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Linux - Laptop and Netbook Having a problem installing or configuring Linux on your laptop? Need help running Linux on your netbook? This forum is for you. This forum is for any topics relating to Linux and either traditional laptops or netbooks (such as the Asus EEE PC, Everex CloudBook or MSI Wind).

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Old 03-01-2009, 05:52 PM   #1
Jsturm
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Registered: Mar 2009
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Question Can I install Puppy Linux 4.1.2 on my laptop if the hard drive is bad? If so, how?


Okay. My hard drive went bad on my very old laptop (old Toshiba)
and I just wanted to know if there is a way to install Puppy Linux on it. I already tried and it fails to find a "superblock" and then wont work. I don't know what a superblock is by the way.

Last edited by Jsturm; 03-01-2009 at 05:52 PM. Reason: Grammar
 
Old 03-01-2009, 09:18 PM   #2
MS3FGX
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Registered: Jan 2004
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Well if the HDD is bad...then obviously you can't install anything to it. You would need to replace the HDD, or if you really didn't want to spend any money on it, run the OS live from CD or USB (whatever the hardware supports).
 
Old 03-01-2009, 09:37 PM   #3
linus72
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You can run Puppy "live" off USB too. It can save changes "persistance" to the USB, so when you reboot everything is there.
Check out Slitaz too-that's what I'm installing to my Toshiba 7000CT now. It can run live and save changes too.
http://www.slitaz.org/en/about/

Last edited by linus72; 03-01-2009 at 09:39 PM.
 
Old 03-03-2009, 12:03 AM   #4
chubbypuppy
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Registered: Aug 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsturm View Post
Okay. My hard drive went bad on my very old laptop (old Toshiba)
and I just wanted to know if there is a way to install Puppy Linux on it. I already tried and it fails to find a "superblock" and then wont work. I don't know what a superblock is by the way.
Yes you can there are numerous ways of doing it.
You can install to usb
you can install to a multisession cdrw
you can install to a multisession dvdrw
you can save to a memory card
you can run it live, and try to format your hard drive with gparted.
if you can copy just the cd files to the hard drive you can use a wake pup floppy disk which is like a portable bootloader.
If you need more help, post it in the official puppy forum, where you can find hundreds of programs and people to help you, the web link is

http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/

Ps your hard drive isn't broken it needs a proper format.

Last edited by chubbypuppy; 03-03-2009 at 12:05 AM.
 
Old 03-03-2009, 02:23 PM   #5
kcoriginal
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Registered: Oct 2007
Location: US -First Baltimore, then MD Sticks, then NC then Cali now San Antonio.
Distribution: ubuntu 8.04 and Centos 5.2
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Judging from your chosen words, I assume you are a real novice user - so I'll advise based on that assumption.

The easiest way, in this situation, for you to "test" that hard drive, would be to try some various distros other than Puppy. I've learned that Puppy isn't exactly all "point and click". Try Ubuntu, try Fedora, try CentOS or RedHat, try to install Windows XP, even and see how it fairs. You will be suprised what XP will actually run on, though not necessarily be very usable! It WOULD make a fine rudimentary "test" in your case.

The previous commenter may be right that the drive is not actually bad. Installing other OSes is a goo dway to quick-check that.

In order to skip the complications of the "millions of things to know" that would stop a newbie from digging in... I'd say try those methods to get Linux installed. If another distro installs ok, either stay with that distro, or retry Puppy with the Puppy-forums close at hand. Either way, get Linux installed and start exploring. That is the MOST IMPORTANT thing... just get your hands dirty with Linux.

I have found that Ubuntu is the easiest to work with, but you DO lose a lot of the classic "Linux-ness" of Linux. Don't let that discourage you.

Puppy is a great tiny-footprint distro for older machines, but it sacrifices any semblance of ease-of-install in-so-being.

I also highly recommend getting a hold of some CompTIA A+ training materials. They will teach you a LOT about hardware, including how hard-drives function and you will learn a lot that will allow you to answer your own questions and ask even bigger ones!
 
Old 03-03-2009, 03:05 PM   #6
disciplepup
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Registered: Jun 2007
Location: Auckland, NZ
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"Puppy is a great tiny-footprint distro for older machines, but it sacrifices any semblance of ease-of-install in-so-being."

?
Puppy has gparted to partition and format hard drives, and a graphical installation wizard... as long as he boots OK from CD you should be OK.

BTW I've got a computer that refuses to boot Windows or a conventional Linux install, but boots a "frugal" Puppy install fine for some reason although I suspect it is the motherboard that is faulty, not the hard drive.
 
