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Old 03-19-2013, 03:43 AM   #16
allend
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Yes - the disk is bad. If you do not have backups already, consider ddrescue ASAP.
 
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:11 AM   #17
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Can it be some other problem or should I just replace the hard disk or it might be also the motherboard or something else?
 
Old 03-19-2013, 09:10 AM   #18
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The HDD is definitely failing because of the short test and there is no reason to suspect any other component at this time.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 11:04 AM   #19
alaios
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Are there any limitations on what hard disk I can install on a laptop?
Actually I am thinking between those two


http://www.amazon.de/Western-Digital...3705159&sr=1-3

http://www.amazon.de/Seagate-Momentu...3705162&sr=1-1

have a look at the thumbnails where the achieved speeds are written.
What is the process now I should follow to copy the current partitions to the new external disk, before I replace it to the laptop? I have already these atapi/sata to usb cables.


after edit: The model I already have
http://www.ebay.com/itm/WESTERN-DIGI...-/190577925523

Last edited by alaios; 03-19-2013 at 11:15 AM.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 12:17 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allend View Post
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.M.A.R.T.

Quote:
Reallocated Sectors Count
The raw value normally represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped. Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This allows a drive with bad sectors to continue operation; however, a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the near future.[
and
Quote:
Multi-Zone Error Rate
The count of errors found when writing a sector. The higher the value, the worse the disk's mechanical condition is.
and
Those comments are referring to the raw values, which were not shown in the screen capture. Applying that interpretation to the normalized values is dead wrong. For the normalized values, which are what is shown in the "Value" column, high numbers are good and values below the threshold indicate failure.

From the data shown, the disk does not appear to be in perfect health, but without the raw values it's hard to make a judgement. (I really hate fancy tools that suppress important information.)

[Edit]: I just saw the followup post that does show the raw values. 111 reallocated sectors and 112 more sectors pending reallocation and currently visibly bad to the OS. Yes, it's bad.

Last edited by rknichols; 03-19-2013 at 12:22 PM.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 12:31 PM   #21
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I would get the seagate drive, but it's a matter of personal choice. I don't like WD drives.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 01:08 PM   #22
alaios
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Can it be that my laptop does not support the new one_ Please have a look above on the model I gave so to suggest me what to do.

regards
Alex
 
Old 03-19-2013, 01:35 PM   #23
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It looks like this is your current HDD:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136197
So my recommendation is:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148599
Any 2.5 inch HDD with SATA 3.0Gb/s (revision 2.0) should work.

However, I do NOT guarantee that it will work. You never know with an old laptop. I replaced the IDE drive on my old laptop and it didn't recognize it, probably because of a BIOS issue.
 
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:55 AM   #24
alaios
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I bought the disk. What is the procedure now to clone the old partition to the new one? As my linux is still running I was thinking to connect the new hard disk with atapi to usb cables to complete the clone first. I am more intrested in cloning that hidden laptop partition that is used to recover the official windows 7. Is there something special with that partition for cloning it?

Alex
 
Old 03-20-2013, 05:22 AM   #25
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I recommend using:
http://clonezilla.sourceforge.net/
It can do a lot and is easier and safer to use than 'dd'.
 
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:46 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
I recommend using:
http://clonezilla.sourceforge.net/
It can do a lot and is easier and safer to use than 'dd'.
Thanks for the suggestion, is there any recommendations for copying the hidden partition (i.e like flags that I need to set)?
 
Old 03-20-2013, 10:38 AM   #27
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If you use clonezilla to read your disk with bad sectors, you will probably need to select "Expert" mode and use the "-rescue" option. Otherwise it will stop on the first failed read. The "-rescue" option in clonezilla is not as good as the error handling in ddrescue or gddrescue, so you might have to use one of those tools to copy partitions containing bad sectors.

The clonezilla live CD contains both those tools.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 01:52 PM   #28
alaios
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rknichols View Post
If you use clonezilla to read your disk with bad sectors, you will probably need to select "Expert" mode and use the "-rescue" option. Otherwise it will stop on the first failed read. The "-rescue" option in clonezilla is not as good as the error handling in ddrescue or gddrescue, so you might have to use one of those tools to copy partitions containing bad sectors.

The clonezilla live CD contains both those tools.
Hi, how I can later to extend the partitions? The new hard disk would be larger than the one I currently have
Alex
 
Old 03-20-2013, 03:17 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios View Post
Hi, how I can later to extend the partitions? The new hard disk would be larger than the one I currently have
Alex
For the Linux ext2/3/4 partitions, it's easy. Make the new partitions the size you want, use clonezilla or whatever tool to copy the old filesystem into the new, larger partition. Then run resize2fs on the new partition, and it will automatically extend the filesystem to fill the partition.

For Windows, the NTFS resizing tools I've found do not seem to understand the notion of extending the filesystem unless they are also changing the partition size at the same time. So, you would need to make the new partition slightly smaller than intended, copy the filesystem over, and then use gparted, ntfsresize, or one of the available Windows tools to adjust the partition size and make the filesystem fit. (Perhaps you don't intend to change the size of your NTFS partition. That would be the easiest.)

For a swap partition, there is of course no reason to copy the old partition. Just run mkswap on the new partition.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 04:23 AM   #30
alaios
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rknichols View Post
For the Linux ext2/3/4 partitions, it's easy. Make the new partitions the size you want, use clonezilla or whatever tool to copy the old filesystem into the new, larger partition. Then run resize2fs on the new partition, and it will automatically extend the filesystem to fill the partition.

For Windows, the NTFS resizing tools I've found do not seem to understand the notion of extending the filesystem unless they are also changing the partition size at the same time. So, you would need to make the new partition slightly smaller than intended, copy the filesystem over, and then use gparted, ntfsresize, or one of the available Windows tools to adjust the partition size and make the filesystem fit. (Perhaps you don't intend to change the size of your NTFS partition. That would be the easiest.)

For a swap partition, there is of course no reason to copy the old partition. Just run mkswap on the new partition.
I can not copy the windows partitions through clonezilla software?
 
  


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