need, all on the distribution disks. However I download what I need and build it locally. One advantage of using an old PC is that it doesn't need much electrical power. In addition, there is no need for it to run X - you don't need the windows on the server.

If you want other ways of connecting to the internet, in addition to the ADSL, then you probably need knowledge of routing and acquisition of appropriate hardware interfaces. This might help if the ADSL proves to be unreliable. However if you can get a good connection, then that one connection may be all that you need.
 
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Old 04-20-2012, 03:11 PM   #12
rrdonovan
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Sorry to ask,
1. how could I bridge them;
2. what kind of OS should use?

You're kidding me right?! Look, install openSUSE Linux. once done, then look on how to bridge the two network cards. Use Yast to setup the nics. Once done, check the bridge forums.
 
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