LinuxQuestions.org
Support LQ: Use code LQ3 and save $3 on Domain Registration
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware
User Name
Password
Linux - Hardware This forum is for Hardware issues.
Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-09-2005, 05:00 PM   #1
Malacandra
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 44

Rep: Reputation: 15
Ready to remove Windows for good...help


The time is here. I have been using MEPIS for a while with great joy.

MEPIS is installed where Suse used to be, on about 8 gigs of a 120 gig HD. I want to remove Windows and have my whole HD available. (the Windows part, 90+ gigs is NTFS).

Here are my questions:

(1) How would I go about putting the Windows partition to use? Obviously I'll have to format it.

(2) Is it possible to recombine two partitions (without data loss? doesn't seem possible).

(3) Would it be possible to move the home directories to the big partition? (I'd like to get the home directories by themselves so I can install other distros if I ever want to).

(4) Should I just completely start from scratch? (I can backup everything on the home network and using CDs and DVDs.

(5) Anything else I should be considering with such a move?

Some general advice on how to set this up is much appreciated.

mb
 
Old 08-09-2005, 05:23 PM   #2
leonscape
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian SID / KDE 3.5
Posts: 2,313

Rep: Reputation: 47
You can do a

mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdxx

To move the files from the home partition, login as root, and then mount the new file system.

mkdir /mnt/tmphome
mount /dev/hdxx /mnt/tmphome
cp -a /home/* /mnt/tmphome/

now unmount the new home disk and remount as home.

umount /mnt/tmphome
mount /dev/hdxx /home

Check everthings fine and working, the unmount the new home and delete the old files.

cd /home
rm -rF *

Remount the new and your away.

Then don't forget to edit the fstab file, adding a line like
/dev/hda5 /home ext3 defaults 0 2

I would backup things first, though.

Last edited by leonscape; 08-09-2005 at 05:29 PM.
 
Old 08-09-2005, 08:52 PM   #3
Malacandra
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 44

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
plz bear with my n00bness.....

You are talking about doing that after having formatted the large partition, correct?

thanks for the reply

mb
 
Old 08-09-2005, 08:56 PM   #4
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 66
I would just back up my files, back up /home, and reinstall Mepis. Reinstall is--what--twenty minutes? And that way you know you have a clean install.
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:03 PM   #5
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi,

If i were you, id format the whole HD after backing up what files you need. Then, id use FDISK to make one active partition then format it.

When the whole HD is formatted, i would install Linux Mepis and use QTParted to make your new partitions during install.

This is how my HD's are partition just as an FYI:

1st 40g drive:

Hda1 40g NTFS WinXP

2nd 120g drive:

Hdb1 10g .ext3 /root (mepis)
hdb2 10g .ext3 /home (seperate /home partition for all my uder settings ect for easier backup)
hdb3 1g SWAP
hdb4 98g FAT32. (Use FAT32 for your file system if you do decide on using windows again as both Windows and Linux can read from FAT32 file system drives.)
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:08 PM   #6
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 66
You don't need to format the drive before reinstalling Mepis if all you want is Mepis (i.e., no dual-boot). Just install it and select "Auto-Install using entire disk."
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:14 PM   #7
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi,

Yes, you could do that but i didnt like how Mepis wanted to do my partitions...
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:19 PM   #8
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
Hi,

Yes, you could do that but i didnt like how Mepis wanted to do my partitions...
Just out of curiosity, since I've never done the auto-install, how did Mepis layout the partitions? Do you remember?
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:28 PM   #9
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Rep: Reputation: 16
Hmm, i cant remember the full layout but i know it wanted a 2.7g SWAP file and the rest of the HD i think as one partition.
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:46 PM   #10
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
Hmm, i cant remember the full layout but i know it wanted a 2.7g SWAP file and the rest of the HD i think as one partition.
Weird. Then, I definitely wouldn't leave it up to Mepis. But I think you can still do all your partitioning with QTParted. I don't think you have to do a preformat.

I'd partition the 120 GB as follows:

Twice the RAM for Swap (so if you have 256 MB of RAM, make a 512 MB swap partition).

10 GB for / (root), unless you think you'll install a hell of a lot of programs.

109 GB for /home
 
Old 08-10-2005, 12:00 AM   #11
Malacandra
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Posts: 44

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Acutally, I was more wondering whether you have to entirely reinstall MEPIS. It's already on there.

Of course, I'd like it on a bigger partition.

