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-   -   What is the best Video card for Linux? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-hardware-18/what-is-the-best-video-card-for-linux-629303/)

ahsiii 03-19-2008 06:03 PM

What is the best Video card for Linux?
 
I have a Custom built system with amd64 x2 1gig ram, I messed up, by mistake and got a integrated motherboard with ati radeon x1250. however i intend to remedy this by buying a new video card.

I would like to know what is the best Video card to work with linux is, non-distro specific, I tend to like to test distro's as they come available, so generally speaking "best video card for Linux" If you could share your experience with video cards.

Thank you very much in advance.


--ahsiii

onebuck 03-19-2008 07:00 PM

Hi,

You could always look at the 'HCL' that is at the top of the window.

budword 03-19-2008 07:04 PM

Nvidia is the best supported, as long as you don't mind running proprietary drivers. There have been problems with the 8600 I think, so you might want to avoid that, at least until it gets sorted out.

David

H_TeXMeX_H 03-20-2008 09:02 AM

Certainly ATI is NOT the way to go. Anything but that. If you want to play the newest games, get an nvidia card, and for now, use the proprietary drivers. Maybe in a few good years, we will have FLOSS nvidia drivers that support 3D accel. I have an 8800 and it works just fine.

celem 03-24-2009 05:35 PM

Problems with Nvidia
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by budword (Post 3094372)
Nvidia is the best supported, ...

I had very bad luck with Nvidia and I am searching for something better. I built up a new PC specifically for a Linux system. Regrettably I selected a BioStar TF8200 A2+ e/w integrated Nvidia GeForce 8200 video. It gave me unholy grief. The latest drivers (January, 2009) worked some better but generally poor - it actually slowed down the system. The killer for me was jumpy, streaked video playback. I finally gave up and loaded Windows XP, whose drivers worked correctly and yielded a 1,000 times faster machine. Personally, I will avoid Nvidea but I am having trouble finding a suitable video cared, namely one that gets good Linux marks yet is still manufactured. If I can find good hardware I'll try again to build up a Linux only box.

Electro 03-24-2009 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by celem (Post 3486579)
I had very bad luck with Nvidia and I am searching for something better. I built up a new PC specifically for a Linux system. Regrettably I selected a BioStar TF8200 A2+ e/w integrated Nvidia GeForce 8200 video. It gave me unholy grief. The latest drivers (January, 2009) worked some better but generally poor - it actually slowed down the system. The killer for me was jumpy, streaked video playback. I finally gave up and loaded Windows XP, whose drivers worked correctly and yielded a 1,000 times faster machine. Personally, I will avoid Nvidea but I am having trouble finding a suitable video cared, namely one that gets good Linux marks yet is still manufactured. If I can find good hardware I'll try again to build up a Linux only box.

Probably one of your problems is the pre-compiled distributions that can cause some performance penalty. Other problems is you care too much about eye candy effects. Using Compiz or Beryl on a daily basis to suit your eye candy obsession does penalizes your performance and stability. Your experience of Linux could limit how well your setup will perform in Linux. Like in any OS, you have to read what options are there and if they can increase performance. nVidia does have many options that improves performance. Also using distributions like Gentoo can help you to tweak performance of the whole setup further than just enabling nVidia options.

I have both nVidia and ATI cards that work. Both have different ways to set them up and have different ways to tweak their performance.

BTW, I suggest do not dig up old posts. Create a new post and link posts that resemble your own thread that you started.

celem 03-24-2009 08:21 PM

No eye candy
 
I turn off all eye candy because it serves no useful purpose. I have no problem with Linux on other machines that I have, only with the NVidia driver on the Nvidia GeForce 8200, and this was several different distributions from Ubuntu to Sabayon. I have been using Linux since it was on a huge stack of floppies but never before experienced the problems that I described.

As far as old posts, I felt that my comment might benefit the original poster.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Electro (Post 3486710)
Probably one of your problems is the pre-compiled distributions that can cause some performance penalty. Other problems is you care too much about eye candy effects. Using Compiz or Beryl on a daily basis to suit your eye candy obsession does penalizes your performance and stability. Your experience of Linux could limit how well your setup will perform in Linux. Like in any OS, you have to read what options are there and if they can increase performance. nVidia does have many options that improves performance. Also using distributions like Gentoo can help you to tweak performance of the whole setup further than just enabling nVidia options.

