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Old 02-26-2008, 01:35 PM   #1
Critcho
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Return MAC Address with Ping


How do I get the MAC address of my remote equipment? I have a Windows utility called Angry IP Scanner that pings all IPs in the range I give it (e.g. to avoid ipAddresses clashing on my LAN). Angry returns a stack of info about the remote, including
- Host Name
- Computer Name
- User currently logged in
- MAC Address

Is this program running Ping or something else? I can't seem to find any details on MAC in the man pages for PING.

In short, how do I determine the MAC of a remote device, running linux at both ends.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:53 PM   #2
acid_kewpie
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well angry ip runs on linux too, but that mac only comes from an arp request, it's nothing "interesting" really, and is only the information that you'll have in your local arp cache anyway. you won't get it if the scan is done on a non-local network as that data doesn't persist through a router.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 02:08 PM   #3
Critcho
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Thanks for your help acid_kewpie, looks like I'm SOL... My remote device is on the other end of a mobile network, so I am jumping through a VPN and several routers to get there.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 02:10 PM   #4
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if you're looking to manage these assets then you'd look to use a formal protocol like snmp to poll this sort of data in a civilized manner.
 
Old 11-02-2008, 03:50 PM   #5
Gadzila
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I'm search very much and don't find how to find MAC address of some external user...
 
Old 11-02-2008, 03:51 PM   #6
Gadzila
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And all network tools like Improved Network Tools say nothing about MAC address
 
Old 11-02-2008, 04:36 PM   #7
acid_kewpie
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so you didn't actually bother reading what i wrote here 8 months ago?
 
Old 11-03-2008, 01:05 AM   #8
Gadzila
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It's theme is actual for me now too.
 
Old 11-03-2008, 05:06 AM   #9
acid_kewpie
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Sorry, that makes no sense, and your question is *STILL* answered above.
 
Old 11-04-2008, 01:42 PM   #10
Gadzila
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You sure that MAC of external user are really unaccessible ?
 
Old 11-04-2008, 02:02 PM   #11
acid_kewpie
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well how about you give me a *good* reason for wanting it.
 
Old 11-05-2008, 02:38 AM   #12
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To describe my original reason for wanting to get the mac: We manufacture RTUs (Remote Telemetry Units), which we configure and test in shop before we send to the customer. A customer may get 5 RTUs and 5 cellular modems in a shipment. Each modem is in the RTU box that it belongs to, but the customer still has to install them, so they sometimes get shuffled.

The devices should connect automatically, they will be assigned a static IP address from the cellular network. Once it has connected, I can log in remotely and check if it is working OK. However, if RTU#1 has been given modem #2, when I telnet to the IP address of modem #1, the password for RTU#1 will not work. If I can get the mac of the remote, I can see what RTU is actually at that IP Address, then I can start work.

Nothing malicious, but I guess again the many suffer inconvieniences brought on by the evils of the few.
 
Old 11-05-2008, 03:57 PM   #13
rg.viza
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Critcho View Post
To describe my original reason for wanting to get the mac: We manufacture RTUs (Remote Telemetry Units), which we configure and test in shop before we send to the customer. A customer may get 5 RTUs and 5 cellular modems in a shipment. Each modem is in the RTU box that it belongs to, but the customer still has to install them, so they sometimes get shuffled.

The devices should connect automatically, they will be assigned a static IP address from the cellular network. Once it has connected, I can log in remotely and check if it is working OK. However, if RTU#1 has been given modem #2, when I telnet to the IP address of modem #1, the password for RTU#1 will not work. If I can get the mac of the remote, I can see what RTU is actually at that IP Address, then I can start work.

Nothing malicious, but I guess again the many suffer inconvieniences brought on by the evils of the few.
Writing this up in the OP may have saved you a lot of grief.

If you can telnet to something on the same subnet, you can

$ arping 127.34.24.12
Unicast reply from 127.34.24.12 [00:50:56:10:00:FD] 1.611ms

it if the OS running on the gear supports it. You could also ping it:

$ ping 127.34.24.12

from something you do have access to, then run

$ arp

to print out the arp cache:
Code:
Address                  HWtype  HWaddress           Flags Mask            Iface
127.34.24.1             ether   00:1A:A1:94:AD:41   C                     eth0
127.34.24.12            ether   00:50:56:10:00:FD   C                     eth0
127.34.24.13            ether   00:50:56:10:00:FE   C                     eth0
See the mac address is how wire level network addressing happens. The IP address is easier and more logical for humans to route, deal with and organize in a much more orderly fashion than could be done with MAC (considering how ethernet works and the intended use of the MAC).

TCP IP was created to allow routing between broadcast domains, as opposed to enlarging them (a la bridging)

Much like a sort of wire level DNS, ARP stores a IP to MAC mapping in the arp cache in the network gear and stations. Any time you connect to a device over the network, within your broadcast domain, (often your subnet) you add that remote device's MAC to your ARP cache (aka table). Once you've communicated you need only to look up the MAC in your local ARP cache to address non routed packets.

Unfortunately ARP is only maintained and available within the broadcast domain. Outside of that it's been routed and this is done with a TCP/IP (and rarely IPX) address encoded in the packet headers. The network gear at the other end sorts out the ARP and routes the packet appropriately once it reaches the destination broadcast domain. The client doesn't need to know or care about the destination MAC unless it's communicating directly with it and there are no routers involved.

This is why you can't get the remote ARP unless you communicate with a program (such as an snmpd) running on the PC(or device) that will give it to you, or with a device on the same subnet where you can get a shell.

An interesting misconception about MACs is that you can use them for security to ID a NIC. Unfortunately a lot of gear can change the MAC on the fly, so that's kind of useless as a security identifier. The fact that it's "hard" set and burned into the NIC is a little misleading.

-Viz
 
Old 11-06-2008, 03:06 AM   #14
acid_kewpie
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I would be looking at what is assigning those IP addresses, initially I'd assume DHCP reservations, but even if not there would be something presumably at MAC level involved in the assignment, and that in a log file would give you what you want.
 
Old 11-07-2008, 01:03 PM   #15
Gadzila
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Tnx a lot... it's real way to find IP of closest host...

root@:~# arping 177.22.160.1
ARPING 177.22.160.1 from 177.22.167.220 eth0
Unicast reply from 177.22.160.1 [000:88:04:9E:72] 9.605ms
 
  


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