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Old 05-19-2009, 10:02 AM   #1
fretboardwarrior
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Angry Redhat 9.0 installation problem in laptops with sata hard drive......


Hi,
With all deu respect to linux gurus,
I have dell inspiron 1525 in which there is sata hdd, when i tried to install redhat 9, on it i showed me a message, (something related to hdd driver problem) i faced same problem while installing xp on dell, but i used nlite and integrated hdd driver in xp and prob. get resolved,
Kindly tell me the way to how to integrate driver in linux, i have to recompile the kernel or what should i do ti install redhat in coming generation of laptops.

Regards:

Gomzi...
 
Old 05-19-2009, 10:16 AM   #2
amani
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Try Fedora 10 ...it is Redhat 19
 
Old 05-19-2009, 10:38 AM   #3
forrestt
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RH9 did not have SATA support. Red Hat is no longer supported and hasn't been for years. (Red Hat is NOT Red Hat Enterprise Linux). Try Fedora 10 as amani suggests.

Forrest
 
Old 05-19-2009, 12:45 PM   #4
fretboardwarrior
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Thumbs down my queation is something else

Quote:
Originally Posted by amani View Post
Try Fedora 10 ...it is Redhat 19
Im not asking for alternative linux distros , if u know any thing related to the question thn lemme know........

to choose another distro is not a solution to this problem...
 
Old 05-19-2009, 01:03 PM   #5
custangro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fretboardwarrior View Post
Im not asking for alternative linux distros , if u know any thing related to the question thn lemme know........

to choose another distro is not a solution to this problem...
Note forrestt post
Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt
RH9 did not have SATA support. Red Hat is no longer supported and hasn't been for years.
Red Hat 9 IS NOT SUPPORTED so choosing another distro is the solution to the problem.

-C
 
Old 05-19-2009, 01:06 PM   #6
forrestt
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In order to get rh9 to work, you will need to rebuild the install media with a kernel that has SATA support. You will also need to update the kernel that is installed onto the system with one that supports SATA and then rebuild the repo. This is a very complex subject, and isn't one that can really be accomplished via online help from a forum.

Now, that being said. If I were to ask you how to install Windows 3.1 on a computer with SATA drives, how would you go about telling me how to do it? Give me detailed instructions on installing Windows 3.1 on my AMD 64bit SATA drive computer, and then I'll give you instructions on installing RH9.

In the meantime, why don't you consider installing Fedora?

HTH

Forrest
 
Old 05-19-2009, 08:43 PM   #7
cgtueno
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Hi

Forrestt is correct. Red Hat 9 did not support SATA hard disks out of the box.

You would be facing an extremely challenging up hill battle to try and integrate SATA support into Red Hat 9 for a number of reasons. The first has been pointed out that you would have to build a custom kernel. The problems which would follow would be horrendous, particularly since you would have to also incorporate into this kernel all the necessary software modifications to support the more advanced hardware that will be present on your motherboard and peripherals. Red Hat 9 would not have the necessary software to support any advanced integrated (and non-integrated) hardware (NICs, new chipset features, etc) of more recent manufacture. Then there is the issue of all the other modifications that Red hat incorporated into their original customized kernel to support their Distro.

In this instance if you required a Red Hat 9 environment, the simplest solution would be to pickup a used system of a lower class (say a PIII), trick the hardware up to it's maximum capability (max processor, RAM, etc), and use that as your development platform. You could link your more modern (advanced) PC to the Red Hat (less advanced) PC by Ethernet and use SSH to access the Red Hat Machine. With a monitor on the red Hat machine you will be able to execute your applications as though you were working directly(locally) on it in many cases.

Such a solution would probably meet your requirements without spending a large chunk of your life on converting a Red Hat 9 factory install to meet your purposes.

I personally have a lot of old hardware running Red Hat 8.0 and 9 for personal development purposes, etc since it is a great solution (allbeit with a lot of draw backs compared to modern Distros). However, I also use more recent distros on more current hardware and login to the Red Hat boxes remotely (As I have suggested to you above), depending on my requirements.

If you want to learn about building a kernel may I suggest that you start by reading the Linux Howto documents at LDP. From there you can progress to reading some of the documents on Linux Kernel design. You will need to pay attention to the era of kernel you intend to build when reading materials related to kernel design and building, since there have been a number of significant changes to the Kernel design since the Kernel incorporated in Red Hat 9 was released.

If your original post is really a request for someone to point you to a cookbook tested procedure that you can follow to simply upgrade Red Hat 9 to handle SATA hard disks then I'm afraid I believe you are out of luck. It was a topic of hot discussion years ago. With most people concluding that it was simply easier to use Red Hat 9 on legacy hardware, and move on with modern distributions on modern hardware.

Hope that assists.

Chris
 
Old 05-19-2009, 09:11 PM   #8
John VV
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fretboardwarrior
if you DO NOT want to use anything besides RH9 then
Buy a 10 to 15 year old computer and install it on that
rh9 NEVER had the ability and NEVER WILL be able to run on sata
it is TO OLD
 
Old 05-19-2009, 09:30 PM   #9
billymayday
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Or could you run RH9 in a virtual machine on top of CentOS or similar? Don't know the answer, thought I'd throw the question out there.
 
Old 05-19-2009, 09:35 PM   #10
custangro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billymayday View Post
Or could you run RH9 in a virtual machine on top of CentOS or similar? Don't know the answer, thought I'd throw the question out there.
If fretboardwarrior doesn't want to move away from RH9, then this will probably be his best bet...

-C
 
Old 05-19-2009, 09:54 PM   #11
cgtueno
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John VV

Your "10 to 15 years" comment is pushing it a bit mate.

Red Hat 9 was released in retail packs in 2003.

I have it currently running in SMP on HP blade servers with Dual PIII-850 processors quite happily, as well as PIII-933 based HP servers which are less than 6 years old.

Actually it's a nice solution since after the Red Hat 9 vintage there were extensive design changes made to the SCSI driver model in Linux which obsoleted SCSI Controller support for a wide range of older server SCSI RAID controllers using older chipsets.

Old hardware absolutely. But hardly 10 to 15 years !

OMGoodness! you're not suggesting trying running Red Hat 9 on a '486, it's only just usable on a P200. Shudders at the thought!

Laughing

Chris
 
  


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