I have both nVidia and ATI cards that work. Both have different ways to set them up and have different ways to tweak their performance.

BTW, I suggest do not dig up old posts. Create a new post and link posts that resemble your own thread that you started.


armandojnc 07-02-2010 01:19 AM

Still what is the best card for linux
 
Linux is the best OS but why keep making the user
Know and discover that (water boils) is beyond
My comprehension , beware of the very so called savvy
Some graphic chips ( specially SIS )
Are the worst for linux , the question is still unsolved however
WHO MAKES the best cards for Linux?
Does any one knows?
I dont think theres anybody here

LinusStallman 01-22-2012 01:49 PM

As of 2012 - What is the best video card for GNU/Linux?

ATI, Nvidia or other?

cascade9 01-23-2012 06:55 AM

ATI doesnt really exist anymore, its now all AMD GPUs/APUs.

There is no 'best video card for linux. Cards vary in performance, price, power use, heat ouput, etc.. nVidia and AMD/ATI are the only ones worth looking at for linux. Intel doesnt make video cards.

All of them have had problems with linux and video here and there- Intel, nVidia and ATI/AMD. The newer the GPU/APU/intel video adapter (I never call intel video chips 'GPUs' they dont diserve the name) the more likely you are to have problems in general.

AMD/ATI and intel tend to release the most documentation for the video chips/GPUs/APUs they make. AMD/ATI have developers working on the open soruce drivers as well. nVidia doesnt release anything apart from the closed drivers.....they have even discontinued the 'nv' open source (but obfuscated) drivers. They only release the closed source driver these days, and no documentation.

TobiSGD 01-23-2012 02:28 PM

From my experience from the past 3-4 years in Linux: I neither had any problems with Nvidia or ATI/AMD, when using the proprietary drivers. You may have issues on newer cards when using the free drivers (regardless if AMD/ATI or Nvidia). I had some problems with an older Intel GPU (852/855GM), you may also have some issues with the newer (CPU-inbuilt) HD GPUs from Intel when not using the latest kernel/X/Mesa, but I can't really say that from my experience, don't have a newer Intel machine at this time.

My view on it: The whole "Nvidia is better for Linux than ATI/AMD" is a left over from past times, especially repeated over and over again from people that haven't tried anything else than Nvidia for years. I can say that I have just recently replaced my Nvidia card (GTX260) with an AMD card (HD6870), just because I knew that there won't be problems (and there ar no problems) and that I will get a decent performance for a good price. If there were similar performance for the same price from Nvidia I just had bought that, also not expecting any problems. AMD also works on the low-end for me, no issues with the integrated HD3200 in my laptop. I would expect the same for low-end Nvidia GPUs.

The only thing where you really might have problems with graphics in Linux is if you buy a laptop with NVidia Optimus technology, the "way better for Linux" company refuses at all to support it for the free OS.

terminatorul 06-06-2012 10:24 AM

I have a Sapphire ATI Radeon X1650 card at home, which is an old card now, and the free drivers under Slackware 13.37 32-bit have lower performance than the Windows ones. Which is what they actually state on the drivers page on the X Window System website. I can play World of Warcraft under Wine at somewhere under 10 FPS (I also have an old CPU, Celeron-D). I heard (but did not try) that the proprietary drivers for such old ATI cards no longer work with recent Linux distributions, and the AMD drivers website also sais they only support the old distributions (most likely since when the drivers where first released).

But they also say ATI made the chip specifications available, so the free drivers can be improved, which I think is important. Otherwise, the "better" proprietary drivers from nvidia for example might have the same fate as the properietary ati drivers: they will no longer work with some new rendering infrastructure from the next X version.

But to get an informed opinion, I think one should consult the website for the X Window System first, pick some well-enough supported chipset (if you can find one :) ), than pick a video card based on that chipset. You will need to do a little search for this, but you should get used to search the internet for what you need anyway. They have some nice user documentation pages for their drivers, so you don't need to worry about techical details there.

amani 06-06-2012 10:41 AM

ATI radeon should be fine as it is also against anti-proprietary drivers.
But try to get completely open hardware. There are a few available.


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