Old 03-03-2009, 03:30 PM   #7
gerryggg
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Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Florida
Distribution: Kubuntu, Puppy, Xubuntu
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Run from USB

I have a Dell laptop that I must have XP installed on for work. I have Puppy installed on a 2g flash drive to use for personal use. I store the .sfs files on the flash drive and when I boot from that it loads the drivers for my wireles N card as well as all the other settings. It allows me to use all the features of the laptop without ever touching the hard drive. It's fast and runs with no hitches. I disagree with some of the other comments in that I have found it to be pretty much point and click.
 
Old 03-03-2009, 09:16 PM   #8
DMcCunney
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcoriginal View Post
Puppy is a great tiny-footprint distro for older machines, but it sacrifices any semblance of ease-of-install in-so-being.
I installed Puupy on an old Fujitsu Lifebook. While it wasn't quite as easy as Xubuntu, which booted from LiveCD, examined my hardware, and had a running Linux session with no questions, it wasn't what I'd call hard.

Puppy required me to answer a couple of questions, like whether to use Xorg or XVESA, and what screen resolution to use, with a test to insure it worked, and Poof!, I had a running Puppy session.

A Full install to HD wasn't hard either, using GPartEd to resize the existing Windows partition, and carve out slices for Puppy and a swap file.

Granted, I'm not a total newbie. I've used computers starting with IBM mainframes and working down for many years, and have used other flavors of Linux. But I still wouldn't call Puppy installation an insuperable task, even for a newbie.
______
Dennis
 
Old 03-03-2009, 10:18 PM   #9
jakobcornelis
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Registered: Feb 2009
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Puppy

I am what on the Puppy forum mentioned earlier is called a rank beginner, yet I installed and started using Puppy with little difficulty, except for installing a certain printer, but got around that by installing another. The thing to understand about Puppy is that you can run it off a live CD entirely out of memory, provided you've got enough memory; I run on 384 Mb - a lot less than the recommended 512 Mb, and as far as I can tell with lots of capacity to spare. My understanding is that you don't need the hard drive, but you do need some other storage medium for a settings storage file - if you can burn to that CD, even that will do. But don't take my word for it - I am just a rank beginner -- go to the site mentioned above, where they'll set you right in no time at all.

JC
 
Old 03-04-2009, 12:29 AM   #10
chubbypuppy
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Registered: Aug 2006
Posts: 7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jakobcornelis View Post
I am what on the Puppy forum mentioned earlier is called a rank beginner, yet I installed and started using Puppy with little difficulty, except for installing a certain printer, but got around that by installing another. The thing to understand about Puppy is that you can run it off a live CD entirely out of memory, provided you've got enough memory; I run on 384 Mb - a lot less than the recommended 512 Mb, and as far as I can tell with lots of capacity to spare. My understanding is that you don't need the hard drive, but you do need some other storage medium for a settings storage file - if you can burn to that CD, even that will do. But don't take my word for it - I am just a rank beginner -- go to the site mentioned above, where they'll set you right in no time at all.

JC
Yes you can run puppy without a hard drive, usb stick or even the cd, because it runs 100% in memory
I've booted up a puppy cd without any hard drive installed, then removed the cd and used puppy live in memory for 3 days straight, how good is that?
 
Old 03-04-2009, 02:26 PM   #11
kcoriginal
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Registered: Oct 2007
Location: US -First Baltimore, then MD Sticks, then NC then Cali now San Antonio.
Distribution: ubuntu 8.04 and Centos 5.2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcoriginal View Post
Judging from your chosen words, I assume you are a real novice user - so I'll advise based on that assumption.

The easiest way, in this situation...

In order to skip the complications of the "millions of things to know" that would stop a newbie from digging in...

Puppy is a great tiny-footprint distro for older machines, but it sacrifices any semblance of ease-of-install in-so-being.

I also highly recommend getting a hold of some CompTIA A+ training materials. They will teach you a LOT about hardware, including how hard-drives function and you will learn a lot that will allow you to answer your own questions and ask even bigger ones!
Lest we forget... this is how my suggestions approached things...
 
Old 03-05-2009, 05:55 PM   #12
seremina
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Registered: Jul 2008
Location: Canada, at the moment
Distribution: Wubi Ubuntu 8.04.1
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Smile If not Puppy, then might I suggest...

Da** Small Linux. I found it easier to use than Puppy and its a lot smaller. Just like Puppy, it'll save sessions, its free, and won't require a hard drive. It runs on far less than what Puppy asks for and its great on antiques. I had an old Toshiba too. It took some effort to get anything installed on it because...

Only CD drive and 32 MB RAM available
no USB ports
no floppy drives
no modem, no Ethernet
no networking cable

So under this scenario, it did take some doing. I wish I had simple instructiosn back then. I miss the dinosaur. What happened to it? Got stolen. I hope they appreciated the Linux and the free software on it. I never did get a chance to try out Xubuntu on it. Oy. Though I don't have the dinosaur anymore, I have Da** Small Linux, Ubuntu, and WinXP. They're my Mighty Three. *giggles*
 
  


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