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Old 07-17-2014, 03:54 AM   #1
littlejoe5
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I installed mint17 OEM 64bit, Now and then the screren goes blank


All programs, icons, and windows are hidden. Nothing I have tried will work to set it straight, or turn it off, or reboot. Ctrl+Alt+f1; Ctrl+Alt+Del; Ctrl+Alt+Backspace; Ctrl+C. Have to shut it off by holding the off switch on the computer til it dies.

The screen doesn't go black or blue. It is mostly white, with an orderly pattern of squigly lines that are repeated across the whole screen. This is on a HP Pavilon a6110a with 6GB of memory. AMD64, dual processor, NVIDIA Graphix.

I tried to lighten it up by installing openbox as a WM, But only succeeded in leaving myself without menus, and having to study for awhile to get back my Mata desktop.

Where can I go from here.
 
Old 07-17-2014, 04:02 AM   #2
kestrel7777
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I would try booting up with a live cd of Knoppix. If it works in Knoppix I'd look to see what video driver Knoppix is using. Maybe just installing the Nvidia driver would fix it.
HTH.
 
Old 07-17-2014, 08:28 AM   #3
yancek
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On Mint Mate, go to the Menu, mouse up to Control Center and in the new window select Driver Manager. It should eventually open with several options and one that is recommended. Had a similar problem with it on my HP w/nvidia card. This should fix it.
 
Old 07-22-2014, 04:44 PM   #4
Timmi
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Why the OEM version? OEM is for Original Equipment Manufacturers, in order for them to bundle their OWN drivers for their hardware.
If I were you, I would start over, using the standard issue of Mint, in order to benefit from all the hardware drivers, etc. (codecs too). It should make for a much more pleasant works-out-of-the-box experience.
 
Old 07-22-2014, 06:10 PM   #5
littlejoe5
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Thanks Tmmmi. I went with OEM because I reasoned that it would likely have the needed drivers for my old system. Probably faulty reasoning, But it worked out beautifully. I had tried mint 14, 15, and 16, and they were so much trouble that I couldn't get them booted, or couldn't get them to stay up long enough to figure out what was wrong, (probably becauser all of my machines are outdated.) so I was stuck on 13. I like mint 13, but I wanted to upgrade. 17-OEM started fine, but then would go blank after using it a little. But at least it worked well enough find out why it wasn't working, and fix it. Now it's just great. (Of course I had to install another user.

I'm getting to the place where I don't really want everything to "work out of the box". I'd like for it to work well out of the box as a basic machine with a basic Gui that works. But beyond that... For instance nearly all of the Debian derivatives are loaded with Thunderbird for email. I never use Thunderbird. Banshee for media, I have been using it often, but there are some I like better.

But (as your signature suggests) Mint does train us to higher expectations.
 
Old 07-23-2014, 03:37 AM   #6
Timmi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by littlejoe5 View Post
Thanks Tmmmi. I went with OEM because I reasoned that it would likely have the needed drivers for my old system. Probably faulty reasoning, But it worked out beautifully. I had tried mint 14, 15, and 16, and they were so much trouble that I couldn't get them booted, or couldn't get them to stay up long enough to figure out what was wrong, (probably becauser all of my machines are outdated.) so I was stuck on 13. I like mint 13, but I wanted to upgrade. 17-OEM started fine, but then would go blank after using it a little. But at least it worked well enough find out why it wasn't working, and fix it. Now it's just great. (Of course I had to install another user.
I'm getting to the place where I don't really want everything to "work out of the box". I'd like for it to work well out of the box as a basic machine with a basic Gui that works. But beyond that... For instance nearly all of the Debian derivatives are loaded with Thunderbird for email. I never use Thunderbird. Banshee for media, I have been using it often, but there are some I like better.
But (as your signature suggests) Mint does train us to higher expectations.
I'm glad to hear that everything worked out for you. But like I said, everyone: STAY AWAY FROM OEM - that is for computer manufacturers to add their own drivers - not for the rest of us - unless we are writing our own drivers, or really know what we are doing and know exactly what drivers to add ourselves manually.

Sometimes, with these old systems, you might have a card in there, that has an IRQ conflict with something else... something gets actuated and all of a sudden you have two hardware components fighting for the same clock cycles and the system freezes - when that happens, it's on the ground floor - the physical layer that sits below everything else - all else, drivers, OS, everything sit on top of that... if your foundation is faulty, you need to fix the foundation because no software can move dip switches or jumpers for you. Just as an example, if you have a networking card, and a modem card, or a serial ports card, you should pull one of them, because they all use IRQ 3 and 4 - some old networking cards could use other IRQs, but they would still be set to IRQ3 by default. Old "multifunction" cards had even more conflicts (some like Boca brought that to a new level). And disabling it in the BIOS doesn't do the trick - you actually have to get your hands dirty (literally - or, dusty, if you prefer).

OK, this may not have been your problem (because I obviously lack information), but it may be someone else's problem who is reading the thread, so knows who the extra info might help, so please don't hit me if I'm out in left field.

But back to you: I remember reading something about one of the Environments of Mint - I believe it was Cinammon - that is more cutting edge, so keep that in mind if perfected is higher on the priority list than perfectible. If you want stuff to work and you might like to stay away from cutting edge (we used to say "bleeding edge" intead of cutting edge LOL - although I wouldn't say that about Mint because I hold it in high esteem) - especially cutting edge on old hardware. Oh yeah, and stay away from OEM too! ;-p

Last edited by Timmi; 07-23-2014 at 03:49 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2014, 11:17 AM   #7
Soadyheid
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I'm sure I read in the release notes for Mint 17 that the neuveau drivers supplied, which appear to work fine, will occasionally freeze or do weird things when using NVidea graphics. The solution apparently is to use the proprietary drivers.

I had this exact problem and using the Proprietary drivers cured it.

Play Bonny!

 
Old 07-24-2014, 05:52 PM   #8
Timmi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soadyheid View Post
I'm sure I read in the release notes for Mint 17 that the nouveau drivers supplied, which appear to work fine, will occasionally freeze or do weird things when using NVidea graphics. The solution apparently is to use the proprietary drivers. I had this exact problem and using the Proprietary drivers cured it.

ahh yes, the infamous nvidia! But video aren't the only drivers that are needed... I suspect that any enhanced performance drivers that a re hardware-specific would be left out on an OEM edition, awaiting the ones written by the hardware manufacturer. as for me, I stay away from OEM, and only swap a video driver if I have to, but still nevertheless install standard, not oem.
 
  


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