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TuxLives 01-19-2009 10:12 AM

Dual Monitors (laptop + extra monitor)
 
Is there any easy way to do this?

I'm running Mandriva 2008.1

Everything I have found is about editing some xorg.conf file and I never do seem to get it right.

TB0ne 01-20-2009 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3413870)
Is there any easy way to do this?

I'm running Mandriva 2008.1

Everything I have found is about editing some xorg.conf file and I never do seem to get it right.

There may be, but you don't say anything about your hardware, or what you've actually tried, and what error(s) you got.

Step one is to make sure your laptop can support running dual-monitors. That's hardware-dependent, check your manual. If it is, there is probably a drake for Mandriva to let you set up dual-head. And the option you need to put in /etc/X11/xorg.conf is the Xinerama option...lots of info on the net on how to set it up, but I'd strongly suggest going through your GUI to do it. It's a pain to do manually.

TuxLives 01-20-2009 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne (Post 3415010)
There may be, but you don't say anything about your hardware, or what you've actually tried, and what error(s) you got.

Step one is to make sure your laptop can support running dual-monitors. That's hardware-dependent, check your manual. If it is, there is probably a drake for Mandriva to let you set up dual-head. And the option you need to put in /etc/X11/xorg.conf is the Xinerama option...lots of info on the net on how to set it up, but I'd strongly suggest going through your GUI to do it. It's a pain to do manually.

Right, that's my problem. I don't know "what GUI" to use. Is there something already there normally or do I need to download something?

Ps

yes, I run dual monitors when I boot into winders.

TB0ne 01-20-2009 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3415157)
Right, that's my problem. I don't know "what GUI" to use. Is there something already there normally or do I need to download something?

Ps

yes, I run dual monitors when I boot into winders.

No, but after some looking around on Google, I couldn't find anything on Mandriva, as far as a systems-administration GUI. OpenSuSE and RedHat have them, though, but that won't help you. :)

Try this tutorial...yes, it's for Ubuntu, but should apply:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=1773624

It seems hideous, but it's fairly straightforward. Be SURE to make a backup copy of your xorg.conf file first!!! Copy it to your home directory...that way, if X won't start, you can roll back easily.

Shadow_7 01-20-2009 11:51 AM

It's not that complex of a thing. Assuming your video card is dual head (supports two independent monitors). Otherwise you may only get a clone image. Basically options "xinerama" "true" / options "clone" "false" in your server layout section. Then separate sections for each monitor, and each screen. And other things. Granted that having such a setup tends to expose some of the bugs in drivers. But some configuration tools that ship with certain video drivers lets you set that up. aticonfig / amdcccle and whatever nVidias versions are. The main thing is to be sure to have both monitors hooked up and turned on before starting X. Everything else could almost be automatic for certain distros.

TuxLives 01-20-2009 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadow_7 (Post 3415188)
It's not that complex of a thing. Assuming your video card is dual head (supports two independent monitors). Otherwise you may only get a clone image. Basically options "xinerama" "true" / options "clone" "false" in your server layout section. Then separate sections for each monitor, and each screen. And other things. Granted that having such a setup tends to expose some of the bugs in drivers. But some configuration tools that ship with certain video drivers lets you set that up. aticonfig / amdcccle and whatever nVidias versions are. The main thing is to be sure to have both monitors hooked up and turned on before starting X. Everything else could almost be automatic for certain distros.

Yeah, I just wish I had something I could do built in.

The couple times I messed with xorg.conf, I had to role it back as it screwed everything up (obviously my fault), but having a tool would ensure that all the entries get handled properly.

PS

if I setup dual monitors, and I am out of the office, it'll function as a single, correct?

TB0ne 01-20-2009 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3415189)
Yeah, I just wish I had something I could do built in.

The couple times I messed with xorg.conf, I had to role it back as it screwed everything up (obviously my fault), but having a tool would ensure that all the entries get handled properly.

PS

if I setup dual monitors, and I am out of the office, it'll function as a single, correct?

Yes, if you use Xinerama. There are several good tutorials out there on Google..the one I sent before has references to two video cards, and adds complexity when there doesn't need to be.

Xinerama makes two screens function as one (big) screen. However, if you use nVidia's Twinview, it may function differently. I can't speak to that, since I didn't like the way Twinview worked, and went to Xinerama quickly after trying it. :)

TuxLives 01-20-2009 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne (Post 3415196)
Yes, if you use Xinerama. There are several good tutorials out there on Google..the one I sent before has references to two video cards, and adds complexity when there doesn't need to be.

Xinerama makes two screens function as one (big) screen. However, if you use nVidia's Twinview, it may function differently. I can't speak to that, since I didn't like the way Twinview worked, and went to Xinerama quickly after trying it. :)

Thanks, I'll stick with it since I am a disciple.

But, I can see why windows is so popular :-/

sorry, but i never "have to" (yes and I don't get to either) edit config files.

TB0ne 01-20-2009 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3415212)
Thanks, I'll stick with it since I am a disciple.

But, I can see why windows is so popular :-/

sorry, but i never "have to" (yes and I don't get to either) edit config files.

No, Windows is popular, because it comes on PC's by default...you even pay more, since the cost of Windows is included in the price of your PC/laptop. Ordering a system without an OS is difficult, thanks to MS's licensing agreements.

And many Linux distros have GUI tools to do just what you want...the one you've chosen, doesn't. Nothing's keeping you to Mandriva, except preference...use OpenSuSE, Fedora Core, Ubuntu, or any other distro you want, and you won't have to edit anything to do what you'd like.

