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-   -   Compiling in ACPI support on Compaq 2135CA (system crashes while compiling) (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-laptop-and-netbook-25/compiling-in-acpi-support-on-compaq-2135ca-system-crashes-while-compiling-206700/)

Dag 07-18-2004 05:47 PM

Compiling in ACPI support on Compaq 2135CA (system crashes while compiling)
 
Hey everyone.
Hopefully I've put this in the right place. Anyway, I'm trying to recompile my kernel for ACPI support on my Compaq Presario 2135CA laptop. I'm basically following this tutorial. Here's what I'm doing:

Code:

$ su root
Password:
# cd /usr/src/linux
# make mrproper
(Output -- looks normal)
# make xconfig
(Output -- looks normal.  Window pops up and I configure ACPI, hit save, close, go back to prompt)
# make dep && make clean && make bzImage && make modules
** Warning: make dep is no longer required

Then it begins compiling things. Everything looks normal, but at some point the system just shuts down inexplicably. Completely crashes. I reboot and it does a disk check and everything seems fine, but obviously that doesn't really help me get it installed. =/

Any help is much appreciated.

rovitotv 07-18-2004 07:04 PM

Answer you are not going to like
 
Have you tried compiling a very simple kernel? Try a compile for a kernel with out ACPI. If I understand your symptoms your problem maybe a bad memory chip. When I using LFS (Linux From Scratch) everything had to be compiled and if your system could not perform a kernel compile then the usual culprit was a bad memory chip. I could be way out of line here, this is just a WAG. If you have added memory to the system remove the extra memory chip and try a compile to see if it works. Good luck!

Dag 07-19-2004 12:42 AM

Couldn't get it to compile that either =/

I haven't added any memory to the system and I've never noticed problems with it before...

rovitotv 07-19-2004 12:54 PM

Test the memory
 
Just for fun I would download a memory tester from somewhere and make sure the memory is OK. It is possible to have a perfectly working machine with no problems but fails to compile a kernel usually this is attributed to bad memory or cache. The largest symptom of a hardware problem is the kernel failing to compile at random locations. Pay attention to where the kernel compile fails, if it fails at different locations I bet it is a memory problem. Could be a cache problem maybe. Good luck.


Below is a quote from the Linux Kernel Howto (http://www.lugor.org/sig/newbie/Kern...l-HOWTO-7.html)

"If it does not compile, then it is likely that a patch failed, or your source is somehow corrupt. Your version of gcc also might not be correct, or could also be corrupt (for example, the include files might be in error). Make sure that the symbolic links which Linus describes in the README are set up correctly. In general, if a standard kernel does not compile, something is seriously wrong with the system, and reinstallation of certain tools is probably necessary.


In some cases, gcc can crash due to hardware problems. The error message will be something like ``xxx exited with signal 15'' and it will generally look very mysterious. I probably would not mention this, except that it happened to me once - I had some bad cache memory, and the compiler would occasionally barf at random. Try reinstalling gcc first if you experience problems. You should only get suspicious if your kernel compiles fine with external cache turned off, a reduced amount of RAM, etc.


It tends to disturb people when it's suggested that their hardware has problems. Well, I'm not making this up. There is an FAQ for it -- it's at http://www.bitwizard.nl/sig11/. "

Dag 07-21-2004 02:37 AM

I ran memtest86 and it didn't find any errors. Perhaps the problem is that 64MB of my 246MB RAM is shared with the graphics card - perhaps GCC/Linux doesn't like that?

I guess I'll try reinstalling GCC or the soruce files.

I really don't understand how those could be corrupt though. o_O I haven't modified them at all since install...

rovitotv 07-21-2004 05:35 PM

Disable Cache
 
Have you tried disabling your cache ram inside your bios? Did you notice if the compile stops in different spots during the kernel compile?

Dag 07-21-2004 10:15 PM

I haven't tried disabling cahce RAM - I'll have to google on what that does and why it might help first... Oh, and yeah, it does stop in different spots. Sorry I didn't mention that.

Dag 07-25-2004 12:39 AM

Sorry for the double-post but I had to bump the thread.

Anyway, I went into the BIOS configuration utility and couldn't find anything about cache RAM - however, going on my theory about video memory, I changed the video memory allocation from "Auto" to 8MB. I went back into Linux and started again, and this time it all compiled fine. I enabled ACPI support through the Mandrake configuration utility as well.

I rebooted and noticed that three new boot images, 236-7, 236-7sec and 236-7[something, I forgot what x.x] appeared in the LILO menu. I chose 236-7 and got a black screen that didn't go anyway. So, I did a hard reboot and went to linux-secure which is the image I'd been using. It started loading and appeared to be loading ACPI, but when it got to "spurrious IRQ7 interrupt: [some letters/numbers]" it hung and stubbornly refused to do anything. I rebooted again and went through each of the Linux images (now 7 in total for some reason - linux, linux-secure, linux-nofb, failsafe, and the other three new ones) and got either the black screen or the hang at boot.

I put the Mandrake 10 install/rescue disc in, mounted dev/hda2 (Linux partition, obviously), chrooted to /mnt and looked around in etc/lilo.conf - nothing looked out of the ordinary. I went to /boot and opened config with viM, changing all the "y"s related to ACPI and to "m"s - I rebooted again and it did the exact same thing.

So, I have no idea where to go from here ~_~ I just hope this doesn't mean I'm going to have to reinstall Linux again.

zLinuxz 07-25-2004 03:50 AM

hehe...what else can be said.....Compaq's suck big time!? Compaq+Linux=Water+Oil
your hardware simply isn't compatible enough with linux....blame Compaq.

Dag 07-25-2004 04:36 AM

Linux is compatible with anything, it's just a matter of how much blood, sweat and tears it's going to take to get it to work XD Realistically, though, I don't think this should be too much of a problem. But what do I know?

zLinuxz 07-25-2004 10:59 AM

obviously Linux is compatible with anything, but not anything is compatible with Linux...for this is not a multidirectional implicative statement, it is only unidirectional.
And the reason why hardware may not work under Linux is because there are no drivers available for Linux, because manufacturers refuse to make them and distribute them...like I said Compaq sucks for choosing hardware that is like that....and Compaq and most of American computer manufacturers suck big time for purchasing builtin video cards, sound vards, network devices....because those are the by far the least likely pieces of hardware that are ever going to have Linux drivers....

rovitotv 07-25-2004 04:51 PM

I might be able to help you more if you switched to Slackware
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Dag

Anyway, I went into the BIOS configuration utility and couldn't find anything about cache RAM - however, going on my theory about video memory, I changed the video memory allocation from "Auto" to 8MB. I went back into Linux and started again, and this time it all compiled fine.

Great! That is a big plus if you can get the kernel to compile without crashing.

Quote:


Originally posted by Dag
I enabled ACPI support through the Mandrake configuration utility as well.


I am not sure what this does for you. I really have a difficult time with GUI configs because they hide all the details from you.

Quote:


I rebooted and noticed that three new boot images, 236-7, 236-7sec and 236-7[something, I forgot what x.x] appeared in the LILO menu. I chose 236-7 and got a black screen that didn't go anyway. So, I did a hard reboot and went to linux-secure which is the image I'd been using. It started loading and appeared to be loading ACPI, but when it got to "spurrious IRQ7 interrupt: [some letters/numbers]" it hung and stubbornly refused to do anything. I rebooted again and went through each of the Linux images (now 7 in total for some reason - linux, linux-secure, linux-nofb, failsafe, and the other three new ones) and got either the black screen or the hang at boot.

I put the Mandrake 10 install/rescue disc in, mounted dev/hda2 (Linux partition, obviously), chrooted to /mnt and looked around in etc/lilo.conf - nothing looked out of the ordinary. I went to /boot and opened config with viM, changing all the "y"s related to ACPI and to "m"s - I rebooted again and it did the exact same thing.

So, I have no idea where to go from here ~_~ I just hope this doesn't mean I'm going to have to reinstall Linux again.

I am not sure what you mean by new boot images 236-7, 236-7sec and 236-7, but then again I don't know the first thing about Mandrake. If you would switch to Slackware I can walk you through a kernel compile step by step. With Mandrake I am a bit lost. Which kernel version are you trying to compile? For ACPI I recommend moving to 2.6.x (2.6.7 is the latest). Again I am not sure what Mandrake supports. Another recommendation make a very simple kernel (no acpi) and see if that boots OK, if that works add ACPI support. Compiling kernels on new hardware can be tricky and you have to do things incrementally to make sure nothing breaks. You should be able to run your previous booting kernel just fine. Good luck.

Dag 07-25-2004 05:07 PM

Images was probably the wrong word - you know the list of options for what you want to boot when LILO comes up? I meant that three new items appeared on that list for some reason... I'm not sure if it makes any difference...

I think I'm using Kernel 2.3.6 (which is what the 236 would stand for). Your idea does sound kind of appealing, but I would like to be able to do this without a reinstall. I guess I'll try recompiling again and removing ACPI support.

rovitotv 07-25-2004 06:22 PM

Kernel Compile Howto
 
You are following _ALL_ the directions in the Kernel Compile HOWTO:

Kernel-HOWTO

Usually after the kernel compile a person copies the new kernel from /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage to /boot/name_of_new_kernel. You should also copy the System.map to boot. Change /etc/lilo.conf to reflect your new kernel:
image = /boot/name_of_new_kernel
root = /dev/hda1
label = Label of new kernel
read-only

Then run lilo as root or super user. After all that you can reboot and select your new kernel from the lilo menu. This is a quick overview of the process I would check out the how to for all the information. You want to follow the directions step by step.


To get the version of your kernel type "uname -a" at a command prompt. Good luck.

Dag 07-27-2004 04:58 PM

I was basically following this tutorial exactly, but now I know it's not a problem with my compile (at least, that's not all of it.)

I downloaded Slackware the other night and burned and installed it earlier this morning. I figured I was going to need a reinstall anyway, and I had been planning to "graduate" past Mandrake eventually anyway so this seemed like a good time. I popped in the disc and everything was fine until I loaded the kernel, at which point it wouldn't recognize my keyboard input anymore. That was okay, though, I figured it was probably a USB conflict so I ran it with nousb and it worked fine. After installing it, though, I got the same problem - it got to the login prompt (after loading for a loooong time) and wouldn't recognize keyboard input, even though I'd told it to boot without USB detection.

So, no luck there. I reinstalled Mandrake (again, ugh), being careful to configure everything exactly as I wanted it. As it turns out I hadn't needed to recompile in the first place, all I needed to do was turn on ACPI support with Mandrake's configurator since it was more or less already there.

That didn't really fix things, though. It gave me the exact same problem as before (that is, it wouldn't boot).

I guess what I'll try next is reinstalling (ugh) Slack with no hotplugging, that might fix the problem. If not, though, it looks like no Linux for me on this laptop -_-

I've learned my lesson, though. I'm not buying a Compaq computer ever again (or letting anyone I know do so).

Edit: Posting this from Lynx for no reason in particular. I got Slack to recognize my keyboard by not installing hotplugging and booting with nousb and nohotplug, but now (because I use a USB mouse - I haven't been able to get recognition for my Synpatics Touchpad) it doesn't recognize my mouse and X won't start. -_- Can I mount the mouse manually (preferably without screwing up my keyboard)?


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