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-   -   Nouveau driver + S-Video + Nvidia 5200 (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-hardware-18/nouveau-driver-s-video-nvidia-5200-a-913543/)

SilentSam 11-14-2011 06:52 PM

Nouveau driver + S-Video + Nvidia 5200
 
Has anyone managed to get S-Video working on an Nvidia 5200 using the Nouveau driver?

The card would be using the Nvidia-173.xxx binary drivers (which unfortunately do not work with the latest xorg-server 1.11). On my Arch install, I had to hold back the Xorg and XF86 packages, install the kernel26-lts package (probably a good idea for this legacy hardware anyways) and install the nvidia-173.xxx driver from AUR just to get s-video working. Ideally I don't want to hold back packages since this will cause issues in the future.

When I installed the nouveau driver, and editted xorg.conf to use it, s-video flickered constantly and the Xserver didn't seem to start up. I'm simply wondering if anyone has had success using this configuration before I progress with changes that I may not be able to revert anymore.

corp769 11-16-2011 04:56 AM

Hello,

Would this help? http://mysite.verizon.net/kraussa/nv...ux_tv_out.html

Cheers,

Josh

SilentSam 11-17-2011 10:59 AM

Thanks, but that post is offering a setup using the Nvidia driver. I currently have the Nvidia driver working, however, Arch is a rolling release distro and to keep this config I have to prevent a few packages from upgrading (such as the kernel and Xorg, two biggies for sure). To prevent future upgrade issues I would like to not prevent these packages from upgrading, which means I would have to use the Nouveau driver, not the Nvidia one.

Essentially I tried what you posted awhile back, but using the nouveau driver in place of the nvidia one, and it didn't work. If I reattempt this now, I won't be able to get my working config back again, and don't wish to do so unless someone can confirm that Nouveau works with S-Video out on this card. Thanks for the reply.

Brains 11-19-2011 08:11 AM

When using nouveau, you can delete /etc/X11/xorg.conf as xserver don't need that file to use it's drivers, you only need xorg.conf for proprietary drivers, at least that's how my Debian testing works.
On another note:
There is an auto body shop nearby that had five Windows XP computers and a server running Debian Woody. When I saw that I mentioned they should upgrade their Debian server. The owner said, "why? it's running just fine". When I asked if he ever applied updates he said, "No, the techs installed it and never touched it since, why fix something if it ain't broke?".
After some thought, I find we demand too much in life. I remember installing Fedora 5, and staying up late many nights getting all my hardware and peripherals configured only to get frustrated by updating it and starting all over again. If updating is such a pain, why do we do it?
Where am I going with this?
Why are you worried about issues with kernel updates when you probably don't need kernel updates, just go with the Nvidia legacy drivers and set your distribution not to do automatic updates. If everything looks good, works good, feels alright today, just use it as is, and in a year or so, if you get bored and want a change, reinstall with the latest and greatest and worry about the graphics then. There's a good chance you won't have that card by then due to computer upgrade or video card crapping out. Don't lose hair over it, just watch your TV or videos or streaming data over Svideo and chill out.

SilentSam 11-23-2011 03:19 PM

With Arch things ain't so easy... Let's say you want a particular package from the repo. This package will always be up to date, and will depend on specific versions of various library packages, etc... The packages constantly get renamed, so when attempting to install say, konqueror, this will depend on libjpeg, or sdlmame will depend on libsdl. Where am I going with this? Not updating constantly on Arch means that you eventually will not be able to install quite a bit from the repos, since a lot of your install will depend on something else, and the new package depends on the updated version (which has been renamed of course). The new package will require you install the associated dependencies, which require you to uninstall the old dependencies, which won't uninstall since they are dependencies of various other packages. So with Arch, you need to stay up to date just to use the repos. If I didn't want to rolling release I'd be using Debian or Slack, but I've hit a crossroad with this legacy Nvidia hardware.


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