LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-15-2009, 03:57 PM   #16
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 12,096

Rep: Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978

Wasn't what I asked for - fdisk works with (block) devices, not partitions (as it tried to tell you). Use the command I posted.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 04:01 PM   #17
dirk.digalow
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
Do you have flash drives plugged in? I've ran into a few problems in the past after I've rebooted with flash drives plugged in. If you do have flash drives plugged in, either lower their boot order below the HDDs or unplug them.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 04:13 PM   #18
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk.digalow View Post
Do you have flash drives plugged in? I've ran into a few problems in the past after I've rebooted with flash drives plugged in. If you do have flash drives plugged in, either lower their boot order below the HDDs or unplug them.
I unplugged everything but my cd/dvd drives, my main hard drive (the other one is a 20g that gets a bsod after a few minutes of running), and unplugged every usb device in there except my mouse and keyboard.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 04:15 PM   #19
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
Wasn't what I asked for - fdisk works with (block) devices, not partitions (as it tried to tell you). Use the command I posted.
Oh, alright, i thought you meant to 'fdisk -l' my hard drive.

I'll have to do that in a little bit though, I'm not at home right at the moment.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 04:46 PM   #20
PTrenholme
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
Distribution: Fedora, (K)Ubuntu
Posts: 4,147

Rep: Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330
This may not be your problem, but my laptop has a "retarded" BIOS that reads one of my drives as being UDMA/133 when, in fact (and when queried) it's only UDMA/100. As a result, GRUB cannot boot from that drive. (After booting from the other drive, the second drive throws up several errors 'till it gives up and resets the access to UDMA/100. Then it works fine.)

So, consider installing GRUB on, say, a memory stick with the kernel and initial RAM disk images on it and seeing if you can boot from it. Or, since you can boot from a CD, install GRUB and the boot files on a CD (or CDRW), and boot from it.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 04:52 PM   #21
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PTrenholme View Post
This may not be your problem, but my laptop has a "retarded" BIOS that reads one of my drives as being UDMA/133 when, in fact (and when queried) it's only UDMA/100. As a result, GRUB cannot boot from that drive. (After booting from the other drive, the second drive throws up several errors 'till it gives up and resets the access to UDMA/100. Then it works fine.)

So, consider installing GRUB on, say, a memory stick with the kernel and initial RAM disk images on it and seeing if you can boot from it. Or, since you can boot from a CD, install GRUB and the boot files on a CD (or CDRW), and boot from it.
That's sort of what I'm doing at the moment, just instead of using GRUB I'm using backtrack. I've never heard of GRUB before though, is it another version of linux?

When I do a kde copy to my ram, if i turn off my computer at any point I have to do it over again, I wasn't aware that I had a possibility of 'installing' to a stick of RAM, unless that's what you mean?
Right now, I've been booting off of the CD for about 10 months trying to get an operating system onto a hard drive so I can just use the cd as backup.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 06:00 PM   #22
PTrenholme
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
Distribution: Fedora, (K)Ubuntu
Posts: 4,147

Rep: Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330
GRUB (The "GRand Universal Bootloader) is one of several replacements for older, propitiatory, boot loaders such as the Windows NTLDR.

In order for an OS to be loaded, a small (512byte) program is installed on a hard drive in the first sector of the first cylinder of the hard drive, before the start of the first partition. This is called the "Master Boot Record" (MBR), and the program installed in you computers "mother board" in read-only memory called the "Basic Input/Output System" (BIOS) is automatically run every time you start your computer. That hard-wired program first checks your system by running a "Power On Self Test" (POST) that checks your computers memory and the devices connected to the mother board. When the POST finishes, it scans the hard drives (and other devices) connected to your system for any active MBRs in the order you specified when you configured the boot order in your BIOS. It then loads the MBRs into the computers "Random Access Memory" (RAM) and transfers control to that MBR program.

If it can not find any active MBR, it produces a message like "No OS found" and halts.

It was this small program and the few files it needs to run that I suggested you put in a RAM stick, not whole installation.

But your apparent lack of familiarity with the loading procedures prompts me to ask a simple question: Is it possible that you (or your vendor) has turned on a "boot virus protection" option in your BIOS? Those options protect the MBR on the hard drive by preventing any programs from writing to the MBR. If this kind of protection is active on your system, then you will never be able to boot from your hard drive because the essential bootstrap code will never be written to your drive.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 06:40 PM   #23
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PTrenholme View Post
GRUB (The "GRand Universal Bootloader) is one of several replacements for older, propitiatory, boot loaders such as the Windows NTLDR.

In order for an OS to be loaded, a small (512byte) program is installed on a hard drive in the first sector of the first cylinder of the hard drive, before the start of the first partition. This is called the "Master Boot Record" (MBR), and the program installed in you computers "mother board" in read-only memory called the "Basic Input/Output System" (BIOS) is automatically run every time you start your computer. That hard-wired program first checks your system by running a "Power On Self Test" (POST) that checks your computers memory and the devices connected to the mother board. When the POST finishes, it scans the hard drives (and other devices) connected to your system for any active MBRs in the order you specified when you configured the boot order in your BIOS. It then loads the MBRs into the computers "Random Access Memory" (RAM) and transfers control to that MBR program.

If it can not find any active MBR, it produces a message like "No OS found" and halts.

It was this small program and the few files it needs to run that I suggested you put in a RAM stick, not whole installation.

But your apparent lack of familiarity with the loading procedures prompts me to ask a simple question: Is it possible that you (or your vendor) has turned on a "boot virus protection" option in your BIOS? Those options protect the MBR on the hard drive by preventing any programs from writing to the MBR. If this kind of protection is active on your system, then you will never be able to boot from your hard drive because the essential bootstrap code will never be written to your drive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PTrenholme View Post
GRUB (The "GRand Universal Bootloader) is one of several replacements for older, propitiatory, boot loaders such as the Windows NTLDR.
Would you reccomend installing GRUB instead of trying to use what I have now, or should I just check to see whether or not I have a boot virus protection enabled?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PTrenholme View Post
Is it possible that you (or your vendor) has turned on a "boot virus protection" option in your BIOS? Those options protect the MBR on the hard drive by preventing any programs from writing to the MBR. If this kind of protection is active on your system, then you will never be able to boot from your hard drive because the essential bootstrap code will never be written to your drive.
I've been through every section of my BIOS many times in the last 10 months, read through everything, figured out whats what, what it does, etc, and I've never seen any form of a 'boot virus protection' option in there; So, unless it was previously activted before I recieved the computer (which it wasnt, because it worked up until 10 months ago), then I would have no idea if I'd accidentally turned it on without knowing what it was or not. But the most I've really messed with through the BIOS was my hard drive, and the boot order.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 07:12 PM   #24
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 11,042
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367Reputation: 1367
Hi,

Post the output of 'fdisk -l' from the cli as was requested. We can't diagnose if you don't provide the requested information.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 07:59 PM   #25
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,

Post the output of 'fdisk -l' from the cli as was requested. We can't diagnose if you don't provide the requested information.
I'll be home in about 40 mins, ill post it then.
sorry about the misreading, I was in a hurry, had to get to school.

Last edited by TechniSlave; 01-15-2009 at 09:34 PM.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 09:33 PM   #26
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
OneBuck: Here's the output:
Here's the output:

'fdisk -l

Disk /dev/hdd: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 155061 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes

__Device____Boot__Start__End___Blocks____Id__System
/dev/hdd1____*______3____409___204800____7___HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/hdd2__________409__155059_77943808__7__HPFS/NTFS
Partition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.'

Last edited by TechniSlave; 01-15-2009 at 10:26 PM.
 
Old 01-16-2009, 01:12 AM   #27
Didier Spaier
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Paris, France
Distribution: Slackware{,64}-14.1 on a Lenovo T61 6457-4XG
Posts: 4,015

Rep: Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962Reputation: 962
Well, Linux won't boot on a NTFS partition anyway.

Please download and burn a gparted live-cd and reformat your hard disk with it.
- Begin with erasing all partitions. This will let you with your whole disk as an empty space.
- Then make a first partition (which should be *bootable*) of around 13 G (filesystem Linux ext3),
- another one of 2G (filesystem Linux swap),
- and use the remaining space fot the third partition (filesystem Linux ext3).

Then you could try to install Slackware 12.2 -- I use this one but choose the one you prefer

At time of (trying to) install it use your partitions as follows :
- first partition for /
- second partition for swap
- third partition for /home

Hope it will work
 
Old 01-16-2009, 01:56 AM   #28
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Didier Spaier View Post
Well, Linux won't boot on a NTFS partition anyway.

Please download and burn a gparted live-cd and reformat your hard disk with it.
- Begin with erasing all partitions. This will let you with your whole disk as an empty space.
- Then make a first partition (which should be *bootable*) of around 13 G (filesystem Linux ext3),
- another one of 2G (filesystem Linux swap),
- and use the remaining space fot the third partition (filesystem Linux ext3).

Then you could try to install Slackware 12.2 -- I use this one but choose the one you prefer

At time of (trying to) install it use your partitions as follows :
- first partition for /
- second partition for swap
- third partition for /home

Hope it will work
Thats not even close to my problem. lol
I'll dual boot it after I even get an operating system to work on it. I've installed linux on this machine many times, but thanks for the help.
 
Old 01-16-2009, 01:58 AM   #29
TechniSlave
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 24

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Sorry, double posted.
 
Old 01-16-2009, 08:31 AM   #30
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 12,096

Rep: Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978Reputation: 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by TechniSlave View Post
Disk /dev/hdd: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 155061 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes
That can't be correct - an 80 Gig disk would have to be LBA (255 heads). Something has screwed the disk geometry, and so the cylinder count will be way too large.
Quote:
also, I dont think it's a hard drive problem, I think it's something to do with my system, because I've tried at least 5 - 6 different hard drives in it and I've gotten the same result from every one of them.
Now that's a worry.
No idea what to suggest - maybe a BIOS update ???.
 
  


Reply

Tags
found, help, installed, system


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
operating system not found bountyhunter Linux - Newbie 5 03-30-2007 03:34 PM
operating system not found plotty Linux - Software 4 01-19-2006 09:52 PM
Operating system not found domon#1 Linux - Hardware 20 07-01-2005 12:40 PM
Operating system not found juanbobo General 3 06-01-2005 01:46 PM
Operating System Not Found PaulSpn1 Linux - Newbie 4 07-22-2004 05:49 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:22 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration