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-   -   USB Boot Hang (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-laptop-and-netbook-25/usb-boot-hang-4175441377/)

EmptyGroceryBag 12-13-2012 09:12 PM

USB Boot Hang
 
Hello,

I'm trying to install Slax on my Gateway LT4004. However, I'm running into a big problem. Whenever I try to boot from the USB stick, a black screen shows up with the following text:

"SYSLINUX 4.06 EDD 2012-10-32 Copyright (C) 1994-2012 H Peter Anvin et al"

Under that, a blinking cursor appears as if it's waiting for input, but the keyboard doesn't work. I've tried multiple ditros and apps to make the USB stick bootable but no success.

I tried it on my desktop to verify that my USB stick wasn't broken, and it worked. I assume it's something with either my netbook or the USB ports.

I've successfully installed a linux distro on my netbook for the same USB stick in the past, so I don't know what's up here...

Thanks!

malekmustaq 12-13-2012 11:01 PM

Quote:

I've successfully installed a linux distro on my netbook for the same USB stick in the past, so I don't know what's up here...
Indeed, mostly there should be no problem. But your report suggests that it is only an "X" related problem. So while in that state zap X first
Quote:

Ctl+Alt+Backspace
then try to reach into a shell, Ctl+Alt+F2-6 login as root then run
Quote:

~# X -configure
then
Quote:

~# startx
see if it solves.

You may also force the X to use /etc/X11/xorg.conf, there should be a vesa copy in their then you may configure the "Input" and Screen values, by first booting it into run level 1 or 3. Use the SEARCHER inside LinuxQuestions there are plenty of threads concerning xorg.conf and how to control X by manipulating that file.


Good luck.

TobiSGD 12-14-2012 04:36 AM

This can't be an X related problem, since the problem occurs when the bootloader starts.
I would recommend to zero out the USB device with dd and try it again.

malekmustaq 12-14-2012 06:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TobiSGD (Post 4849128)
This can't be an X related problem, since the problem occurs when the bootloader starts.
I would recommend to zero out the USB device with dd and try it again.

Indeed, Tobi is right, the problem cannot be zeroed out to X, there is also a big chance in the aspect of kernel module.

I stand corrected.

TobiSGD 12-14-2012 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by malekmustaq (Post 4849191)
there is also a big chance in the aspect of kernel module.

Also no. In this stage of the boot process the kernel isn't even loaded. There seems to be a problem with the bootloader itself, which may be caused by remnant data on the ck, which is why I recommended to totally delete any data on it with zeroing it out.

malekmustaq 12-14-2012 07:22 AM

Yea that could be one.

But my diagnosis brings me up to the X though because of this:

Quote:

Under that, a blinking cursor appears as if it's waiting for input, but the keyboard doesn't work.


So far, the appearance of blinking cursor indicates to me /dev/mouse node already exists or that rc.gpt has already loaded. Yet, contrary to this, we all know that modern UEFI/Bios from that point, runs mouse :D already! Well, my imaginations...

I can only hope the OP shall overcome that obstacle.

TobiSGD 12-14-2012 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by malekmustaq (Post 4849205)
Yea that could be one.

But my diagnosis brings me up to the X though because of this:



So far, the appearance of blinking cursor indicates to me /dev/mouse node already exists or that rc.gpt has already loaded. Yet, contrary to this, we all know that modern UEFI/Bios from that point, runs mouse :D already! Well, my imaginations...

I can only hope the OP shall overcome that obstacle.

You ever realized that you can choose different options and even edit the kernel parameters in your bootloader? That is also before a kernel or any X interface is loaded (it is the purpose of the bootloader to load the kernel you have chosen) and works even on old 386 computers, so that has nothing to do with modern firmware. Displaying text is in fact an ancient capability of the BIOS. The OS that is running at this stage to make the cursor blinking is the BIOS.

So it is technically impossible that the kernel or X are involved at all in this stage of the boot.

EmptyGroceryBag 12-14-2012 08:27 AM

So I haven't even gotten passed the BIOS yet? *faicpalm*

Quote:

There seems to be a problem with the bootloader itself
There's nothing wrong with the bootloader. Remember, I wrote in my first post that it works on my desktop.

Shadow_7 12-14-2012 12:21 PM

That doesn't mean that there's nothing wrong with it. Remember to use UUID's when moving around like this. Even update-grub can grab /dev/ names where UUID's should be used. SYSLINUX is the bootloader, if that's the last thing you see, then you're not likely past the boot loader. Check the configuration file(s). Use blkid to get the UUID and use it. I've also ran into grub issues where --set <UUID> was used instead of --set=root <UUID>. The later works, the former does NOT.

And of course make sure /etc/fstab also uses the UUID. It might load as /dev/sdg on one machine and /dev/sdc on another. That happens to me on my desktop (mixed IDE and SATA drives) as it doesn't always chose the same primary drive each power up. Alternatively try lilo and grub2 to boot your usb. Command line mode grub2 ftw.

grub> insmod ohci
grub> insmod uhci
grub> insmod usb
grub> ls

grub> insmod part_msdos
grub> insmod ext2
grub> configfile (???,???)/boot/grub/grub.cfg

Obviously you will either use ohci or uhci, but not both. But insmod'ing both in grub does no harm afaik. It's just extra keystrokes if you actually know which applies. Where (???,???) is what looks like the device and partition for the linux that you're trying to boot. Where grub.cfg is correct (UUIDs again). Otherwise you have to use the other way.

grub> insmod ohci
grub> insmod uhci
grub> insmod usb
grub> ls

grub> insmod part_msdos
grub> insmod ext2
grub> search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ????????????
grub> linux (???,???)/vmlinuz root=UUID=??????????? ro
grub> initrd (???,???)/initrd.img
grub> boot

This is for grub2 booting of a usb device. In my case it was (usb0a,msdos2) or something like that. I've never been able to boot usb with grub-legacy. I've gotten lilo to boot memtest and syslinux to boot memtest and that's about it. For my grub.cfg in relation to booting my usb stick(s) from my desktops bootloader. The entry looks something like this:

menuentry 'USB boot uhg uhg' --class debian --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os {
insmod uhci
insmod ohci
insmod usb
insmod part_msdos
insmod ext2
### set root='(hd0,msdos2)'
search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 12345678-1234-5678-1234-12345678abcd
echo 'Loading linux...'
linux /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-5-686 root=UUID=12345678-1234-5678-1234-12345678abcd ro
echo 'Loading initrd...'
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-5-686
}

Initially I used a plop boot manager CD to boot my usb drive. Because my laptop is so old it doesn't even support booting from USB. It was by far the simpler option for that initial, never done this before, boot up.

At least with grub you get bumped to a command line interface when the configuration is at fault. Mildly better than just a blinking cursor.

EmptyGroceryBag 12-14-2012 02:25 PM

Sorry, but I'm a noob at Linux, so I have so idea what those commands mean. Could you please tell me how I can install grub from Windows?

Shadow_7 12-14-2012 05:16 PM

Create an el_torito image of grub and burn it to an optical disk. Or use syslinux to boot that iso from a usb stick. From linux you can actually create a custom grub image with customized menu and other stuff. But I haven't explored that option myself as I'm fairly comfortable with the grub command line and syntax now (not that I wanted to be).

http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/

http://wiki.osdev.org/GRUB_2

It looks like you might need linux to create the eltorito image. I'm not quite sure why there isn't a downloadable prebuilt iso. Probably that moving target development thing again. But it's easy to make (in linux).

# apt-get install xorriso
$ grub-mkrescue -o grub-eltorito.iso

There's plenty of live CD/DVD versions of linux which enables you to do that. Which could also be booted with the syslinux + .iso method.

http://www.syslinux.org/wiki/index.php/HowTos
http://www.syslinux.org/wiki/index.php/SYSLINUX

My syslinux experience is limited to this page that worked for me.

http://forum.canardpc.com/threads/28...t-on-USB-Drive

But I saw another one that expanded this to use multiple iso images (linux liveDVD/CDs) with a menu. Since it can be installed and used from windows and exists on a FAT32 partition, I don't see why you couldn't set it all up in windows. From back when I was over thinking flash drives. It's just another storage device for all practical applications.


That plop thing I mentioned earlier.

http://www.plop.at/en/home.html

EmptyGroceryBag 12-15-2012 10:11 AM

Ok, I tried a different utility that used GRUB4DOS to put the iso on the stick. I boot from the stick, and I'm presented with a menu. When I go to install... what ever distro it was (I've trid many at this point) it just looped right back to the boot menu.

So, I thought, the only solution I could think of was to download an Ubuntu ISO and install ubuntu using the Wubi installer that came with the it. It turns out that it's designed to chainload GRUB from the Windows 7 bootloader. To my dismay, whenever I boot from GRUB, it hangs at the console, with no keyboard intput capabilities.

I'm starting to think, at this point, that there's some kind of confiction with the Windows bootloader.

Shadow_7 12-15-2012 11:52 AM

If you already have a running linux you can chroot an install of linux to another partition / device. That's how I setup my current system.

http://www.debian.org/releases/stabl...apds03.html.en

The above guide is by no means comprohensive, but it does contain enough of the process to get a bootable version of linux. Which will allow you to use the package manager and other distro tools to finish the process after you've booted an install done this particular way. It does lack the administrative step of setting a root password, which if you don't set that, you might have difficulty doing anything useful with the system after it's booted.

# passwd root

You can always chroot back into it later and set one. And in my case I did almost all of the install in this chroot environment. Up to the point of testing an X configuration, which is not advisable from the chroot. Mostly because the base system is likely too old and too different.


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