LinuxQuestions.org
Visit the LQ Articles and Editorials section
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Networking
User Name
Password
Linux - Networking This forum is for any issue related to networks or networking.
Routing, network cards, OSI, etc. Anything is fair game.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 07-17-2007, 08:31 PM   #1
airman99
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 26

Rep: Reputation: 15
sshfs vs. shfs


Anybody had experience enough with shfs and/or sshfs to compare/contrast the two? I'm having difficulty with shfs and a 2.6.20 linux kernel, but sshfs doesn't deal with file permissions quite as seamlessly.

Just looking for opinions and likes/dislikes for the two.
 
Old 07-18-2007, 02:54 PM   #2
macemoneta
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Manalapan, NJ
Distribution: Fedora x86 and x86_64, Debian PPC and ARM, Android
Posts: 4,593
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 326Reputation: 326Reputation: 326Reputation: 326
I had some permission problems with sshfs until I added some options ("sshfs --help" for details):

Code:
sshfs -o follow_symlinks,reconnect,workaround=rename user@host: /some/directory/
 
Old 07-18-2007, 07:55 PM   #3
airman99
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 26

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by macemoneta
I had some permission problems with sshfs until I added some options ("sshfs --help" for details):

Code:
sshfs -o follow_symlinks,reconnect,workaround=rename user@host: /some/directory/
Does this solve the problem/feature that all users accessing a mounted share have mount-owner privileges on that share? In other words, if root mounts a volume with the allow_other option set, then any action that user bob takes on that mounted share will be with the privileges that root has. In other words, bob can now delete files on the mounted share that he normally would not be allowed to, just because the share was mounted by root originally.
 
Old 07-18-2007, 07:59 PM   #4
airman99
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 26

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by airman99
Does this solve the problem/feature that all users accessing a mounted share have mount-owner privileges on that share? In other words, if root mounts a volume with the allow_other option set, then any action that user bob takes on that mounted share will be with the privileges that root has. In other words, bob can now delete files on the mounted share that he normally would not be allowed to, just because the share was mounted by root originally.
Well, looks like the option default_permissions takes care of the above issue and causes the kernel to check permissions like what would occur on a local volume.

That's what happens when you sit down and actually read the documentation. :-)
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home networking with SSHFS? Umanga Linux - Networking 2 03-13-2007 01:03 AM
SSHFS Drawbacks jerril Linux - Software 5 11-26-2006 05:21 PM
Anyone using Slackware and SSHFS? JockVSJock Slackware 6 12-20-2005 05:22 AM
shared filesystem crap: shfs, sshfs, lufs, fuse whansard Linux - Networking 1 06-26-2005 07:58 PM
ssh/shfs question joleger Linux - General 1 01-17-2005 09:38 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:13 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration