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Old 10-09-2013, 04:57 AM   #16
cascade9
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Just becasue you have a constant 2.67GHz does not mean that you've got 'more optimum performance out of the machine.'

BTW, fedora 17 is end of life, out of support. You probably should update to a newer version.

Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
My A+ certification book says that passive cooling is when the CPU is slowed down when it gets warm rather than increasing the fan speed.
Which one?

Quote:
CompTIA A+ Certification: Comprehensive: Instructor's Edition

4.5. Unit summary: CPUs and motherboards

4.5.1. Review questions

20. You open your PC and look at the CPU. How can you tell if it uses active or passive cooling?

If there is just a heat sink on the CPU, it uses passive cooling. If there's a fan attached to the CPU, it uses active cooling.
http://my.safaribooksonline.com/book...d_motherboards

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Just for completeness, on modern Intel systems (Sandy-/Ivybridge, Haswell) the ondemand governor does not work as it should, it uses in fact more power and heat as the performance governor, because due to the constant polling the CPU is not able to reach deeper sleep states.
Yeah, that is one of the reasons why I said 'most'.

The old Core2Duo/Core2Quad chips dont have this issue though.
 
Old 10-09-2013, 01:07 PM   #17
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Well the term "performance" seems pretty explicit to me and I do notice a difference.

My book was writen by Mike Meyers. I don't have the hard copy in front of me, just the ebook (which is difficult to navigate here on my phone) but I remember a section talking about a CMOS setting for the CPU cooling with 'passive' being an option.

Yes I know Fedora 17 is outdated but this machine is the family computer that does what it needs to do and it is set to receive Debian 7 when I get the time.
 
Old 10-09-2013, 01:34 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
Well the term "performance" seems pretty explicit to me and I do notice a difference.
Performance in this context means nothing more that the powersaving for your CPU (as explained earlier, this is not the case for newer Intel CPUs) is disabled, so what you basically get is a higher electricity bill and a warmer and therefore noisier system. I seriously doubt that with that CPU the performance increase from setting this governor is higher than 1-2%. I personally recommend to use the ondemand governor for that CPU, but of course it is up to you.
 
Old 10-09-2013, 05:53 PM   #19
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Would it be unreasonable for me to ask for evidence (links) that support your claim? Perhaps my eyes are deceiving me in regards to the empirical evidence that my computer is presenting to me.
 
Old 10-09-2013, 06:19 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
Would it be unreasonable for me to ask for evidence (links) that support your claim? Perhaps my eyes are deceiving me in regards to the empirical evidence that my computer is presenting to me.
Would help to know which of the claims you mean and if you would present your empirical evidence.
 
Old 10-09-2013, 10:45 PM   #21
graeyhat
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"Performance in this context means nothing more that the powersaving for your CPU" and as for presenting the empirical evidence I'm not sure that would be economically feasible seeing that you live in Germany and I live in the USA. I guess perhaps we'll have to consider this as an unresolvable issue where both parties (whether reasonable or unreasonable) are unwilling to take steps to defend their position.
 
Old 10-10-2013, 12:15 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
"Performance in this context means nothing more that the powersaving for your CPU"
The different governors are basically just rulesets that the the kernel at which frequency it should run the CPU. The performance and powersave governors are static rules, they set the CPU to its highest/lowest frequency and never change. The ondemand and conservative governors are dynamic rulesets, they set the frequency dependent on CPU load (ondemand instantly switches to the highest frequency under load, conservative switches in smaller steps until the load is lower than a certain threshold). The userspace governor is a static rule, where the user sets the frequency for the CPU. The switch between clockspeeds is so fast that it should not affect the machine works more than a very tiny amount. In fact, modern CPUs are so fast that, while typing this text into the browser it reaches deep sleep states between every keypress.
Car analogy: When you reach a red traffic light you step from the gas pedal (ondemand, conservative) or you keep the pedal fully pressed down (performance) while waiting for the light to change to green.
 
Old 10-10-2013, 01:53 AM   #23
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Well I would suggest to anybody else who comes across this thread to try out the different governor rulesets as it is a simple task and may reveal the same results to them as I am experiencing myself, or on the other hand may support your above claim of course.
 
Old 10-10-2013, 02:30 AM   #24
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
My book was writen by Mike Meyers. I don't have the hard copy in front of me, just the ebook (which is difficult to navigate here on my phone) but I remember a section talking about a CMOS setting for the CPU cooling with 'passive' being an option.
Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
Would it be unreasonable for me to ask for evidence (links) that support your claim?


As far as frequency scaling goes, if you really need a link-

Quote:
Scaling governors
Governor Description
ondemand Dynamically switch between CPU(s) available if at 95% cpu load
performance Run the cpu at max frequency
conservative Dynamically switch between CPU(s) available if at 75% load
powersave Run the cpu at the minimum frequency
userspace Run the cpu at user specified frequencies
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...quency_Scaling
 
  


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