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-   -   Bind9 to serve my MX and A DNS records? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-networking-3/bind9-to-serve-my-mx-and-a-dns-records-512416/)

mikecrowe 12-20-2006 09:21 PM

Bind9 to serve my MX and A DNS records?
 
Hi folks,

This may be a stupid question, but here goes:

Situation:
1) I purchased a site at misk.com for $8. Cheap
2) I just found that to edit my DNS records to point MX (for mail) to the server I am running (Gentoo, etc.), I have to upgrade to the $37 package.
3) I am redirecting the nameservers to mydomain.com (which allows advanced DNS management for free), so I will be solving my problem.
4) I have my DNS records stored at various services (misk, godaddy, and now mydomain). I'd love to consolidate...
5) I'm running Bind9 now as an internal caching nameserver. I am not allowing external DNS requests inside firewall yet.
6) These are all personal sites -- only serving low volume web traffic and email.

OK, so here's my questions:
1) Rather than registering at Misk, setting nameservers to Mydomain, and then entering the advanced DNS records, is there a way to use my existing Bind9 installation to do this?
2) I do *not* want to run an general DNS service. I only want to host the NameServer for the domains I own.
3) If so, what's the downside? Traffic?

Please help me understand this. If this is just a matter of configuring bind and opening port 53, why shouldn't I try this?

TIA
Mike

chort 12-20-2006 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikecrowe
OK, so here's my questions:
1) Rather than registering at Misk, setting nameservers to Mydomain, and then entering the advanced DNS records, is there a way to use my existing Bind9 installation to do this?

No. The only way to host DNS for your sites is to register the domain and setup the DNS servers for your domain to point at your own IP (or another service's IPs that will allow you to edit your DNS).

Quote:

2) I do *not* want to run an general DNS service. I only want to host the NameServer for the domains I own.
Make sure you disable recursion for queries coming from the Internet. Then outside clients can only get answers about your own domains and your servers won't lookup other unrelated information.

Quote:

3) If so, what's the downside? Traffic?
The traffic is very negligable. The only real downside is the amount of time it takes you to learn about DNS, try to configure it, get it wrong, figure out what you got wrong, correct it, screw something else up, fix that, etc, etc. DNS is very complicated, especially with BIND. Don't expect to get things up and running in an hour or two.

mikecrowe 12-21-2006 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chort
No. The only way to host DNS for your sites is to register the domain and setup the DNS servers for your domain to point at your own IP (or another service's IPs that will allow you to edit your DNS).

I think I asked the question wrong. Below, you are indicating that Bind9 can be a nameserver for my domain. I think my problem is I know what I want to do, but I can't express it correctly. See below.

Quote:

Originally Posted by chort
Make sure you disable recursion for queries coming from the Internet. Then outside clients can only get answers about your own domains and your servers won't lookup other unrelated information.

OK, I don't want to ask you how to do this, but I need help in how to google for a howto in doing this. As I see it, I need to:

1) Instruct Bind9 to respond to the internet (open firewall, etc. as well)
2) Instruct Bind9 to not be a DNS server, but just a nameserver (?)
3) If I disable recursion, then it will not respond to other domains?

Can you give me some clues in what search terms to use to find this? I thought this would be easy to find, but it isn't. I think I have been searching for "Howto host DNS personal web sites" or something like that. Maybe change DNS to NameServer? What are the good keywords related to how to search for this?

Thanks, chort!

chort 12-21-2006 11:11 AM

DNS server and nameserver are the same thing.

DNS servers perform two functions: a) the answer questions about zones that they know about "authoritatively", i.e. they tell you whether or not a particular record exists in a zone that they have configured and b) they go lookup answers from other DNS servers for you, when they don't know the answer themself (that is called a recursive query.

When you configure your machine to have a specific IP address, gateway, DNS servers, etc that setting is what recursive DNS server your machine is going to use to lookup answers. When you look in a whois record and see what DNS servers are listed, those are authoritative servers for that zone. One server can perform both functions.

What you don't want is external clients on the Internet to be able to use your DNS server to lookup any name on the Internet. You only want your DNS server to give answers about your zone to external clients. To internal clients you want your server to be able to recursively lookup any name.


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