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Old 08-04-2004, 01:50 PM   #1
skistner
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Determine Physical RAM size


All,

I need to determine the physical RAM size on a Red Hat Linux server. I know how to find the allocated RAM size(using free), but how do I find out the actually physical size of the RAM without opening up the box and looking at the RAM ?

Last edited by skistner; 08-04-2004 at 01:57 PM.
 
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Old 08-04-2004, 02:06 PM   #2
Vookimedlo
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But free output shows also physical memory size


[duda@iguana proc]$ free
total used free shared buffers cached
Mem: 514592 274136 240456 0 20228 134104
-/+ buffers/cache: 119804 394788
Swap: 1052216 0 1052216


or you mean each RAM module size at each bank?
 
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Old 08-04-2004, 02:09 PM   #3
rjlee
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Code:
cat /proc/meminfo
The first line on the output should be "MemTotal:", and give you the amount of RAM in kB.

Robert J. Lee
 
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Old 08-04-2004, 02:41 PM   #4
skistner
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I mean the RAM module size at each bank. Is there anyway to find that out without opening in the box ?
 
Old 08-04-2004, 07:05 PM   #5
michaelk
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I don't not think so but I've been proven wrong more then once.
 
Old 08-05-2004, 12:17 AM   #6
Electro
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Setup lmsensors and it will tell you. The memory have to have a SPD chip.
 
Old 12-08-2008, 01:58 AM   #7
tlg
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Detecting physical memory in Linux systems

The command:

cat /var/log/dmesg | grep Memory:

will tell you the amount of physical memory detected at system start up.

This memory size is correct even where Xen is used and memory is allocated to guest machines (assuming the command is entered at a
Dom0 terminal.)

Other commands like top and meminfo will only tell you about the memory available to Dom0, and won't include memory taken by the guest virtual machines.

Last edited by tlg; 12-08-2008 at 02:09 AM. Reason: added Xen
 
Old 12-08-2008, 02:06 AM   #8
SqdnGuns
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlg View Post
The command:

cat /var/log/dmesg | grep Memory:

will tell you the amount of physical memory detected at system start up.
You realize this thread is 4 1/2 years old?
 
Old 01-12-2010, 12:34 PM   #9
80HD
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by SqdnGuns View Post
You realize this thread is 4 1/2 years old?
You realize that the post was relevant to the issue, that most people find this site through search engines while troubleshooting a problem? Is it better to just start a new thread "Hey, I was reading an old post on the forum... and here is related info!!"? If so, I would gladly do that... perhaps a "Do not "bump" post" option would be nice, so at least the data stays together but doesn't cause any panty bunching?

So, in keeping with:

Quote:
"Please note that this thread has not been replied to in over 6 months. Please ensure your reply is still relevant and timely."
Here is some info that I believe more directly answers the original question (checking slots without opening the box)... I came upon it searching for the answer myself, and thought I would share!

Quote:
I found the following at: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/check-ram-speed-linux/

Basically if you run dmidecode --type 17, you will get the following output (note that it is erroneously listing 133MHz in place of 13333MHz) - I have highlighted the pertinent parts in bold:

(I pulled this off my Laptop - D900f running Fedora 12)

Handle 0x0017, DMI type 17, 28 bytes
Memory Device
Array Handle: 0x0016
Error Information Handle: Not Provided
Total Width: 64 bits
Data Width: 64 bits
Size: 4096 MB
Form Factor: DIMM

Set: 1
Locator: J1MY
Bank Locator: CHANNEL A DIMM 0
Type: Reserved
Type Detail: Synchronous
Speed: 133 MHz
Manufacturer: Not Specified
Serial Number: Not Specified
Asset Tag: Not Specified
Part Number: Not Specified
Rank: 1

Handle 0x0019, DMI type 17, 28 bytes
Memory Device
Array Handle: 0x0016
Error Information Handle: Not Provided
Total Width: 64 bits
Data Width: 64 bits
Size: 4096 MB
Form Factor: DIMM
Set: 1
Locator: J3MY
Bank Locator: CHANNEL B DIMM 0
Type: Reserved
Type Detail: Synchronous
Speed: 133 MHz
Manufacturer: Not Specified
Serial Number: Not Specified
Asset Tag: Not Specified
Part Number: Not Specified
Rank: 1

Handle 0x001A, DMI type 17, 28 bytes
Memory Device
Array Handle: 0x0016
Error Information Handle: Not Provided
Total Width: Unknown
Data Width: Unknown
Size: No Module Installed
Form Factor: DIMM
Set: 1
Locator: J5MY
Bank Locator: CHANNEL B DIMM 1
Type: Reserved
Type Detail: Synchronous
Speed: 133 MHz
Manufacturer: Not Specified
Serial Number: Not Specified
Asset Tag: Not Specified
Part Number: Not Specified
Rank: 1

Handle 0x001B, DMI type 17, 28 bytes
Memory Device
Array Handle: 0x0016
Error Information Handle: Not Provided
Total Width: 64 bits
Data Width: 64 bits
Size: 4096 MB
Form Factor: DIMM

Set: 1
Locator: J4MY
Bank Locator: CHANNEL C DIMM 0
Type: Reserved
Type Detail: Synchronous
Speed: 133 MHz
Manufacturer: Not Specified
Serial Number: Not Specified
Asset Tag: Not Specified
Part Number: Not Specified
Rank: 1
 
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Old 01-13-2010, 04:58 PM   #10
tlg
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Thanks for the tip. Very handy.
 
Old 02-21-2010, 07:13 AM   #11
nima0102
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wrong result

Hi
Thanks for your good topic and reply
Unfortunately dmidecode can not give correct information about my memory!!
I have 4Gig DDR3 but dmideocde can not determine type my ram,and shoe "type= other" and "speed: 667Mhz".
But speed of my ram is 1333 MHz.

Thanks for nay help or guidance
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:38 AM   #12
cgtueno
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Hi

You can run Memtest86 (Google and download a copy off the www) that will identify the modules that are installed, module CAS latency information, which module banks are filled, symmetric/asymmetric module configuration, etc.

It can be run from a CDROM image standalone (without affecting the system installation). It has a suite of tests that check the modules for correct operation.

It's a really useful test and inspection tool.

Regards

Chris

Last edited by cgtueno; 02-22-2010 at 02:42 AM. Reason: Augmented and edited
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:52 AM   #13
micxz
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How about:
ls -la /proc/kcore | awk '{print $5}' | tr -d '';
Or even easier to read:
a1=`ls -la /proc/kcore | awk '{print $5}' | tr -d ''`;echo $(($a1/1024/1024))MB;
 
Old 02-22-2010, 05:55 AM   #14
nima0102
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Thanks for your attention
Quote:
Originally Posted by micxz View Post
How about:
ls -la /proc/kcore | awk '{print $5}' | tr -d '';
Or even easier to read:
a1=`ls -la /proc/kcore | awk '{print $5}' | tr -d ''`;echo $(($a1/1024/1024))MB;
What does The output of this command indicate???

Thanks in advance
 
Old 02-22-2010, 06:37 AM   #15
nima0102
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Thanks for your reply
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgtueno View Post
Hi

You can run Memtest86 (Google and download a copy off the www) that will identify the modules that are installed, module CAS latency information, which module banks are filled, symmetric/asymmetric module configuration, etc.

It can be run from a CDROM image standalone (without affecting the system installation). It has a suite of tests that check the modules for correct operation.

It's a really useful test and inspection tool.

Regards

Chris
But I need to one tool that I can install on production server and I do not want restart the system.

Thanks
 
  


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