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Old 11-01-2013, 09:02 PM   #1
k3lt01
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Motherboard suggestions for modern Linux (kernel >3.10 preferably)


OK moving on from a previous thread I'm after recommendations for suitable motherboards to use with current Linux kernels (current longterm 3.10 preferably)

Here are my thoughts so far.
Socket 2011 Ivy Bridge i7 4820k or i7 4930k.
I am considering an ASUS P9X79 motherboard, not sure what one yet, but am open to others such as ASRock or MSI etc. The advantage I see here is older hardware so the kernel should be compatible. It also, as mentioned in the other thread, allows for ridiculous amounts of RAM (up to 64GB) from the majority of motherboard manufacturers.

Socket 1150 Haswell i7 4770k.
I have no particular thoughts on motherboards with this yet. As far as I am aware the limit on RAM is 32GB which is still huge.

I basically have 1 thing I am trying to avoid and that is a lack of support for Linux in the components in the motherboard. If certain motherboards have chips or whatever (or even manufacturers that don't really offer much support) that are not good with Linux I'd prefer to know rather than buying a nice motherboard only to find out I may as well have purchased a breadboard.

Before I am pointed to the HCL I have looked at it and found much of it to be on older hardware.

With regards to form factor anything is acceptable because the case this is going in is huge (either a Corsair 900D or a CaseLabs case). This build is intended to last and the case eventually chosen will most likely be the last case I buy in a very long time.
 
Old 11-01-2013, 10:53 PM   #2
ozar
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I've built quite a few systems to run Linux on over the years and only one time did I have driver issues for the motherboard I'd chosen. This particular mobo came with a network chipset that there were no drivers for within the kernel. However, drivers were available that could be installed from source, and the kernel devs had the correct driver built into the next kernel upon its release.

That all said, I've always used ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards and haven't had any other issues with any of them. Eventually, I hope to try some of the other brands you've mentioned above.
 
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Old 11-02-2013, 12:25 AM   #3
k3lt01
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Thanks for your reply. I used to do new builds alot but I moved to a different town and that all come to an end so my knowledge of hardware is limited now. Basically I'm starting all over again and have been doing alot of reading in an attempt to get back up to speed on the topic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozar View Post
That all said, I've always used ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards and haven't had any other issues with any of them. Eventually, I hope to try some of the other brands you've mentioned above.
The original motherboard in my Pentium 4 was a Gigabyte from memory but it had a fault that would shut the PC down after 5 minutes of hard work (it got to hot) so I bought the current ASUS P4B8X and haven't had any difficulty with it. That was pretty much the last machine I built from new parts. I've heard good reports about ASRock and MSI but have no personal experience with them.

This build is not going to be a gamer but it will get video and audio work, and also software development (for university). My little laptop (Samsung RV511) is finding it a little bit much right now with the warmer weather (I'm going to get a laptop cooler base for it). The intent is to run 3 largish screens as well but thats another thread topic.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 04:26 AM   #4
k3lt01
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I'm currently looking at the MSI Z87 series of motherboards. One of these, haven't decided on a particular model, with an i7 4770k looks like a nice buy.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:32 AM   #5
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You're normally fine with the onboard addon chips like LAN and audio. Mostly they are Realtek, with some VIA, but there are some with oddball chips.

Sometimes you'll need to d/l and install drivers with the newest stuff...for example AFAIK a lot of the Z87 chipset boards come with Intel I217V which currently doesnt work 'out of the box' with most/any linux distros. (I could be wrong on that, I havent checked in detail).

What you need to watch for is some of the rather non-standard chips on some boards. Some of them are nice, but rather expensive (which pushes up the board cost a fair bit) and it can be a nightmare to figure out if the chip is supported or not.

BTW, in my personal opinion, MSI is awful. I've never had a MSI board work right, even the ones I bought new. Asrock is much better than I would have expected them to be (asrock is spun off asus, and they were originally a 'budget' brand). Asus and gigabyte make very solid board (though the _really_ cheap stuff isnt great). Intel is also an option.....they used to be very overpriced, but lately intel motherboard prices appear to have become much more reasonable.
 
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Old 11-02-2013, 06:07 AM   #6
k3lt01
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Thanks, I'll keep looking around. I personally have had ASUS mostly and prefer them, the experience with Gigabyte wasn't good.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 06:42 AM   #7
cascade9
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The P2/P3/P4 era gigabyte stuff was worse than what they make now......and IMO the asus stuff isnt quite as good it was in the same period. Not that asus is now 'bad', and if you prefer asus, get an asus.

*edit- if you are after virtualisation, get the i7-4770, not the i7-4700K.The 4700K doesnt have VT-d-

http://ark.intel.com/products/75122/
http://ark.intel.com/products/75123

*edit edit - Not really that valid for linux, missing the setup for the LGA 1150 system, and some of the 'tweaks' are possibly throwing the results, but interesting. i7 4820k vs i7 4930k with i7-3770K and i7-4770K and other current CPUs.

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum...-e-review.html

Last edited by cascade9; 11-02-2013 at 07:19 AM.
 
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Old 11-02-2013, 12:44 PM   #8
Steve R.
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I have the Asus P8B75-M LX Plus Motherboard , which I have been quite happy with. However, there are a couple of considerations, that you may wish to look into. I have the 3rd Generation Intelģ Core™ i7-3770 Processor installed, which appears to be "obsolete" now.
  1. Availability of USB 3.0 ports and Gigabyte LAN. (Which I assume all new motherboards may have.)
  2. The resolution of your monitor. The reason that I bring this up, is that the maximum output resolution of the P8B75 motherboard is 1920 x 1200. I just bought a 27" monitor with a resolution of 2560x1440, which necessitated the use of a graphic card. So if you are contemplating the use of a monitor that will have a higher resolution than 1920 x 1200 you need to either get a motherboard that can output 2560x1440 or get a graphic card.
  3. The ASUS GeForce GT 630 graphic card, as of the date of this posting, does not seem to get recognized by Ubuntu 13.10 at boot-up. This appears to be a specific motherboard/graphic card combination "failure". The Asus GeForce GT 630 works perfectly on another computer. The Gigabyte GeForce 210/PCIe/SSE2 installed with the P8B75 motherboard works as expected at the 2560x1440 resolution.

Last edited by Steve R.; 11-02-2013 at 12:54 PM.
 
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Old 11-02-2013, 03:33 PM   #9
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
*edit- if you are after virtualisation, get the i7-4770, not the i7-4700K.The 4700K doesnt have VT-d-
Not really after virtualisation, if I was going to run a VM I'd prefer to run a separate bootable partition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
*edit edit - Not really that valid for linux, missing the setup for the LGA 1150 system, and some of the 'tweaks' are possibly throwing the results, but interesting. i7 4820k vs i7 4930k with i7-3770K and i7-4770K and other current CPUs.

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum...-e-review.html
I like their stuff, they have a good YouTube channel (IMO anyway). I have also been looking through Linus Tech Tips but he is now sponsored by various IT business' so the sceptic in me wonders about biases creeping in.
 
Old 11-07-2013, 12:16 AM   #10
shane25119
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What ozar said above. Going back 10 years to my first build, I've never had a problem with the board "just working." Of course, bells and whistles features which cascade mentions might vary.

I've used ASUS, MSI, and Gigabit.

As to cascade's comments, I had an MSI board for a bit- never had an issue with it. Of course, N=1 isn't really generalizable... but for what it is worth, that's been my experience.
 
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