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Old 10-24-2004, 04:48 PM   #1
Steve Cronje
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Unhappy NFS: a mounted to b, b mounted to c, c can't read a?


For some or other reason, this does not seem to work:

I mount a directory from machine a in the directory tree in machine b. I then mount a part of the directory tree that contains the mount from a in machine c.

Now, from machine c, I can see the directories for both machines a and b, but I cannot see the files in the directories of a. I have checked the permissions in all the directories (set them to 777), and made sure my exports allow exports to c from both a and b.

Is this a limitation of NFS, or do I need to fix something?

Thanks!
Steve

Last edited by Steve Cronje; 10-24-2004 at 04:54 PM.
 
Old 10-24-2004, 05:06 PM   #2
acid_kewpie
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it's part of NFS, you could be exporting all things all over the place if this was allowed. you can only export local data. this is a good thing. basically you need a better approach to sharing files on your network.
 
Old 10-24-2004, 05:15 PM   #3
Steve Cronje
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Quote:
Originally posted by acid_kewpie
it's part of NFS, you could be exporting all things all over the place if this was allowed. you can only export local data. this is a good thing. basically you need a better approach to sharing files on your network.
Thanks for the response.

What I am trying to do, is use several blocks of free space on the 5 different machines on my home network for sharing music, and other, files. I was hoping to make this transparent, in that all the shares are mounted to one directory which the other machines can then mount, making changes to the configuration only necessary on that one machine.

Of course, NOW, I see what you mean - that would create a cyclical system.

So, what approach would you suggest, or am I stuck with configuring each machine individually?

Thanks
Steve
 
Old 10-24-2004, 05:22 PM   #4
acid_kewpie
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well you have the slightly ropey option of placing a centrally editable script on a main nfs share. this contains a script to mount other shares whever the share is accessed from...
 
Old 10-24-2004, 05:25 PM   #5
Steve Cronje
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Quote:
Originally posted by acid_kewpie
well you have the slightly ropey option of placing a centrally editable script on a main nfs share. this contains a script to mount other shares whever the share is accessed from...
Yeah, probably quicker and cleaner to just edit the individual machines.

Thanks
Steve
 
Old 10-24-2004, 11:47 PM   #6
LinuxRam
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@Steve Cronje
NFS: a mounted to b, b mounted to c, c can't read a?

This is not allowed by nfs protocol, it doesn't allow u to export and exported files only local files can be exported.

Is there any specifice need to do that. Just mount everthing u want from m/c 'a' directly without mounting it to 'b' and from 'b' to 'c'.



-Akshat
 
Old 10-25-2004, 09:00 AM   #7
ugge
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A more extensive way would be to try and set up some distributed filesystem. Haven't looked any deeper into that though.
 
Old 10-25-2004, 09:34 AM   #8
Steve Cronje
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Quote:
Originally posted by akshatyadav
@Steve Cronje
NFS: a mounted to b, b mounted to c, c can't read a?

Is there any specifice need to do that.

-Akshat
Just convenience. If I have all the mounts in one central place, I do not have to edit the configuration of every machine every time something changes on the network. If you knew what a fiddler I am, you would understand!! ;-)

Steve
 
Old 10-25-2004, 09:39 AM   #9
Steve Cronje
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Quote:
Originally posted by ugge
A more extensive way would be to try and set up some distributed filesystem. Haven't looked any deeper into that though.
hmm ..
I guess that's really what I am trying to do, but without the effort! I haven't researched this at all myself, either. It may be overkill for me, though.

Thanks for the reply.

Steve
 
Old 10-25-2004, 09:51 AM   #10
Steve Cronje
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Quote:
Originally posted by Steve Cronje
hmm ..
I haven't researched this at all myself, either. It may be overkill for me, though.

Steve
Quoting myself here, I should become a politician ;-)

From the Coda manual:

Quote:
Coda is a distributed file system that supports disconnected operation. Your user files are kept remotely on Coda server(s) where you can access them using venus, the client-side software for Coda. When you are strongly connected to the network, and authenticated to the Coda server, your user behavior defines what files are cached locally on your client computer. Since your files are still kept on the server, you can access them from any number of physical computers anywhere in the world. Any distributed file system can give this level on functionality, but Coda takes the user experience many steps further.
Of course, I am trying to use all the odd GBs of disk space lying around on my home network, which is mainly static, other than for one laptop, so perhaps this won't work, either.

Steve

Last edited by Steve Cronje; 10-25-2004 at 09:54 AM.
 
  


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