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Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

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Old 07-02-2012, 09:46 AM   #1
Dornith
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Linux with this Hardware?


In addition to being a first time computer builder, I am a first time Linux user too. I decided I want to install 64-bit Slackware on a machine and I have most of the parts picked out. I just wanted to know if I might have any issues with the hardware I picked (I'll list them below). Also, will I need to get different drivers or will they be the same as windows (what I currently use)?

Motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131781
CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...tel-_-19115072
Memory: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820145345
Graphics: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...ech-_-14102987
Hard Drive http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136533
Disk Drive: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827118067
 
Old 07-02-2012, 02:59 PM   #2
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

(Linux is Not Windows)

Newer bleeding edge hardware may not be supported yet. You should research each of the sub system hardware to see if the drivers are available.

UEFI BIOS on ASUS board may support BIOS compatibility, find out for sure. If not then find out about signing & validation for the 'EFI' compatibility mode. My money is that the BIOS compatibility supported so most Gnu/Linux will work with some setup effort. Be sure!
 
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:59 PM   #3
jefro
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Hello and welcome.

I have to point this out. "Also, will I need to get different drivers or will they be the same as windows"
You might be in for a wild ride here. Unless someone has posted already that all this works on a particular distro it is a crap shoot. You might get it all working or not. You can not use any window drivers with a slim exception to the nic.

The point of a distro versus you making your own "one of a kind install" is that they tried to put in all the common drivers that their target audience would use. They don't always get it right.

My question would be what do you wish to do with this rig? Seems to be a much more powerful video card than needed for linux.


Hopefully you are also using this for windows.
 
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:07 AM   #4
GreggT
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That video card is way overboard for Linux I would agree with the other post, unless you're going to game on a few of the games that run on linux and actually require hardware that isn't ancient.

As far as the linux drivers go, I know everything there works fine on almost all of the popular distros (ubuntu, debian, fedora, mint.. etc) except the motherboard (unsure of that) no idea for slackware but I really doubt it's years behind the others (that graphics card is a bit old, and that cpu is the most used in the world? and year + old.

So again, motherboard might be your only problem, but even then the universal drivers for network, pci and such should cover them I would imagine..
 
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:34 AM   #5
Dornith
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The main reason I used the graphics card is because I plan to have my current windows HD put into an external HD so that I can still boot to it and use anything that still requires windows.
 
Old 07-03-2012, 06:50 AM   #6
cascade9
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You wont need a $250 'gamers' video card to run windows from an external drive. If you arent building a gaming system, drop the video card to something more cost effective- ATI/AMD HD5450/6450 or nVidia G210/GT520.

You could have problems with the windows licence and/or moving the windows install to different hardware. BTW, running from an external USB 2.0 HDD will be a lot slower than if its an internal drive. USB 3.0/eSATA should pretty much the same speed as internal. Why not just install the HDD internally?

CPU- the i5-2500 (non 'k') is slightly cheaper, and if you arent planning on overclocking (or using the intel video) its a better deal. If you are planning on overclocking, ditch the stock CPU heatsink/fan.

Check the motherboard RAM comptibility list before you buy RAM.

I'd possibly get a different DVD-RW. Sony Optiarc drives arent that great, I'd spend a few extra dollars and get a pioneer or asus DVD-RW.
 
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:22 AM   #7
Dornith
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It's about 6 or 7 years old so I don't think it will be able to run in the new machine. If I get another HD I might mirror it over and make that an internal.

I do plan to overclock later. I plan on getting a bit more money and buying liquid cooling.

I already checked the motherboard for the ram, it all works.
 
Old 07-03-2012, 07:32 AM   #8
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dornith View Post
It's about 6 or 7 years old so I don't think it will be able to run in the new machine. If I get another HD I might mirror it over and make that an internal.
If its a SATA drive, it should work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dornith View Post
I do plan to overclock later. I plan on getting a bit more money and buying liquid cooling.
Dont bother with water cooling, unless you are doing a 'build you own' custom system. The water cooling kits are no better than good air cooling.
 
Old 07-03-2012, 03:29 PM   #9
GreggT
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Today in a lot of cases, fan & heatsink out perform or equal that of water cooling, only when you get to the high expensive radiators and hundreds of dollars into liquid cooling do you actually see a difference, and thermal paste brings it down more than that a lot of the time (from newegg testing)
 
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Old 07-06-2012, 01:01 PM   #10
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggT View Post
Today in a lot of cases, fan & heatsink out perform or equal that of water cooling, only when you get to the high expensive radiators and hundreds of dollars into liquid cooling do you actually see a difference
Nah, you dont have to do it that way.

A $100 water block + a pump (you dont need to use expensive computer part branded 'water cooling' pumps) + a nice radiatior could end up being pretty much the same cost as most of the water cooling kits, and would preform a huge amount better.

The only problem with doing that is getting the radiator, mounting the fans and mounting it into the case. The most common way of getting a cheap rad is with car heatercores...I've seen people buy 250 x 125 x 50mm brass heatercores for $10-15.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggT View Post
thermal paste brings it down more than that a lot of the time (from newegg testing)
Dont trust newegg 'reviews'.
 
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Old 11-04-2012, 09:43 AM   #11
Dornith
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I had to get some drivers for the network and graphics card but everything works fine.
 
  


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