If I remember correctly, the MEPIS install allows you to pick the sizes of the partitions.

mb
 
Old 08-10-2005, 01:09 AM   #12
Electro
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Twice the RAM for Swap (so if you have 256 MB of RAM, make a 512 MB swap partition).
That is old school. These days you do not need swap. I create multiple swap partitions that are around 256 MB. If I am putting my swap on other hard drives, I delete a few swap partitions that I do not need. Then I combine them into a partition that I can use.

I suggest making partitions for /boot, /var, /home, and /. I strongly suggest you put /var on a seperate partition because logs tend to fill up fast if something goes wrong. Linux will not freeze if /var is on a seperate partition. Usually the man utility will not work. It is best to put /boot on a seperate partition just in case the boot loader screws up and corrupts it. If it corrupts it, the /boot partition can easily be re-created while the / partiton is safe. The size for /boot does not have to be huge. It can be around 16 MB to 64 MB. For /var you can give 200 MB to 300 MB. Do not size partitions by megabytes. Size them by whole cylinders. This way you get every last byte of storage out of the hard drive.

Since, you are in a phase of completely switching to Linux, you probably want to try another distribution. You can try Gentoo because in the future you may have problems upgrading with packaged based distributions. Gentoo fixes all of this because every program is configured, compiled, and installed.

Look into VMware because sometimes Crossover Office and WINE will not work well with certain programs. Also VMware is able to work with USB, COM, parallel devices, so you can use unsupported USB, COM, parallel devices in an OS that supports them.
 
Old 08-10-2005, 04:59 AM   #13
springshades
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Location: Near Lansing, MI , USA
Distribution: Mainly just Mandriva these days.
Posts: 304

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
I suggest making partitions for /boot, /var, /home, and /.
If I remember correctly, you can't do this in the Mepis install EVEN in advanced partition settings. I remember because I like having things split up separately as well and it annoyed me by only allowing me to make a / and a /home partition (and a swap partition).

Quote:
These days you do not need swap.
This simply isn't true. Unless you're talking about making a swap file instead of swap partitions that is. The swap is needed if you don't have enough RAM to run everything on your system comfortably and you don't want your system to slow to a crawl. Basing your swap as a multiple of your RAM isn't a good idea though as often times if you have less RAM you'll need more swap. If you have a very large amount of RAM and only plan on using your computer as a normal desktop, you probably don't need any at all (though it's not like it hurts to section off a gig of a 120 gig drive).

To the OP, not sure I remember how the partitioning tool works in Mepis, but you should be able to just delete the old Windows partition, and then resizing one of your current partitions into the left over space.

Quote:
Since, you are in a phase of completely switching to Linux, you probably want to try another distribution. You can try Gentoo because in the future you may have problems upgrading with packaged based distributions.
HOLD on there cowboy. Malacandra may not have the experience,

Quote:
plz bear with my n00bness.....
nor the desire to deal with that sort of thing. Obviously you can decide for yourself Malacandra, but you should AT LEAST get a warning as to what you're getting into with Gentoo. You have to expect that you aren't going to have a full operating system with a graphical environment and all your favorite goodies for possibly days (LITERALLY) depending on your system due to the fact that you would be compiling everything that goes onto your computer. If you've ever recompiled your kernel and kernel modules before (it can takes hours), you'll understand that compiling all of the programs on your system will take a LONG time. Seriously, reinstalling Mepis every couple years will take MUCH less time in the long run than the updates on Gentoo that have to be compiled on your machine. Mepis is a pretty darn good distro and if you're comfortable with it, stick with it.
 
Old 08-10-2005, 08:53 AM   #14
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally posted by Electro
I suggest making partitions for /boot, /var, /home, and /. I strongly suggest you put /var on a seperate partition because logs tend to fill up fast if something goes wrong. Linux will not freeze if /var is on a seperate partition. Usually the man utility will not work. It is best to put /boot on a seperate partition just in case the boot loader screws up and corrupts it. If it corrupts it, the /boot partition can easily be re-created while the / partiton is safe. The size for /boot does not have to be huge. It can be around 16 MB to 64 MB. For /var you can give 200 MB to 300 MB. Do not size partitions by megabytes. Size them by whole cylinders. This way you get every last byte of storage out of the hard drive.
If the /var folder tends to fill up quickly, why would you want it on a separate partition? That would seem to be a good reason to not have it on a separate partition, because what happens when the partition gets full? If it's just a folder, it can get as big as it wants to get. Also, Mepis has a wonderful utility for reinstalling Grub, just in case the boot loader gets messed up.

And, as the last post-er said, I don't even think Mepis lets you choose having a separate /boot and /var. I think your only choices are /home / and swap. And, frankly, on 120 GB hard drive, who cares how big a swap partition is?

Your post seems really strange. A newbie says, "I want to get rid of Windows and expand my Mepis partition," and you say, "Hey, how about using Gentoo"?

In any case, it is possible to expand your current partition, but any time you're repartitioning, you should be backing up all your data anyway, and if you do that, how hard is it to get a clean reinstall?
 
Old 08-10-2005, 06:11 PM   #15
Electro
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
If the /var folder tends to fill up quickly, why would you want it on a separate partition?
I just told you. If /var is on the same partition as / and a file in /var/log such as messages increases in size. It could take up the whole / partition and freeze your computer. The freezing is done by the huge massive file which may be a size of several gigabytes. You can not run any programs or services. It is safer to put /var on a seperate partition than putting on /. It happened to me a few times, but I was smart enough to put /var on a seperate partition. I just clear out /var/log/messages that was over 100 megabytes and I'm back in business. This is mention on serveral web sites why /var is better to put on a seperate partition.

Quote:
This simply isn't true. Unless you're talking about making a swap file instead of swap partitions that is. The swap is needed if you don't have enough RAM to run everything on your system comfortably and you don't want your system to slow to a crawl. Basing your swap as a multiple of your RAM isn't a good idea though as often times if you have less RAM you'll need more swap. If you have a very large amount of RAM and only plan on using your computer as a normal desktop, you probably don't need any at all (though it's not like it hurts to section off a gig of a 120 gig drive).
If the user has 128 MB of RAM or more, the swap partition is not really needed. Anything less than that you will have to make a swap partition, but the tip is ok if you are setting up a server or running GUI.

The reason why I made multiple 256 MB swap partitions on one drive is because for future flexbility. If I want to give some more space to the /var partition, I am able to do that with out doing any math or with out formatting two partitions. This way I can delete two partitions and make one. Then just format one partition while the other swap partitions are already format, so the errors and time are reduced. Right now I have 1 GB of RAM.

Quote:
nor the desire to deal with that sort of thing. Obviously you can decide for yourself Malacandra, but you should AT LEAST get a warning as to what you're getting into with Gentoo. You have to expect that you aren't going to have a full operating system with a graphical environment and all your favorite goodies for possibly days (LITERALLY) depending on your system due to the fact that you would be compiling everything that goes onto your computer. If you've ever recompiled your kernel and kernel modules before (it can takes hours), you'll understand that compiling all of the programs on your system will take a LONG time. Seriously, reinstalling Mepis every couple years will take MUCH less time in the long run than the updates on Gentoo that have to be compiled on your machine. Mepis is a pretty darn good distro and if you're comfortable with it, stick with it.
Gentoo has excellent documentation for any novice user that does not mind reading step by step. There are three stages of Gentoo. Malacandra could pick stage 3 and only install the binary files that comes from the CD or Portage tree. That will get Malacandra up in 25 to 60 minutes depending on his or her reading comprehension and computer performance. Configure and compiling the kernel is very easy if Malacandra picked kernel version 2.6.x. By running `make oldconfig` before running `make menuconfig`, it will use Gentoo's installer kernel config to give Malacandra a head start configuring the kernel. Just do not use genkernel because it has never worked for me correctly. When Malacandra has time and patients, the programs can be updated and compiled without Malacandra being at his or her computer because of how Portage works. On a Pentium 4 2.0 GHz (Northwood core) with 256 MB of RAM it took about 17 hours, so I suggest starting it Friday night to use the computer Saturday afternoon.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Remove Animated windows Sence2001 Red Hat 1 03-29-2004 08:15 PM
Linux not ready for Laptop but Windows is? flysideways Linux - Laptop and Netbook 4 12-10-2003 04:25 AM
Ready to be Windows FREE!!! scottwest2 LinuxQuestions.org Member Success Stories 2 07-03-2003 02:40 PM
Windows sees printer as installed and ready, but won't print phishead Linux - Networking 17 04-08-2003 12:15 AM
Remove windows How?????? Zarik Linux - Newbie 2 02-15-2003 05:12 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:52 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration