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Old 01-05-2008, 11:51 PM   #1
Cyberman
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How do I assign a static IP address to a DHCP server?


I recently installed dhcp3-server into Ubuntu Linux 7.10. I'm using the configuration and setup details I read here: Dapper DHCP_Server Despite the directions being for Dapper, they work.

I can get my client to be addressed an IP address, so that is good. The DHCP server seems to be assigning itself an IP address, and that is not what I want. I want to control what IP address the DHCP server assigns to itself.

How do I assign a static IP address to a DHCP server?
 
Old 01-06-2008, 12:15 AM   #2
jrtayloriv
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Is this what you're looking for?

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/ubunt...ic-ip-address/
 
Old 01-06-2008, 02:43 AM   #3
Cyberman
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That worked for a moment. I don't know what's going on actually.
Something in the background keeps overriding my static IP address.

I am going to discuss what I did after I viewed that website:

I made these alterations
Quote:
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.0.123
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.0.0
broadcast 192.168.0.255
gateway 192.168.0.1
I guess it doesn't seem so static, because it keeps changing to 192.168.0.102 or something else.

I tried reading about this, and it seems like other people are having the same problem:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=521154
http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-296880.html
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ub...er/010073.html

I guess this problem has persisted for many server administrators for four years?
I know that using dhclient in the terminal will give me this:

Quote:
DHCPAK from 192.168.0.123
bound to 192.168.0.102 -- renewal in 17370 seconds.

Last edited by Cyberman; 01-06-2008 at 02:48 AM.
 
Old 01-06-2008, 03:37 AM   #4
Cyberman
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I found the solution. As having used Linux for a good while, I didn't think that killing dhclient was totally required, because it is sometimes needed for various networking devices. Everything is a file, and often the problem is a file. An IP alias should be made, but it should be embedded and executed by dhclient.

Quote:
gksudo gedit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
I made it look like this:
Quote:
alias (
interface "eth0";
fixed-address 192.168.0.123
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
}
Quote:
$ sudo dhclient
Quote:
$ sudo ifconfig
A reading of the new ifconfig displays an IP alias for eth0, which is shown as eth0:0.

I didn't touch the lease part. At least, I won't play with unless I think the lease time will effect anything. I haven't waited around long enough to see if there are problems with the lease. But, the major problem has dissipated. I can ping the address.

This is more of a workaround, because the alias is static. I suspect simply killing, killing dhclient and gnome-network-manager would allow for one IP address for the network device.

Last edited by Cyberman; 01-06-2008 at 03:48 AM.
 
Old 01-06-2008, 03:52 AM   #5
Peter_APIIT
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What u mean by assigning static ip address to DHCP Server ?
Thanks for your explanation
 
Old 01-28-2010, 09:06 PM   #6
Cyberman
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I seem to be a first google hit.
And the thread has a lot of views.
I'm setting up a dhcp3-server and running into the same problems.

Anyway, my knowledge has grown.
What I meant by a static IP for the DHCP3-server was this..

Imagine you have computer 1 and computer 2.
Computer 2 is the computer connecting to the DHCP3-server (computer 1).
Computer 1 also has an SSH server.

However, if computer 1's IP address fluxuates considerably, it will become difficult to use computer 2 to access computer 1's ssh server, because computer 1's IP address would be changing unless there were a way to make it static.

I've thought of a different scheme:


Code:
workstation@computer:~$ cat /etc/dhcp3/dhcpd.conf
#
# Sample configuration file for ISC dhcpd for Debian
#
# $Id: dhcpd.conf,v 1.1.1.1 2002/05/21 00:07:44 peloy Exp $
#

# The ddns-updates-style parameter controls whether or not the server will
# attempt to do a DNS update when a lease is confirmed. We default to the
# behavior of the version 2 packages ('none', since DHCP v2 didn't
# have support for DDNS.)
ddns-update-style none;

# option definitions common to all supported networks...
option domain-name "example.org";
option domain-name-servers ns1.example.org, ns2.example.org;

#####################################
default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;


subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
option domain-name-servers 192.168.0.1;
option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
option routers 192.168.0.1;
range 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.254;
}
###############################


# If this DHCP server is the official DHCP server for the local
# network, the authoritative directive should be uncommented.
authoritative;

# Use this to send dhcp log messages to a different log file (you also
# have to hack syslog.conf to complete the redirection).
log-facility local7;

# No service will be given on this subnet, but declaring it helps the 
# DHCP server to understand the network topology.

#subnet 10.152.187.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
#}

# This is a very basic subnet declaration.

#subnet 10.254.239.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
#  range 10.254.239.10 10.254.239.20;
#  option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org, rtr-239-0-2.example.org;
#}

# This declaration allows BOOTP clients to get dynamic addresses,
# which we don't really recommend.

#subnet 10.254.239.32 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
#  range dynamic-bootp 10.254.239.40 10.254.239.60;
#  option broadcast-address 10.254.239.31;
#  option routers rtr-239-32-1.example.org;
#}

# A slightly different configuration for an internal subnet.
#subnet 10.5.5.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
#  range 10.5.5.26 10.5.5.30;
#  option domain-name-servers ns1.internal.example.org;
#  option domain-name "internal.example.org";
#  option routers 10.5.5.1;
#  option broadcast-address 10.5.5.31;
#  default-lease-time 600;
#  max-lease-time 7200;
#}

# Hosts which require special configuration options can be listed in
# host statements.   If no address is specified, the address will be
# allocated dynamically (if possible), but the host-specific information
# will still come from the host declaration.

#host passacaglia {
#  hardware ethernet 0:0:c0:5d:bd:95;
#  filename "vmunix.passacaglia";
#  server-name "toccata.fugue.com";
#}

# Fixed IP addresses can also be specified for hosts.   These addresses
# should not also be listed as being available for dynamic assignment.
# Hosts for which fixed IP addresses have been specified can boot using
# BOOTP or DHCP.   Hosts for which no fixed address is specified can only
# be booted with DHCP, unless there is an address range on the subnet
# to which a BOOTP client is connected which has the dynamic-bootp flag
# set.
#host fantasia {
#  hardware ethernet 08:00:07:26:c0:a5;
#  fixed-address fantasia.fugue.com;
#}

# You can declare a class of clients and then do address allocation
# based on that.   The example below shows a case where all clients
# in a certain class get addresses on the 10.17.224/24 subnet, and all
# other clients get addresses on the 10.0.29/24 subnet.

#class "foo" {
#  match if substring (option vendor-class-identifier, 0, 4) = "SUNW";
#}

#shared-network 224-29 {
#  subnet 10.17.224.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
#    option routers rtr-224.example.org;
#  }
#  subnet 10.0.29.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
#    option routers rtr-29.example.org;
#  }
#  pool {
#    allow members of "foo";
#    range 10.17.224.10 10.17.224.250;
#  }
#  pool {
#    deny members of "foo";
#    range 10.0.29.10 10.0.29.230;
#  }
#}
Code:
~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
#iface eth0 inet dhcp

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.0.111
netmask 255.255.255.0
If you have firestarter, then setup the LAN permissions and other things.
Then restart the server.

*moves to other computer*

$ dhclient eth0
*waits*
$ ssh user@192.168.0.111
*watches things happen; ssh then works*

***** NOTE: Modifications may make this better. I am unsure as to whether or not an IP conflict will occur down the road.

Also, this might not even hold water after a while. It seems that if I constantly play with the ethernet card, then the server seems to change the cards IP address. That's annoying, and I don't fully understand it. However, a good reboot tends to bring things back to normal, because the IP address becomes what is listed in /etc/network/interfaces... Still.. I'm thinking there may be alternative methods to this.

Last edited by Cyberman; 01-28-2010 at 10:01 PM.
 
Old 01-29-2010, 03:47 PM   #7
jenaniston
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got ifconfig ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter_APIIT View Post
. . . assigning static ip address to DHCP Server
If I understand the question right . . . just try ifconfig . . .
First, run it to see what the server was assigned as IP, if any . . .
Code:
# ifconfig eth0
then to assign it - terminal command something like . . .
Code:
# ifconfig eth0 inet 192.168.0.111 netmask 255.255.255.0
(you can add broadcast address, but with netmask given ifconfig will determine the correct broadcast address).

Check again to see what is assigned.

I need to do this with the dhcp 4.1 server in Fedora 12 KDE . . .
there are better ways I'm sure, but this gets me going with the dhcpd daemon.

Good luck.
 
  


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