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-   -   Best Battery Life on Lenovo Thinkpad t500? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-laptop-and-netbook-25/best-battery-life-on-lenovo-thinkpad-t500-821963/)

john_f_somers 07-24-2010 09:02 PM

Best Battery Life on Lenovo Thinkpad t500?
 
Hello,

I am wondering how to get the best battery life on a Lenovo Thinkpad T500 running Ubuntu 10.04. I recently purchased this system from LinuxCertified.com. I usually have installed Linux myself when I have purchased a new system. However, given the fact that I wanted the system soon and Lenovo said it would take three weeks, I figured I would give support to a company based around Linux. In any event, I am quite pleased with the laptop but would like to know if anyone has any helpful advice concerning Linux and laptop batteries. I am aware of the general things one should and should not do with batteries. However, I would like to get the most efficient use of the battery possible, a life comparable to that I would get in Windows XP Pro. (For the record, I prefer Linux to Windows on every count except this one. Having had Linux on several laptops, I have always seemed to notice that this is the one area in which Windows seems to outperform Linux. I would love to correct this problem.)

John

Laurens73 07-25-2010 08:42 AM

Ubuntu provides packages wich can be installed with your favourite package manager. Make sure the following packages are installed:

cpufreqd, cpufrequtils, libcpufreq0, acpi-support,

If you're using Gnome:
gnome-applets, gnome-power-manager

If you're using XFCE):
xfce4-cpufreq-plugin, xfce4-power-manager, xfce4-power-manager-plugins


After installing, add the extension to your panel, or acces the settings via the Gnome / XFCE menu. There should be a menu item with the power settings when running on batteries to lower the cpu frequency and monitor brightness saving your batteries.

john_f_somers 07-25-2010 05:38 PM

Thanks and Follow Up
 
Thank you. I have done all of the above. Within the power-manager applet, the only thing that you've mentioned that I do not see is a way to lower the cpu frequency. I do not mean to be obtuse, but, would mind directing me to a screenshot or something? If you cannot, no big deal, you have helped me with much of what I wanted to do anyway. :-)

JS

Quote:

Originally Posted by Laurens73 (Post 4044748)
Ubuntu provides packages wich can be installed with your favourite package manager. Make sure the following packages are installed:

cpufreqd, cpufrequtils, libcpufreq0, acpi-support,

If you're using Gnome:
gnome-applets, gnome-power-manager

If you're using XFCE):
xfce4-cpufreq-plugin, xfce4-power-manager, xfce4-power-manager-plugins


After installing, add the extension to your panel, or acces the settings via the Gnome / XFCE menu. There should be a menu item with the power settings when running on batteries to lower the cpu frequency and monitor brightness saving your batteries.


Laurens73 07-25-2010 06:42 PM

Sure, no problem :) I'm also using a laptop, so it's quite easy to show. I'm using XFCE and within XFCE the settings can be obtained as shown in this file. I linked it as a normal url cause my laptop has a full-HD screen (1920x1080) and could get a lot of people into trouble when posting it as an image. Cause my system is half english, half dutch I'll put the menu structure in words for you: XFCE Menu >> Settings >> XFCE Settings manager >> Power Manager >> Extended [CPU Frequency Control].

I hope you're an XFCE user too, cause I don't know where the position is in Gnome.

john_f_somers 07-25-2010 07:07 PM

Thanks...
 
It is curious...the Gnome version of the program is seemingly the same in every respect save the cpu frequency option. I greatly appreciate your help with this. As with all things Linux, this program must be a front-end for a program that I could run in the terminal so perhaps I will do some research about adjusting the cpu frequency that way.

Failing that, I guess I will have to use XFCE, at least when running off the battery.
:-)

Cheers,

JS

Quote:

Originally Posted by Laurens73 (Post 4045163)
Sure, no problem :) I'm also using a laptop, so it's quite easy to show. I'm using XFCE and within XFCE the settings can be obtained as shown in this file. I linked it as a normal url cause my laptop has a full-HD screen (1920x1080) and could get a lot of people into trouble when posting it as an image. Cause my system is half english, half dutch I'll put the menu structure in words for you: XFCE Menu >> Settings >> XFCE Settings manager >> Power Manager >> Extended [CPU Frequency Control].

I hope you're an XFCE user too, cause I don't know where the position is in Gnome.


john_f_somers 07-25-2010 07:38 PM

Solved.
 
I have found the solution. It would seem that GNOME puts CPU frequency scaling in a separate applet in the panel. So, I added this applet to the panel and then was able to adjust the cpu frequency at will! Thanks for your help. :-)

JS
Quote:

Originally Posted by john_f_somers (Post 4045178)
It is curious...the Gnome version of the program is seemingly the same in every respect save the cpu frequency option. I greatly appreciate your help with this. As with all things Linux, this program must be a front-end for a program that I could run in the terminal so perhaps I will do some research about adjusting the cpu frequency that way.

Failing that, I guess I will have to use XFCE, at least when running off the battery.
:-)

Cheers,

JS


Laurens73 07-25-2010 09:02 PM

You're welcome :)


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