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Old 02-10-2005, 07:30 PM   #1
PC_Pal68
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Question for RAM and/or Mobo expert


I have a spare PII 350. Just installed Xandros on it. I want to maximize the RAM on it. The MoBo is a Aopen AXBC :

http://global.aopen.com.tw/products/mb/ax6bc.htm

It's a 100MHZ (440BX) board with a max of768MB of RAM.

To my knowlegde, these boards that can take a max of 256MB per slot, are compatible with double-sided memory, either PC100 or PC133 (clocks down to 100).

I have alot of spare PC133 (64M-128MB-256MB) at home, so I'm trying everything I have. To my surprise, the 256MB double-sided PC133 showed at 128MB on Xandros. It's the only one I have. All the other 256MB are sigle-sided. What do I have to look out for in 256MB PC133 or PC100 so my system reaches 768MB? Is there anything else important other than buying 16 chips sticks (double-sided) ? Could Xandros (or any other OS) be responsible for the 256 to 128 drop ?

Any "good" advice is appreciated.

Regards
 
Old 02-10-2005, 07:40 PM   #2
tormented_one
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You need pc100 not 133. I had the same problem with a compaq I came across. 440bx is the same as the one that was in it. I couldn't get 133 to work in mine either. The computer started out as a p2 350 with 128m ram. I put a p3 550 and 768m ram. The reason for the 256 reading as 128 could be mobo don't except 256 or that it don't take pc133. Actually I just read the link you posted and it tells you everything right there. pc100 in sizes 16/32/64/128/256.
 
Old 02-10-2005, 08:06 PM   #3
Darin
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I've never had a problem with using faster (PC133) RAM in a system that was designed for slower (PC100 or PC66) RAM. I have had the issue with certain sticks not detecting, or detecting at a lower value than what they are, like your 256MB stick reading as 128MB. I think there are some older sticks that are [double-sided/16 chip] that still don't have what the older systems need, as I've run into some sticks that don't detect right even though my 256MB PC-133 "16 chip" stick works in the same motherboard, even old 66Mhz bus mobos.
 
Old 02-10-2005, 08:34 PM   #4
tormented_one
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That is not good on the motherboard. The reason they don't read right is there is a problem, ie toofast. If even if you get the chip to read right its detrimental to the cause because you are under powering the ram, and tring to overpower the motherboard. You are putting undo stress on your system. So if I see you post something like my mobo fried or something like that I will have to laugh. Sorry but you are olny causing problems for yourself. I built an AMD 1300mhz with a gig of ram and the guy put faster ram in it, next the ram failed, then shortly after that the mobo went. I am not trying to be mean but it says pc100 for a reason.
 
Old 02-11-2005, 09:27 AM   #5
PC_Pal68
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tormented_one,

I have to disagree with you. I've been buying and installing PC133 on 100MHz mobo for a long time. Actually, there is not a big difference between them. It's a known fact that if you want to overcklock a CPU, it's nice to have RAM with a higher clock rate, so when you give your FSB a boost, the RAM can take it.

I've had problems in the past with another BX board: CUBX from Asus. But RAM problem with this board is well documented.


If someone else agrees with tormented_one, plz post it. I would be in shock that the answer is: Just put PC100 and you'll be ok!!!! And if this is the case, we'll have to look at the Intel BX chispset probably being the only one who doesn't do the clock down from 133 to 100.

And let's not loose the first reason for this post: the cut from 256 to 128. Is that related to clock speed for sure????

Regards

Last edited by PC_Pal68; 02-11-2005 at 09:29 AM.
 
Old 02-11-2005, 04:12 PM   #6
PC_Pal68
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The following link is the AX6BC page from Crucial:

http://www.crucial.com/store/listpar...X6BC&submit=Go

As you can see, this mobo (and any BX board) can take either PC100 or PC133. It doesn't make any difference. Same thing if you check with Kingston website.

So I guess I'm just unlucky with my only 256 double-sided RAM stick. Probably a cheap product. AzenRAM: if I'm not mistaken, it is llower quality RAM.

Regards.
 
Old 02-11-2005, 04:27 PM   #7
tormented_one
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Look holmes you asked for my opinion and I based my opinion on the title Question for RAM and/or Mobo expert and the fact you said nothing about overclocking. If you would have gave me some info on your compitence in computers. I would have answered it differently. Most don't even know where to start to overclock. Also I have a BX board that will only read 64 mb sticks. I literally have a box of ram 128-1024 sticks. All of them 100 or 133. I have tried almost all of these chips in this mobo to no availe. I know what the problem is, do you? So before you try to make me look dumb, remember I was thinking you were dumb. Sorry
 
Old 02-11-2005, 05:43 PM   #8
Electro
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In those days of 440BX chipsets, they are not combatible with double-side memory. You have to use single sided memory. Well you can use double-sided memory, but you can only use one double-sided memory and the rest needs to be single-sided memory.

tormented_one, you are wrong. You can use faster memory in any computer system, but it will not take advantage of it. It is better to use faster memory to get a better hit to wait ratio. The PC66, PC100, PC133 is just a stupid spec that does not mean anything. The real spec is the accessing time. I have seen many memory manufactures such as Corsair stating PC133 but in reality it is 125 MHz (8 nanoseconds). I have Kingmax memory that states PC133 but reality is 142 MHz (7 nanoseconds).

At the link
http://www.crucial.com/store/listpar...X6BC&submit=Go
shows what memory modules are combatible with the motherboard. That link should give you an idea what is combatible for the motherboard.

BTW, it does help to read the manual.
 
Old 02-12-2005, 10:18 AM   #9
PC_Pal68
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Electro,

Thanks for your reply. You basically said the same thing I did (even pasted in the same link). And you do have a good point about reading the manual. Since this is a given mobo, I did not have the manual, so I went and dl it from the web. I found something very interesting on page 15:

http://www.plaston.ca/files/ax6bc-ol-e.pdf

".... By visual inspection, use only DIMM which are less than 16 chips."

Now this means single-sided (or high density), right ? I tought these older boards were allergic to high density sticks ??!?!?!??!

I did not see anything about one stick being single and others double, or anything like that.

I understand that I could go to crucial or kingston or other RAM site, but I can save a little buying from a local store. And who doesn't want to save. Just need to know what to look for. This is starting to be very confusing.

Anyone care to clarify this

Last edited by PC_Pal68; 02-12-2005 at 02:21 PM.
 
Old 02-12-2005, 02:22 PM   #10
zapcojake
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Dunno about your mobo problem but you wouldn't want to sell some of your extra pc133 would you?
 
Old 02-27-2005, 08:50 AM   #11
Darin
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AFAIK the RAM has no way to make the motherboard go faster, but the motherboard can check the RAM and may slow down the bus to match it. A few years back I had some problems mixing PC66 and PC100 RAM but the reason was that the mobo first probed the PC100 stick that said it could do 100 so it didn't clock the bus down and the PC66 stick had problems. This is a case where the motherboard is capable of more than the RAM. If the RAM is rated faster then the motherboard has no way to surpass it's own capabilities and run at the RAM's speed so that shouldn't be an issue.

Some older systems not designed for the newer double sided [PC66/100/133] RAM will detect them at reduced capacity like half or even fourth or eigth of what the stick has. This is not related to the speed capabilities of the RAM but to the type of chips used (single sided stick), and the addressing scheme used to access them. It has also caused problems with every system I've seen it happen on. Basically, if the board reads it as anything less than it's rated capacity, don't expect it to run reliably like that.

Some older boards will work with one sided chips, but only up to a certain amount like 128MB, so they will take a 16MB stick with only 4 chips on it but will puke when you put a one sided 256MB stick in them. Reading the manual (decent companies have legacy downloads still online) is a good starter for finding what will work.

One thing to remember when reading the old manuals and documents is that some terminology has changed since PC100 was the "fast" RAM and 500MHz CPUs ruled the world. Some terms like PC66 RAM will rarely be seen in old documents, but it's commonly used to describe the first generation of that type of RAM that wasn't PC100 capable. High (or are the ones with less chips called low?) density RAM may also not be mentioned in older docs because the thought of a 256MB PC100 stick with only 4 little chips on it wasn't practical at the time those motherboards were released.

YMMV but I've never had a problem with higher speed RAM in slower boards, only with higher density.
 
  


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