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-   -   Can Slackware Linux 12.2 be loaded on a Dell Studio XPS Laptop? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-laptop-and-netbook-25/can-slackware-linux-12-2-be-loaded-on-a-dell-studio-xps-laptop-723190/)

Twilight_Bandit 05-02-2009 03:00 PM

Can Slackware Linux 12.2 be loaded on a Dell Studio XPS Laptop?
 
I'm a Linux newbie, but the software refuses to install on my Dell laptop. During installation after logging in as "root", I get "root@slackware: /#" prompt which is good. I want the laptop to be dual bootable either "Windows" or "Slackware Linux 12.2". The prompt if I give it a cfdisk command says Bad Partition; something about cylinders in final block. The Fdisk command gives me a partition error also. Is Linux mainly intended for desktops? If not, what are the step-by-step instructions to get it up and running. Installation for me anyway is not very user-friendly. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Zmyrgel 05-02-2009 05:12 PM

Slackware is pretty much targeted to little bit more experienced users but you can install it too if your willing to learn.
Good resource is the slackbook. It should cover the slackware installation.

Did you give correct disk for cfdisk and fdisk? Like 'cfdisk /dev/sda'?

Twilight_Bandit 05-03-2009 10:41 AM

Reply to Slackware Question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zmyrgel (Post 3528028)
Slackware is pretty much targeted to little bit more experienced users but you can install it too if your willing to learn.
Good resource is the slackbook. It should cover the slackware installation.

Did you give correct disk for cfdisk and fdisk? Like 'cfdisk /dev/sda'?


I purchased the 6-set Slackware 12.2 from the Slackware Linux site store. I have an IDE hard drive; but my system gives me a partition error if I try to issue the "fdisk /dev/hda" or cfdisk command. I was wondering if maybe I need to reformat my hard drive load Slackware Linux first, then Windows. Slackware Linux based on problems other people are posting have a lot of issues. I'm open to suggestions. My laptop has a 300GB Hard Drive, Windows Vista; I would like to make it a dual boot system either log on the Windows side or Linux based on what I need to do. I truly believe if I can only partition the hard drive the rest of the full installation will be easy. I 'm probably running it configuration issues associated with Dell.

Hangdog42 05-03-2009 12:15 PM

To be honest, SATA hard drives have been the norm for years in laptops. It is only a few oddballs like netbooks that still seem to use IDE drives.


Try using /dev/sda and see if that doesn't work.

By the way, it is usually best to load Windows first. The Windows installer assumes it is the only OS on the system and it will nuke any bootloader Linux puts on.

farslayer 05-04-2009 08:43 AM

Look at the Linux laptop sites for XPS systems and Slackware. I think you 'll find several how-to's which should give you an indication of what works and what might not.. Slakware should work fine...

http://www.linux-on-laptops.com/dell.html
http://tuxmobil.org/dell.html

Dell XPS 1210 [Slackware 10.2]
Dell XPS m1210 [Slackware 11]
DELL Inspiron XPS M1330 Slackware 12.0
DELL Inspiron XPS T700R Slackware



For the install I would probably start with something like the boot-able gparted CD or the SystemRescue CD and resize the windows partition to free up space on the hard drive. Then do the slackware install to the unpartitioned area.

business_kid 05-10-2009 02:36 PM

IMHO, it's horses for courses.

The bootup as root sounds fine. Root gets the '#' and lusers get '$'. It sounds like you failed to install lilo or grub. But, to quote the Irishman asked for directions:
"If I were you, I wouldn't start from here at all!"

Slackware (which I use) is for experienced users and you have to take the spanners out and do it yourself. Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, and a host of others are for people who want a linux box to have the things m$ windows does well - multimedia automatically doing things, etc.

RPM based systems have a lot of the system thinking for you. If you like that, fine. They also keel over more often in my experience, because updates eventually conflict with something you installed manually or the like, and it all falls down. And when the clever little automagic scripts don't fit what you want to do, you are totally snookered. The problems you are left with can be insoluble.

I got _really_ browned off losing 2 days setting up the system the way I wanted it and having to fight with new systems or learn new stuff. Slackware just goes for the life of the pc. Some keep updating, but not all.

Quick learning curve:
1. Get some system going (e.g ubuntu, Fedora, whatever)
2. Do a linuxfromscratch manually http://www.linuxfromscratch.org
3. Then get to Slackware when Fedora begins to get on your nerves.

vigi 05-29-2009 06:41 PM

I would recommend wolvix2 or vector as easy slackware disro,s.
I use Wolvix as my workstation. It has excellent multimedia applications, is fully compatible to slackware and simple to load.Currently have 6 systems on the one box, all working fine.

I am now using slackware 12.2 on a toshiba NB100. The wolvix packages work very well when you need extras. I have learnt more from slackware than all the others put together. It is excellent. Like many others with netbooks-Just need to sort out wireless.

vonbiber 05-30-2009 04:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Twilight_Bandit (Post 3528525)
I purchased the 6-set Slackware 12.2 from the Slackware Linux site store. I have an IDE hard drive; but my system gives me a partition error if I try to issue the "fdisk /dev/hda" or cfdisk command. I was wondering if maybe I need to reformat my hard drive load Slackware Linux first, then Windows. Slackware Linux based on problems other people are posting have a lot of issues. I'm open to suggestions. My laptop has a 300GB Hard Drive, Windows Vista; I would like to make it a dual boot system either log on the Windows side or Linux based on what I need to do. I truly believe if I can only partition the hard drive the rest of the full installation will be easy. I 'm probably running it configuration issues associated with Dell.

ok, you already have vista installed and it takes up the whole
disk space
before you proceed, you need to do 2 things:
a) defragment your disk
b) shrink your vista partition to make some room for linux
you can use a tool such as gparted for that
my advice: download a linux live distro such as partedmagic
and burn it to a cd or install it to a usb thumb drive
then boot from it and launch gparted
http://partedmagic.com/
After you resized your vista partition you need to reboot on vista
the vista checkdisk will be launched at boot time
it should go ok

after the preliminary steps above, you can proceed and create 2 new
primary partitions

1. boot with a linux system
2. find out the device name of your hard drive
(actually if you ran gparted above, it should display the
name of the device)
if you run this command
# cat /proc/partitions
you should see something like '/dev/hda' or '/dev/sda'
3. let's assume the answer to 2. is '/dev/hda'
(otherwise replace hda by the appropriate device name)
run fdisk to (re)create 3 partitions
a) read the manual of fdisk if you don't know how to use it, then
# fdisk /dev/hda
4. you should have now 3 partitions
/dev/hda1 windows vista
/dev/hda2 linux swap
/dev/hda3 linux
Now, you can proceed and install slackware on /dev/hda3
the only boot loader that comes by default with slackware is lilo
when prompted if you select to install it you'll get a chance
to add the vista system in the menu
if you prefer to use grub, you can start with lilo
then
after the first time you rebooted from your new slackware
system
a) insert the slackware cd
that has the extra directory in it
that's where the grub package is located
and mount it:
# mkdir -p /mnt/cdrom
# mount -o ro /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom
go to that directory:
# cd /mnt/cdrom/extra.....
and install the package with the command
# installpkg grub-<THEVERSIONYOUGOTTHERE>.tgz
b) unmount and remove the cd:
# cd
# umount /mnt/cdrom
(now you can remove the cd)
run grubconfig
this will create a boot menu for you


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