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-   -   IP class question (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-networking-3/ip-class-question-248954/)

chadi 10-29-2004 08:18 PM

IP class question
 
I have a question (I'm a newbie).

What does it mean "class of IP's" or "class a, b, c, etc.".

How does it all work and if you can provide me a link to some sort of tutorial / explanation that would be great. Tried a Google search but I got strange results.

Tinkster 10-29-2004 08:46 PM

http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6265-5034563.html

Quite brief, if you have questions come back :)



Cheers,
Tink


P.S.: Moving this to networking, more suitable there.

chadi 10-29-2004 09:40 PM

Thank you :)

I'm class a :P (lol)

cetialphav 10-30-2004 01:19 PM

Note that most things nowadays use CIDR, Classless Inter-Domain Routing. This basically subdivides the address space into a finer granularity. It also means that the class notations are nearly meaningless.

I seriously doubt that you have a class A address. If you did, you wouldn't be here asking about it. There can only be 126 class A addresses and each one could support 16,777,214 hosts. I don't think you have that.

What you probably have is a class A address that has been split into lots of smaller pieces and you have one of those pieces. To put it another way, if your netmask is not 255.0.0.0, then you are not class A.

Tinkster 10-30-2004 01:23 PM

Quote:

Thank you :)

I'm class a :P (lol)
Just out of curiosity: what are you doing with
> 16 million IP addresses?


Cheers,
Tink

chadi 10-30-2004 01:33 PM

What do you mean?

I looked at the way the table shows your IP is in a class and mine
starts off with 67 and 69 for example. Isn't that class a?

Tinkster 10-30-2004 01:44 PM

Oh ... well, that's your ISP, then, not you ;)


Cheers,
Tink

ugge 10-31-2004 12:50 PM

Quote:

I seriously doubt that you have a class A address. If you did, you wouldn't be here asking about it. There can only be 126 class A addresses and each one could support 16,777,214 hosts. I don't think you have that.
classes of the IP space are defined by their first bits, not by their size. An IP like 15.243.45.23 is a Class A address regardless of the subnetting in effect. No organisation use a full Class A range without subnetting (exception 10.x.x.x), but their addresses are still Class A addresses.

chadl: You are right you are on a Class A IP, this is however split into sub networks, one which your ISP has bought and lets you use one of those addresses.


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