Personally, I'd rather be ABLE to change my system the way I want, rather than have someone tell me (Windows?), what I can edit, how.

TuxLives 01-22-2009 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne (Post 3415222)
No, Windows is popular, because it comes on PC's by default...you even pay more, since the cost of Windows is included in the price of your PC/laptop. Ordering a system without an OS is difficult, thanks to MS's licensing agreements.

And many Linux distros have GUI tools to do just what you want...the one you've chosen, doesn't. Nothing's keeping you to Mandriva, except preference...use OpenSuSE, Fedora Core, Ubuntu, or any other distro you want, and you won't have to edit anything to do what you'd like.

Personally, I'd rather be ABLE to change my system the way I want, rather than have someone tell me (Windows?), what I can edit, how.

Yes, but as you just pointed out. I can't do what I want to do with Mandriva.

You're telling me that I have to switch (and in this case it's a major maybe that I will be able to actually do the thing I want to do). I don't want to switch and I cannot change my system the way I want.

Doesn't sound good to me.

TB0ne 01-22-2009 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3417544)
Yes, but as you just pointed out. I can't do what I want to do with Mandriva.

You're telling me that I have to switch (and in this case it's a major maybe that I will be able to actually do the thing I want to do). I don't want to switch and I cannot change my system the way I want.

Doesn't sound good to me.

No, you CAN do what you want with Mandriva. But you're saying you don't want to edit things, so there's three options you have:

1. Edit the files anyway...it's not difficult.
2. Find a GUI based tool for Mandriva that will do what you want, if it exists, or:
3. Use the power that you have available with Linux, to write your OWN GUI.

There's no doubt at all that Mandriva supports Xinerama, and that it works great. Have you checked the Mandriva forums??

TuxLives 01-22-2009 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne (Post 3417625)
No, you CAN do what you want with Mandriva. But you're saying you don't want to edit things, so there's three options you have:

1. Edit the files anyway...it's not difficult.
2. Find a GUI based tool for Mandriva that will do what you want, if it exists, or:
3. Use the power that you have available with Linux, to write your OWN GUI.

There's no doubt at all that Mandriva supports Xinerama, and that it works great. Have you checked the Mandriva forums??

Just because one "can" do something does mean that it is practical or realistic.

You saying that I should become a programmer?

quaint.

Yes, the mandriva forums just point me to the ubuntu forum that is just xorg.conf.

I've not found a GUI that works as of yet.

Shadow_7 01-22-2009 07:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3417735)
Just because one "can" do something does mean that it is practical or realistic.

You saying that I should become a programmer?

quaint.

Well, try video editing. And have a bunch of types tell you to just buy windows, just buy $400 editing software. So you want to be a developer, that'll cost you $2,500 extra in windows. Not to mention unmarketable skills like tweaking the registry, dos/bat file programming. Although I suppose keeping current on installation from scratch monthly is employable. As long as you keep your day job as a landscaper, painter, truck driver, food services, .......

I think I'll stick with linux as much as I can. All the power, none of the out of pocket costs. Outside of a few dud printers and wireless cards that barely work in windows. And don't yet work in linux. Which is a cheaper upgrade IMO. As long as you have access to linux compatible hardware (damn you retailers / manufacturers).

-----

I think you're over thinking it. Unfortunately if you get your X configuration wrong, you can't use X. So you do need basic CLI skills. Which IMO is no different than learning config.sys and autoexec.bat in windows. As if that didn't fall into the programmer category back in the day. Not to mention win.ini, system.ini, command.com, regedit.exe, same old same old, just a rose by another name. At least linux comes with free documentation and developer tools (and source code).

AFAIK, all you need is the "xinerama" "true" and "clone" "false" options, X should be able to sort out the rest. Although you might need to use some sort of X -configure (based on a specific base config (yours)) to get the right configuration. Not much different than trying to setup fixmbr in XP. Since you've got to change two different options in two different locations just to get there from here. It took me longer to find the location / name of those than it does to install most distros.

TB0ne 01-23-2009 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TuxLives (Post 3417735)
Just because one "can" do something does mean that it is practical or realistic.

You saying that I should become a programmer?

quaint.

Yes, the mandriva forums just point me to the ubuntu forum that is just xorg.conf.

I've not found a GUI that works as of yet.

Folks are trying to help you out, which is far more than Microsoft would, so it would be nice to not make snotty comments like "quaint"....

We're pointing you to information, which you don't want to use. You seem set on Mandriva, which (apparently), doesn't have a GUI to do what you want. Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, and CentOS all have them, and are all free. Pick one, enjoy....otherwise, you're stuck with editing a file by hand, which would take you about 10 minutes (if that long), and you'd be done.

Reading a document, and typing some things in doesn't make you a programmer, anymore than checking the oil on your car makes you a mechanic.

TuxLives 01-23-2009 10:55 AM

Wow, thanks for setting me straight.

The linux community IS friendly.


PS

--Read your own posts

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne (Post 3418572)
Folks are trying to help you out, which is far more than Microsoft would, so it would be nice to not make snotty comments like "quaint"....


We're pointing you to information, which you don't want to use. You seem set on Mandriva, which (apparently), doesn't have a GUI to do what you want. Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, and CentOS all have them, and are all free. Pick one, enjoy....

It seems hideous
Quote:


otherwise, you're stuck with editing a file by hand, which would take you about 10 minutes (if that long), and you'd be done.

3. Use the power that you have available with Linux, to write your OWN GUI.

Quote:



Reading a document, and typing some things in doesn't make you a programmer, anymore than checking the oil on your car makes you a mechanic.


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