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Old 09-24-2011, 08:45 AM   #1
Kenny_Strawn
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Technical differences between rooting and jailbreaking?!


The reason why I am posting this in "Linux - Hardware" is because it happens to be Android device-related: I am curious as to what the difference is between rooting an Android device and jailbreaking an iPhone, as they seem to be used almost interchangeably. In particular, just what are you doing (from a technical standpoint) when you jailbreak an iPhone versus when you root something with Android?

Last edited by Kenny_Strawn; 09-24-2011 at 08:50 AM.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 08:55 AM   #2
smallpond
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny_Strawn View Post
The reason why I am posting this in "Linux - Hardware" is because it happens to be Android device-related: I am curious as to what the difference is between rooting an Android device and jailbreaking an iPhone, as they seem to be used almost interchangeably.
rooting means to get privileged access, the ability to run code as "root".
jailbreaking means to remove limitations on running protected operations.
Although similar, they aren't the same. Root access only allows you to remove limitations if they are due to permissions - not if they are hard-coded in firmware, for example. Jailbreaking might remove a firmware-imposed limitation by modifying the firmware but not give full access to a system.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 01:30 PM   #3
craigevil
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iOS jailbreaking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_jailbreaking
Quote:
iOS jailbreaking, or simply jailbreaking, is the process of removing the limitations imposed by Apple on devices running the iOS operating system through use of custom kernels. Such devices include the iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, and 2nd Gen Apple TV. Jailbreaking allows users to gain full access (or root access) to the operating system, allowing iOS users to download additional applications, extensions, and themes that are unavailable through the official Apple App Store, via installers such as Cydia. A jailbroken iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad running iOS can still use the App Store, iTunes, and other normal functions, such as making telephone calls. Unlike rooting an Android device, jailbreaking is necessary if the user intends to run software not authorized by Apple.
At its core, jailbreaking an Apple iOS device gives access to its root filesystem, allowing modification and installing third-party software components. This gives the user more control over the device and may enable features that were previously unavailable. In many cases, jailbreaking also voids the device's warranty.
Under the DMCA of 2010, jailbreaking Apple iDevices is legal in the United States, although Apple has announced that the practice "can void the warranty."[1] However, the jailbreaking process does not include any modification to the hardware, so it can be quickly and easily reversed simply by restoring the operating system through iTunes.
Rooting (Android OS) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rooting_(Android_OS)
Quote:
Rooting is a process that allows users of mobile phones and other devices running the Android operating system to attain privileged control (known as "root access") within Android's Linux subsystem with the goal of overcoming limitations that carriers and manufacturers put on some devices. It is analogous to jailbreaking on devices running the Apple iOS operating system.
 
Old 09-24-2011, 03:07 PM   #4
Kenny_Strawn
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Thanks guys. Marking this thread Solved...
 
  


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